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What Are You All Reading?

 
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: West Virginny and Kentuck
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Testing this book link thing.

I just finished .

It wasn't nearly as compelling as the first in the series, A Madness of Angels.

ETA : Well, that didn't work.  Let me try this

<a href="https://www.librarything.com/work/8574792">The Midnight Mayor</a>.

I guess I need to be pointed to where I can learn how to link a book title.

Well, I do know how to post images

 
steward
Posts: 4960
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I recently finished reading The One-Straw Revolution by Msanobu Fukuoka, and I also started and finished Holy Cows and Hog Heaven by Joel Salatin.

I am now reading The Road Back to Nature by Masanobu Fukuoka. Right now, I think it is just quite interesting from the prefaces how much Masanobu Fukuoka has grown and developed since he wrote The One-Straw Revolution.
 
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Dave Burton wrote:I recently finished reading The One-Straw Revolution by Msanobu Fukuoka, and I also started and finished Holy Cows and Hog Heaven by Joel Salatin.

I am now reading The Road Back to Nature by Masanobu Fukuoka. Right now, I think it is just quite interesting from the prefaces how much Masanobu Fukuoka has grown and developed since he wrote The One-Straw Revolution.



When we first moved to the Ozarks in 1973, and soon thereafter, several books helped shape our thinking about self-reliance and sustainable agriculture.  One was One Straw Revolution, going out as a hardbound Christmas present this year, along with Larry Korn's biography, One Straw Revolutionary.  We actually grew tiny amounts of wheat, all the way to bread, once or twice.  (Lodging was a major problem.)  So Gene Logsdon's Small-Scale Grain Raising was also inspirational.  And Ruth Stout, the Nearings, and Jethro Kloss.  And the few glances I managed through someone else's Farmers of Forty Centuries, which I reread a few years ago.  (Now I try to pick up every blade of grass we track in and dutifully get it into the compost bucket and back into the garden soil.)  I don't remember what started us on "French Intensive Gardening", or on companion planting, but both were a huge part of life.  Most often, though, the struggle was to create any topsoil at all, much less double dig it.

And parallel to these were the broader cultural inspirations:  Seven Arrows, Black Elk Speaks, Ishi, Last of His Tribe,  and other First Nations books, including two from my father's boyhood, Manabozho and Stories the Iroquois Tell Their Children.  Also inspiration from Japan: a book of Hiroshige prints, and Harold Henderson's Introduction to Haiku.  And soaking up local Ozark history, from the library, from neighbors, and from the river.  And National Geographic.
 
steve folkers
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PS--

And since we had no power nor even money for batteries (most of the time) for radio or tape decks, we read The Complete Sherlock Holmes out loud, by kerosene lamp.  
 
master steward
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Location: West Tennessee
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I've been reading Radical Regenerative Gardening and Farming by Frank Holzman.
 
Dave Burton
steward
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I am still working in reading The Road Back to Nature by Masanobu Fukuoka. At the moment, I find this book to be one of those where I kind of need to read with a few grains of salt, because Masanobu Fukuoka frequently inserts his own personal spiritual beliefs . I do appreciate his insights and practices for improving the soil and reading the landscape, and I am glad that he sees sacredness in the natural world. The book seems to be written as a personal journal of sorts from his travels, so, I'm not sure what I was expecting. I still think the practical points in the book are worth putting up with some of the more preachy aspects of it.
 
gardener
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Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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I am currently reading a recipe/instruction book on how to use an "Instant Pot". I bet you can all guess why!

The Ultimate Instant Pot Cookbook, by Coco Morante
 
pollinator
Posts: 1416
Location: RRV of da Nort
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New storm bearing down on the northern Plains of the US. I’m cozying up with “Repair and Maintenance Manual: MTD 8/24 two-stage walk-behind snowblower”.

👍
 
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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There's probably some high drama in that manual.

I was on Google, looking at the most popular sayings by Christopher Hitchens. Lots of them are quite biting, but sometimes they are just funny.

He was not fond of people who don't really care, asking, "how's it going?" So he habitually responded, "a bit early to tell."
 
pollinator
Posts: 284
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6b
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One thousand white women by Jim Fergus, and the sequel, Vengeance of mothers.

The Goodreads reviews are all over the map so don't come complaining if you try it and don't like it

Braiding sweetgrass comes next.
 
