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What Are You All Reading?

 
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hey,

These kinds of question always and always intrigued me to write something.

The book I am currently reading is Me before you by jo jo Moyes. The book is worth reading and a perfect combination of love and sacrifice. Me Before You brings to life two people who couldn’t have less in common—a heartbreakingly romantic novel that asks, What do you do when making the person you love happy also means breaking your own heart?

I read this book after going through the list of 25 fascinating books. All the books on the list are perfectly justified.
 
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Ive gone throught the first three Aubrey-Maturin books and LOVED them. Having a break with Nicholas Nickleby. All audio cos I knit while I listen. Love Dickens.
 
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I recently finished reading Longitude by Dava Sobel and Early Retirement Extreme by Jaokob Lund Fisker.

I am still reading the Omnivore's Dilemma for a class, and I will now be reading Wild Edibles by Sergei Boutenko for fun.
 
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Dave Burton wrote:I recently finished reading Longitude by Dava Sobel and Early Retirement Extreme by Jaokob Lund Fisker.

I am still reading the Omnivore's Dilemma for a class, and I will now be reading Wild Edibles by Sergei Boutenko for fun.



What class are you taking that requires reading Omnivore’s dilemma for? I think that’s amazing!
 
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A book my wife and I recently read presents much to think about how to survive. "The Stranger in the Woods" by Michael Finkel tells the true recent story of a Mainer who lived completely alone in the Central Maine woods for 27 years undetected.It is a remarkable story told to our investigative reporter on his visits to the prison where Chris Knight was incarcerated. Well written and researched it reads like a Stephen King thriller,the writer who happens to come from Maine as well!
 
Dave Burton
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I recently finished reading Wild Edibles by Sergei Boutenko, and I recently checked out Botany in a Day by Thomas J. Elpel.

The books I am currently reading right now are:
- The Omnivore's Dilemma by Mike Pollan
(this book is for my anthropology class on Food and Culture)
- Maphead by Ken Jennings
(this book is for my Geographic Information Systems class)
-Botany in a Day by Thomas J. Elpel
(this book is for fun, my own personal growth, and my interests)

Hi Liv! The Omnivore's Dilemma is required reading for my Food and Culture class. The book and class are both pretty interesting. The class explores practically everything about food and culture- an evolutionary look at eating (what different primates ate), a historical anthropology look (what early hunter gatherers ate), a modern anthropology look (what do current hunter gatherers eat, other societies eat, other cultures eat, etc), and an ecological view, too (what methods do people use to feed themselves and the effects those methods have on the environment. It is a very broad an interesting class; so far, we have talked about primates, paleolithic diets, different types of teeth/digestive tracts/associated diets, methods of fishing, cannibalism, different broad categories of subsistence, insectivores, and now vegetarianism and veganism.

Hi Stuart! I'm glad you have the stomach for thriller books! I find such books difficult to read, and I think I would find the book even harder to read, because it is about someone who actually exists.
 
Stuart Sparber
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Reality can be quite scarier than fiction! My wife and I have read around 10-15 books of first person stories of survivors of the Holocaust of Jews. Believe me the ones who lived and survived to tell the story lived experiences so unbelievable that you could think they made it up. But they didn't! I saw it first hand when I was a child and so many older people I knew had numbered tatoos.Then most would tell you they couldn't and wouldn't repeat the stories. Later in the 1980's they came forward. My own best friend's mother and father survived the horrible work camps. All she could say was "Stuie you couldn't believe! "Over and over she said this! My sister-in-law's parents also survived the Holocaust as well as the Russian Revolution and Castro's Revolution in Cuba. If anyone is interested in reading this Holocaust literature I'd be glad to give you a list of books.
 
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I read “Clan of the Cave Bear “ in the late 1980’s

At that time all the authorities said there was no neantherdal interbreeding with Homosapiens.

Now DNA shows up to 5% in the European human genome.

I keep seeing the “earliest North American” and other areas moved back 10,000 years at a time so I think the author was very right. Like Johnny Cash said, our ancestors have “been everywhere man”
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Have just finished listening to The Old Curiosity Shop, cried a lot!, and am now listening to Bleak House, read beautifully by the great Miriam Margoyles, and am thoroughly enjoying it.
 
Dave Burton
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I recently finished reading Botany in a Day! It was a great book!

Im almost done reading The Omnivore's Dilemma, and I am still reading Mapheads.

