• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Beau Davidson
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
gardeners:
  • thomas rubino
  • Casie Becker
  • Mike Barkley

What is Your Favorite British Cuisine?

 
master steward
Posts: 9202
Location: USDA Zone 8a
2771
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What is Your Favorite British Cuisine?

Well-known traditional British dishes include full breakfast, fish and chips, the Christmas dinner,[3] the Sunday roast, steak and kidney pie, shepherd's pie, and bangers and mash.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_cuisine



Source - Bangers and Mash  


British cuisine has many regional varieties within the broader categories of English, Scottish and Welsh cuisine and Northern Irish cuisine. Each has developed its own regional or local dishes, many of which are geographically indicated foods such as Cornish pasties, the Yorkshire pudding, Cumberland Sausage, Arbroath Smokie, and Welsh cakes.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_cuisine



Source - Welsh Pies      




Source - Cornish Miners' Pasties      




Source - Scotch Eggs      


What is your favorite British Food?

 
pollinator
Posts: 2339
Location: Denmark 57N
585
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That pasty recipe you linked is terrible! totally and utterly wrong. you would be strung up in the Cornwall for calling that a Cornish pasty. Cornish pasties contain Beef (skirt mainly) not mice  potato, swede, salt and pepper placed into pastry raw and then cooked. no herbs no carrot and most certainly no cream of mushroom soup "shudder"
The official rules on them are  (Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) )

   They have to be made in Cornwall.
   They can only contain beef, potato, Swede (rutabaga), onion, salt and pepper.  No other meat, no other vegetables, no other seasonings allowed.
   The ingredients must be raw when the pasties are assembled and then slowly baked to produce the traditional Cornish pasty flavor and texture.
   The edges of the pasties must be sealed by crimping them in traditional Cornish fashion.

I'm quite prepared to let the first slip and the last in acceptable to change as well, but the middle two are sacrosanct!
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 9202
Location: USDA Zone 8a
2771
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Skandi, so sweet of you to point that out. I labeled it the way the source named it.

What would you call that picture?

Would you post a picture of what it really would look like for me? Or all the ones I got wrong?

I have never been to England or the United Kingdom so how would I know? I have never even eaten any of those foods or seen them in person.

Hey, I am just trying to help Henry with his contest.

This post was not about the food it was about winning PIE, apples and prizes.
 
Skandi Rogers
pollinator
Posts: 2339
Location: Denmark 57N
585
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:Skandi, so sweet of you to point that out. I labeled it the way the source named it.

What would you call that picture?

Would you post a picture of what it really would look like for me? Or all the ones I got wrong?

I have never been to England or the United Kingdom so how would I know? I have never even eaten any of those foods or seen them in person.

Hey, I am just trying to help Henry with his contest.

This post was not about the food it was about winning PIE, apples and prizes.



I can see it's not your recipe! The pasty also looks ok at first glance, it was the fact it had carrot in it that made me click the link and look at the recipe. I don't know of any British food that uses tinned soup (other than soup!) I think that's a very American thing to do.
See the pasty below looks nearly identical.


 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 9202
Location: USDA Zone 8a
2771
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
All apples and the PIE has been given!  Henry's contest is still going as far as I know.  I thought long and hard about how to pick the winner of the piece of PIE.  I thought about using the way we pick promotion winners, an apple poll, or asking members to pick their favorite.  In the end I decided to pick the TOPIC with the most replies.  So we have a winner! This topic was the winner of the piece of PIE:  https://permies.com/t/148274/Bicycle-riding-UK-Ireland

 
Posts: 90
Location: Surrey United Kingdom
26
forest garden chicken bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Skandi Rogers wrote:That pasty recipe you linked is terrible! totally and utterly wrong. you would be strung up in the Cornwall for calling that a Cornish pasty. Cornish pasties contain Beef (skirt mainly) not mice  potato, swede, salt and pepper placed into pastry raw and then cooked. no herbs no carrot and most certainly no cream of mushroom soup "shudder"
The official rules on them are  (Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) )

   They have to be made in Cornwall.
   They can only contain beef, potato, Swede (rutabaga), onion, salt and pepper.  No other meat, no other vegetables, no other seasonings allowed.
   The ingredients must be raw when the pasties are assembled and then slowly baked to produce the traditional Cornish pasty flavor and texture.
   The edges of the pasties must be sealed by crimping them in traditional Cornish fashion.

I'm quite prepared to let the first slip and the last in acceptable to change as well, but the middle two are sacrosanct!



im happy to hear how its suposed to be madeim quite fond of what they sell as cornish pasties here in south africa much like what you describe but with carot instead of swede (we dont grow swedes here) but on a trip to the uk last year i was rushing and missed breakfast so grabed a "cornish" pastie at the train station in london, it was probably 50% filled with leeks now im fin with leeks in soup ect but it was altogether too much in my pastie and ended up having to throw half of it away so glad to hear that this is not the norm in the uk.
 
master gardener
Posts: 4263
Location: southern Illinois, USA
1386
goat cat dog chicken composting toilet food preservation pig bee solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am a little late to the party, but I am in love with Scones.
 
master gardener
Posts: 2336
Location: Isle of Skye, Scotland
854
transportation dog forest garden foraging trees books food preservation woodworking wood heat rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I suspect British cuisine is a misnomer!
We tend to be very good at 'comfort food': puddings in particular, but filling and stodgy food in general.
Some I particularly like:

source
Stornaway black pudding. I'm not sure what they do to make it so good, but it's got a lovely soft texture that will spoil you for any other...

source
Pork pies. I used to really like the jelly bit in them, but as long as they're not too heavy on the pastry.

source
My husband's favourite "toad in the hole" which I hope everyone knows does not involve toads but sausages in a Yorkshire pudding type batter.