Posts: 79
Location: Lasqueti Island, British Columbia
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I am currently reading
Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
By Bill Plotkin
I am really enjoying the book. It goes thru the different stages of life one faces and shows the difference between egocentric and soulcentric development.
It shows how one can go on to become an elder!

I am also reading The Fat Of The Land by Vilhjalmur Stefansson


I am also interested in reading Fields of Farmers by Joel Salatin.

 
Posts: 104
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I am rereading the book "Be Here Now". Its' author, Richard Alpert aka Ram Dass transitioned out of his body last week. I discovered it when I was pretty young and it changed the way I saw the world and how I thought.
 
Posts: 64
Location: London, UK
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I recently came across the book The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer - a spiritual book - here is a link as to its content

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Untethered-Soul-Journey-Beyond-Yourself/dp/1572245379

I was delighted to discover that the book is available free, in audio form on youtube!  

It's just over 6 hours long and, of course, is best assimilated by being dipped into in small intervals.
I am now almost 2 hours into it and it's getting more interesting.  

Initially it seemed overlong in describing the incessant internal 'chatter' that is familiar to those doing meditation and the dynamics of this.  However, it has now moved on to the heart (something which is my current focus) and energy....so great!  
Has anyone here read this book?  If so, what did you think of it?

Here is the youtube link for anyone wishing to hear (rather than read) this book

https://youtu.be/pP63bPfIVjM
 
gardener
Posts: 908
Location: Galicia, Spain zone 9a
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I have just read this.  I loved it. It is the story of a guy who ends up walking the camino de Santiago.  Funny and well written.  
https://www.amazon.com/Camino-Sinners-Guide-Eddie-Rock/dp/082530881X/ref=sr_1_13?keywords=a+sinner%27s+guide&qid=1578477519&s=books&sr=1-13
I have met Eddie Rock as he now lives in Galicia. He is now drug, alcohol and tobacco free.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11599
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Reading Effin' Birds, by Aaron Reynolds.  Cussing fun.

 
pollinator
Posts: 225
Location: OK High Plains Prairie, 23" rain avg
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Lab Girl by Hope Jahren. A well written and entertaining memoir by a scientist. The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben. Fascinating. Both of these books are available as audio books on Overdrive which I check out through my library.
 
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Location: Virginia
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"Capital in the 21st century" - by Thomas Piketty
"Unsettling of America: culture and agriculture" by Wendell Berry
"Our towns : a 100,000-mile journey into the heart of America" by James Fallows
 
Ruth Meyers
pollinator
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denise ra wrote:Lab Girl by Hope Jahren. A well written and entertaining memoir by a scientist. The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben. Fascinating.



I've enjoyed both of those.  Lab Girl was a bit uneven, but The Hidden Life of Trees was wonderful!  In fact, I used your word when I reviewed it: "Fascinating!  Some of what he writes is hard to believe.  Can't quite tell if wishful thinking stretches the science.  But his ecology of coastlands makes all kinds of sense.  I hope people who can adopt these practices are listening."

I'm indulging myself with a re-listen of The Martian, by Andy Weir while in the car.
At home I've started A Soil Owner's Manual, and will probably just jump to Chapter 5 - 'How do I restore the health of my soil?
 
Dave Burton
steward
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I’m continuing reading The Road Back to Nature by Masanobu. I’m starting to come around to his personal writing, thoughts, anecdotes. I find it’s kind of an extension of his philosophy that he doesn’t make much of a distinction between the different aspects of his person- philosophical, spiritual, science, etc.
 
pollinator
Posts: 409
Location: BC Interior, Zone 6-7
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A Confederacy of Dunces. Can't believe I hadn't come across it before. Really funny.
 
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Location: Boondock, KY
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After the flyby of Oumuamua, there was a lot of talk about Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama.  Finally came by a copy.  Started up on that one while still finishing up Richard Brautigan's Trout Fishing in America. Both are fun in different ways so far.  
 
Jay Angler
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I just read Small Homes: the right size  by Lloyd Kahn. Well, mostly read - it is a picture book after all! Almost all the featured houses were between 400 and 1200 square feet and there are lots of ideas about efficient layout and efficient use of space.
 
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Laurence Tribe, To end a presidency, The power of impeachment

Bob Flowerdew, simple green pest and disease control

Joachim Peterson, Beekeeping
 
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Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars
http://woodheat.net
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