I'm going to take a break from reading serious book, and I'll be reading another flash fiction (short stories) book called Flash Fiction International.
 
Dave Burton
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I finished Mapheads a couple of days ago. I am currently reading Elegant Simplicity by Satish Kumar and Flash Fiction International. So far, I am enjoying Elegant Simplicity. It is very simple and easy book. It reads pretty quickly. And Flash Fiction International is just as much of an enjoyable run of the gauntlet of human experiences that The Pearl Jacket was. It is both uplifting and entertaining as well as shocking and scary.
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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I am re starting The Name of the Rose cos it must be me who finds it so unbelievably hard and tedious since everybody around me says how great it is. May be I should stick to Dick Francis or Agatha Christie....
 
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My niece's Magic Treehouse books. She also wants me to read this book about this girl from Mozambique (i forget the title but it's gotten good reviews).
 
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Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:I am re starting The Name of the Rose cos it must be me who finds it so unbelievably hard and tedious since everybody around me says how great it is. May be I should stick to Dick Francis or Agatha Christie....


Bless your heart. I like to read long and tortuous things and I can barely restrain myself from rolling my eyes remembering this book. Eco can be a bit of a slog!

I am reading Dopesick, which meshes very well with current affairs about opioid developments, and 21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Harari, which is a great if maybe not entirely positive and uplifting read.
Probably the best thing I've read recently has been Changing Your Mind by Michael Pollan, which was WAY better than I expected (and I`ve been recommending it to everyone I know).
 
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Dave Burton wrote:-Antifragile by Nassim Nicholas Taleb



I love all of Taleb's books!! "Fooled by Randomness" is especially good as it's about risk.
 
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I have just started reading the Humanure Handbook by Joseph Jenkins. I read parts of it years ago, but I'm hoping to figure out a system that will work in our current circumstances.

While I was away my sister fed me large print murder mysteries from her local library and I enjoyed J D Robb's books in particular. Totally unrealistic, but a pleasant diversion.
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Bless your heart. I like to read long and tortuous things and I can barely restrain myself from rolling my eyes remembering this book. Eco can be a bit of a slog!

AMEN TO THAT!
NOT JUST ME THEN. THE FILM WAS GREAT......
 
Dave Burton
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I recently finished Elegant Simplicity by Satish Kumar, and I loved the entire book. I think this will have to go onto my long to re-read list.

I am now reading Renewal by Andres Edwards and Flash Fiction International.
 
pollinator
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Lots of good books listed here. But I don't read books, really... Well, stupid trash for entertainment and I don't think that counts.

But I _do_ read magazines, every day. I want to soak up basic current issues w/out the flash-bang and droning heads found on pretty much all mass media. While not inclusive, I seem to read most of the following each month: Harpers, TheAtlantic, NewYorker. Then occasionally the Economist, VanityFair, seem to have some decent reporting. I'm sure there are lots of others, but the only time I "read" is during breakfast and my coffee capacity is a seriously limiting factor. <g>

Cheers,
Rufus
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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I sent back The Name of the Rose (sorry Umberto - way beyond my levels of concentration while I knit) and am soothing my jangled brain with Little Dorrit. Aaahhhhhh!
 
Jay Angler
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Rufus Laggren wrote:

Well, stupid trash for entertainment and I don't think that counts.

Rufus, if it makes you smile or laugh or just relaxes you, it counts! Too often we got caught up in life and forget that entertainment can be good for the soul!

I'm currently juggling two books: The Humanure Handbook, 3rd edition - I'm amazed by the composting info that relates to things other than Humanure!
I'm also reading Jodi Picoult's "a spark of light". She seems to write about social issues, trying to bring information and opinion from both sides into the topic by creating a story. This one's a fairly easy read, but in the summer I read, "small great things" and it was more difficult for me. It dealt with racial discrimination which my living situations have kept me largely insulated from.
 
Rufus Laggren
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I dunno, Jay. I definitely put on less weight reading Sci-Fi for relaxation than if I drink a beer, but I'm not sure it's any more nutritious - in any way! <g>

But I just got a book from a friend titled "White Trash". American history from about 1600 to 1890 aimed to highlight the actual role of CLASS in America. It's scholarly in the sense of being written by  "prof", including foot notes, but it's an easy read that totally turns the George Washington Cherry Tree type stuff (and a lot of the holy moly life, liberty and Holy Constitution) on its head. Women and all minorities should at least read the first couple chapters. For example, from what I've read so far, it appears we had a "Trump" long ago - Andrew Jackson. Be nice if they taught that stuff in highschool instead of higher ed.


Cheers,
Rufus
 
Dave Burton
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Speaking of which, I finished Flash Fiction International and Renewal.

I'm currently just reading one book right now - Pow Wow: Charting the Fautl Lines in the American Experience. This book aims to highlight the stories of minorities in America, as told through short fiction stories they have written.  I'm still kind of on a short-story binge.
 
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A worn copy of an anthology of pastoral poems.
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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I have just finished Desolation Island in the Aubrey/Maturin series and am listening to Dombey and Son while I can up a months worth of dog food, potatoes, carrots and beans.
 
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Rufus Laggren wrote:
But I just got a book from a friend titled "White Trash". American history from about 1600 to 1890 aimed to highlight the actual role of CLASS in America. It's scholarly in the sense of being written by  "prof", including foot notes, but it's an easy read that totally turns the George Washington Cherry Tree type stuff (and a lot of the holy moly life, liberty and Holy Constitution) on its head. Women and all minorities should at least read the first couple chapters. For example, from what I've read so far, it appears we had a "Trump" long ago - Andrew Jackson. Be nice if they taught that stuff in highschool instead of higher ed.


Cheers,
Rufus



Thanks for the recommendation! I agree, it would be nice if actual history was taught in this country, unfortunately it is not. I was raised by grandparents born in the first decade of the 20th century who were poor/hobos/migrant workers and later union workers. Much of the real history of the working class and poor of this country is untold.

btw, we've had many "Trumps". I'm old enough to remember the 1980s and have officially nicknamed Trump "Rude Ronald Reagan". I don't mean this in a political way, simply to highlight our ruling class' priorities and policies have stayed pretty consistent no matter the President and party. It's all style and optics and controlled opposition IMO.

As for what I'm reading, the list is long. I am in the middle of Antifragile, which is fantastic. I just finished the book "Consequence" which is very good, and happens to be written by a co-worker. It might be interesting to permies as it's about eco-activism and genetic engineering and protest movements, etc.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25895036-consequence


 
Dave Burton
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I am currently reading the book Food from the Radical Denter: Healing Our Land and Communities by Gary Paul Nabhan
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Am still working my way through Dickens, and planted all my corn and tomatoes yesterday while listening to Our Mutual Friend. Just before I had listened to Back Story, by David Mitchell. Really interesting and very funny!
 
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I just got around to reading two that have been on my TBR pile for a long time.

Willa Cather's My Antonia
C. S. Lewis' Surprised by Joy.

On my drive to and from work this week, I've been listening to some of the Harry Dresden corpus, by Jim Butcher.
 
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I love the Dresden Files. I have read/listened to the series at least a half-dozen times.

Butcher's first series is pretty good, too. Sort of a tale of the lost Roman legion that tripped through a wormhole and found themselves in a land filled with Pokémon.

I really enjoyed the first book of his Cinder Spires series, the second of which he will start when he's finished writing Peace Talks, the next book in the Dresden Files.

Enjoy your read, and let us know what you think.

I wonder if the book review wiki should accept fiction, or if we should have another just for fiction. My only caveat would be that fiction would probably need to be reviewed in a way that ties the story to, or highlights, permaculture, though not as an absolute rule, but rather as a guideline, to make it more permaculturally relevant.

-CK
 
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I read most of "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth", by Chris Hadfield the last couple of days I was in Ontario and will try and score a BC copy once I've got things under control back on the farm. It is particularly worth reading his insights into team building/family dynamics (yes, there's an over-lap) and considering how that can relate to intentional community and cohabiting situations where 'drama' frequently derails good intentions.

Chris Kott wrote:

Sort of a tale of the lost Roman legion that tripped through a wormhole and found themselves in a land filled with Pokémon.

That description made me laugh! I've sent references to the series off to my Pokémon-era son to see if he'd be interested in trying them. Thanks!
 
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I'd bet Chris Hadfield would have some great insight on getting along with others when you don't really have a choice, and there's not much in the way of room, and handling it for months at a time.

I just finished reading Joe Jenkins' 4th edition of the Humanure Handbook, which was edited a lot compared to the 3rd edition I have. It reads much more like "a book" rather than "a research paper", and if you're into composting or reducing wasted water is a great read.

I just received a copy of 'Free Plants for Everyone' by David the Good, and will be reading that over the weekend. I'm thinking I should start buying the e-book versions of books and pick up a dedicated e-reader as a space saving option... I bought one for a friend who had a literal wall of books, and she ended up with 500+ books in the palm of her hand that she took everywhere. It needed charging maybe once a week after many hours of use.

For those into the swords and magic genre, Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series is a very impressive read. While he passed away before finishing the series, his wife hired another good writer who finished the last couple books. I believe there's a total of 14 books, and most are pretty large, like over 500 pages, so perhaps an option for next winter when you are stuck in the house for a long time.
 
Chris Kott
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The Wheel of Time is another one that I have read/listened to at least a dozen times. Not for years, though, since the last one came out.

Maybe I'm due...

-CK
 
Tereza Okava
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Mark Brunnr wrote:I'm thinking I should start buying the e-book versions of books and pick up a dedicated e-reader as a space saving option...


A few years ago I started using the e-reader, mostly as a way to keep up on US books (which are impossible to get here). I've had a few of them and the best thing I've found so far has been either a tablet dedicated for reading or my phone (as they seem to be getting bigger with every iteration.....). I had a Kobo, which was excellent (and not "lit", they had a version that was almost like a liquid crystal type thing), I loved it to pieces, but then my library changed its platform and no longer works with the Kobo. I still have "important books", paper ones I've brought around the world with me, and I still buy paper books, but unless they're "important" they get passed on to other people. Some of the "important books" I also keep as PDF or other e-format and also have a paper copy (Moby Dick. Shakespeare. Kipling. Garcia Marquez).
I really resisted e-readers but they changed my approach to books, which prior to tiny house/brown recluse spiders in the house was very much hoarding and now is more practical. Fiction is now electronic (still hoarded!), except for the important ones I read every year. The rest of the paper books are references for the garden, kitchen, or work.
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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I am having a love affair with audio books. During the day, when not listening to Pauls Podcasts, I have my tablet in a little back pack and listen to either Charles Dickens (Tale of Two Cities at the moment), Agatha Christie read by Emilia Fox (beautiful voice like her mother) or the Aubrey-Maturin series which I have read several times but am now listening to them read by Robert Hardy, who really makes them come alive. I find I work through my chores almost without noticing as I am so engrossed in the wonderful stories to which I am listening.
 
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reading as much here as I can trying to learn things I didn't know.
 
Chris Kott
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Mandy Launchbury-Rainey wrote:I am having a love affair with audio books. During the day, when not listening to Pauls Podcasts, I have my tablet in a little back pack and listen to either Charles Dickens (Tale of Two Cities at the moment), Agatha Christie read by Emilia Fox (beautiful voice like her mother) or the Aubrey-Maturin series which I have read several times but am now listening to them read by Robert Hardy, who really makes them come alive. I find I work through my chores almost without noticing as I am so engrossed in the wonderful stories to which I am listening.



Most of my daily consumption is via audiobook. I loved the Aubrey-Maturin series, too. It makes me want to watch that "Master and Commander" movie that came out a while back, the one that should have launched the Aubrey-Maturin Cinematic Universe, but I guess it was too soon.

One of my favourite things to do on long rides, or during periods of work where I don't want to look up too often, is I like to get performed works, like one of those BBC The Lord of the Rings audiobooks. I also like to listen to historical audiobooks. I recently listened to one about the Greeks, called The Greeks, penned by none other than Isaac Asimov.

It's amazing what you can learn when your hands are busy doing other things.

-CK
 
Dave Burton
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I am currently reading The Green Burial Guidebook by Elizabeth Fournier and Food From the Radical Denter by Gary Paul Nabhan. And, I am currently listening to Paul's homesteading and permaculture podcasts.
 
Jay Angler
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I've just started reading "Incredible Wild Edibles" by Samuel Thayer. He's got an interesting take on greens in the traditional diet and what's changed.
 
Dave Burton
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I recently finished reading The Green Burial Guidebook by Elizabeth Fournier. I'm starting to read Compost Teas by Eric Fisher.

I'm still reading Food From the Radical Center by Gary Paul Nabhan. I'm mostly reading this one before bed in small chunks, which is why it is taking me longer to read.

Aside from books, I read an awesome article called How to Do Nothing, and it touches on many different topics, like connections vs sensitivity, deep listening, fighting for the right to essentially be at peace, and so much more. And now, I really want to get How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy, because I found the article so impactful.
 
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permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
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