And don't forget steamed puddings......

source
Yes this is spotted dick!
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 9202
Location: USDA Zone 8a
2771
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nancy, those all sound really yummy.

I have long heard of the "Toad in a hole" here in the US, it is a breakfast food, not anything like the British Toad in a Hole.

Here is how to fix the American Toad in a Hole:

https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/toad-in-the-hole/
 
Skandi Rogers
pollinator
Posts: 2339
Location: Denmark 57N
585
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Funnily enough the things I buy from the UK include black pudding, (and white and fruit) Normally Bury as that's the one they sell. Haggis, branstons pickle, malt vinegar, marmite, birds custard powder, mixed spice...
I make my own pork pies and leave out the jelly, horrible stuff! Also sausage rolls, so good.

The thing I miss most? Sausages, British sausages are wonderful and you cannot get anything close here. All sausages have cured pork in them not fresh and are just not the same. I've gotten pretty good at making my own!

I had the parents in law round last month, for fish and chips followed by sticky toffee pudding (STEAMED not baked!) very nice but not exactly a balanced diet.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1998
Location: RRV of da Nort
442
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How could this thread have gotten so long without mention of "beans on toast"?  Fortunately, there are many recipes on the internet for it, but had a gal from Norwich tell me to include Worchestershire sauce in the recipe or it just would not be the same! :-)    I gotta think the 'bean burrito' in the States with its origins south of the border is an equivalent.....and I admit to liking refried beans as a toast spread with additional adornments.
BeansOnToast.JPG
Beans-On-Toast
 
pollinator
Posts: 2864
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
485
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Share some of your tried and true recipes ya'll. We are doing all things UK based this month and I could use some recipes from people in the know.
 
gardener
Posts: 2757
Location: South of Capricorn
1251
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
bangers and mash is in our regular meal rotation. Good stuff.
I like onion gravy, and I always recommend this recipe to people who want to learn how to make a good, flexible gravy (i`m amazed how often people tell me they're buying gravy mix or [gasp] gravy IN A CAN. To each his own, I guess, but you can have good gravy ready in 15 min using pantry ingredients...)
https://www.recipetineats.com/bangers-and-mash-sausage-with-onion-gravy/#wprm-recipe-container-24991
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 9202
Location: USDA Zone 8a
2771
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tereza, thanks for that link.

I think I may try the Sausage Bake that Nagi linked to from that recipe.

I have a freezer full of Venison Jalepano Link sausage that we don't like so maybe that is a recipe that we will like it in as I need to use it up.

Since I need recipe suggestions I am looking at her other recipes.
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2757
Location: South of Capricorn
1251
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:
I have a freezer full of Venison Jalepano Link sausage that we don't like so maybe that is a recipe that we will like it in as I need to use it up.


Another suggestion (though not particularly British) is to make curry ketchup and then currywurst. I could get my family to eat shoes if they have that ketchup on it.
 
pollinator
Posts: 874
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
320
4
urban books building solar rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Umm... Hello? Fish and Chips!! (and malt vinegar, or my new favorite pairing, sour beer!)

Scotch eggs are good too.
 
Posts: 88
Location: Yorkshire, UK πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ (Zone 8A, I think)
44
cat urban ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not much of a fan of British cuisine, despite being English. That being said tho:

Beans on toast - eat that quite a lot
Sausages & mash - mash has to be buttery, sausages have to be decent (Asda do lovely maple bacon flavour ones. Caramelised onion also good).
Chicken roast dinner. My bf makes it with fried stuffing (omg it’s amazing), mash, fried asparagus and steamed green beans.
 
gardener
Posts: 996
Location: Japan, roughly zone 9b - wet and warm climate
412
hugelkultur kids home care forest garden gear trees books cooking bike woodworking ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As an ignorant outsider I might be way off on this, but...

Isn't the best British cuisine supposed to be Indian cuisine?

Maybe that's just for the tongue in cheek.
 
Heather Gardener
Posts: 88
Location: Yorkshire, UK πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ (Zone 8A, I think)
44
cat urban ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

L. Johnson wrote:As an ignorant outsider I might be way off on this, but...

Isn't the best British cuisine supposed to be Indian cuisine?

Maybe that's just for the tongue in cheek.



Omg I love a good Indian πŸ˜‹ Totally valid point lol πŸ˜‚ Birmingham and Bradford especially are famed for their excellent Indian restaurants.
 
There are 29 Knuts in one Sickle, and 17 Sickles make up a Galleon. 42 tiny ads in a knut:
Get Paid to Build a Permaculture Paradise at Wheaton Labs!
https://permies.com/wiki/178360/permaculture-projects/Paid-Build-Permaculture-Paradise-Wheaton
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic