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Garden picture exchange!

 
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Mark Boucher wrote:Let's see if this works...



We are Raintree Nursery and below is our garden image with McDonald Filbert Hazelnut

strawberry plants for sale
 
gardener
Posts: 703
Location: SoCal USA
142
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I was poking around the back yard and just discovered that what I thought was several sunflowers in bloom is actually just a single 7-bloom monster, and there are a couple more blooms coming out, assuming I start watering it myself. We've had the wettest spring I can recall since moving here 12 years ago. We might have passed 20 inches since last October-ish, while the 18 months prior to that our neighborhood totaled just 3 inches. Average is around 10-11 inches per year, so this has been nice. My finicky avocado is fruiting in year 2, although it might be best to remove them so it focuses on more growth; the dwarf peach is covered in fruits, if I keep it watered the birds should get a delicious harvest!
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Mutant Sunflower?
Mutant Sunflower?
 
Posts: 415
Location: Georgia
16
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Garden is coming in!
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pollinator
Posts: 149
Location: Youngstown, Ohio
37
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The rain has made the garden very green.  I am also an herbalist so things like Angelica and Valerian are home here.
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Posts: 96
Location: northeastern USA
33
ungarbage
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finally several beautiful days in a row! among other garden tasks, i got the garlic weeded and replaced old styrofoam markers with wood burned scrap-wood signs, and HERE COME THE SCAPES!!!
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pollinator
Posts: 888
Location: 6a
268
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Anyone looking for a willow that's compact and ornamental I suggest the Salex Integra, "Hakuro Nashiki' (Dappled Japanese Willow).

The leaf tips are white and pinkish.  Stunning against a green background.
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Salex Integra
Salex Integra
 
Posts: 37
Location: NE AZ
9
forest garden food preservation greening the desert
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NE Arizona food forest we are working on. We have buried and above ground hugelkultures. Drip irrigation (only 10 psi). Hard clay and sand with PH of 8+ Zone 6B
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Mixed forest area
Mixed forest area
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Grass, herbs, and flowers
Grass, herbs, and flowers
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Below ground hugelkulture, stanley prune, and narrow leaf poplar (drip lines being installed)
Below ground hugelkulture, stanley prune, and narrow leaf poplar (drip lines being installed)
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Grapes, cherries and the food forest. (Happy Pride Month!)
Grapes, cherries and the food forest. (Happy Pride Month!)
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Food forest, mint, Jerusalem artichokes, roses, plums, sunflowers, onions, garlic etc.
Food forest, mint, Jerusalem artichokes, roses, plums, sunflowers, onions, garlic etc.
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The food forest in progress
The food forest in progress
 
pollinator
Posts: 380
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
74
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Kalaina Nielson wrote:NE Arizona food forest we are working on. We have buried and above ground hugelkultures. Drip irrigation (only 10 psi). Hard clay and sand with PH of 8+ Zone 6B



So much work! You look like you're making very good progress!
 
Kalaina Nielson
Posts: 37
Location: NE AZ
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forest garden food preservation greening the desert
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Thanks Diane,
Its been a slow process. This is the same spot as the food forest when we first moved onto our bare land.
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Posts: 49
Location: Zone 3 Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
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My new Hugelkultur beds:

I really like watching Youtube’s SelfSuffiecientMe. Sure he hails from Australia and I’m Zone 3 Canada, so you wouldn’t think there was much overlap, but I’m constantly absorbing ideas from his vids all the time.  

He’s the one, over a number of vids, who really explained to me that you can do Hugelkultur in a hard outer container, which can really be helpful depending on your growing locations. 10 Reasons Why Raised Bed Gardens are Best

Here are our first trials (please note, early growing season for us when pics taken, so not much greenery to show as of yet):


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Hugelkutur bed -- You can't tel from pic but this wood-framed bed is 3+ feet high
Hugelkutur bed -- You can't tel from pic but this wood-framed bed is 3+ feet high
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Hugelkultur raised beds made from purchased scrap metal
Hugelkultur raised beds made from purchased scrap metal
 
pollinator
Posts: 1416
Location: Denmark 57N
403
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
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The annual field (yes strawberries are not annual I know) looking towards the "forest" a mixture of fruit trees bushes nettles etc!
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gardener
Posts: 708
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
297
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Heat wave end of june, record temperatures, my small garden still going strong.
First pic, a friend gave me pumpkins he hopes to be edible pepita.
Second pic, fish aren't too happy, the water is warm and then less oxygen can dissolve in it, they're at the surface gasping for breath, i put the pump on.
The third pic is the portal into the plant dimension, once you go through it, you can not and do not wish to return ever.
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Hugo Morvan
gardener
Posts: 708
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
297
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fishpond
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Hugo Morvan
gardener
Posts: 708
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
297
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Portal
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master pollinator
Posts: 1572
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
495
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I saw this photo of the portal, so I wanted to show my portal too. Years ago there was a garden gate made of wood, painted green, which was why I named the place 'Portal Berde' (meaning Green Gate/Portal in Papiamento, the language of Curaçao). The wood didn't last and I wanted to have a real Green Portal of living plants. This is how it looks now. Partly liguster (hedge), partly rose, partly trumpet flower vine.

Portal Berde
 
pioneer & author
Posts: 145
Location: Hessle, North Yorkshire, England, Uk
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Awesome pics.
 
gardener
Posts: 967
Location: Ohio, USA
187
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Its not done, but it is coming together, so here it is!
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Kid and meditative friendly food forest
Kid and meditative friendly food forest
 
pioneer
Posts: 82
Location: Sydney, Australia. Subtropics
35
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A 5th floor rooftop garden I set up in Sydney. The photos are a little old but worth sharing
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Cosmos/borage insectary
Cosmos/borage insectary
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First harvest
First harvest
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Leafy greens grown under shade cloth low tunnels for extreme wind protection
Leafy greens grown under shade cloth low tunnels for extreme wind protection
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Malabar spinach and asparagus handling the extreme heat and wind
Malabar spinach and asparagus handling the extreme heat and wind
 
Posts: 4
Location: Tennessee
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Just moved into our house a little over two months ago. First thing we did was dig up bits of the lawn, lay down cardboard and make some garden beds!
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Posts: 18
Location: Asturias, Spain
6
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Some pics!
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Posts: 24
Location: Southern Oregon
14
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These are a few pictures from the garden this summer... The food "forest" is not shown in these...

The soil is decomposed granite which makes wonderful pathways - but doesn't even grow weeds without a lot of help! I used lots of leaves and wood chips and occasional loads of horse manure and bunny poo over the years - but mostly I don't do much now but chop and drop except for the annual veggie area.

I have been working on this place for 12 yrs. but much of it is only a few years old - since I am adding and changing every year.  I'm 80 yrs. old and plant it and take care of it myself with no help.  My son helped me create some of the hugelmounds (all through the gardens) and the arbors and the pond. Please understand that I am not bragging - I am pointing out that a huge garden can be created that even an elderly woman can care for... well - an elderly woman who happens to really LOVE gardening and loves having a reason to get out of bed and into the garden all year round!  Keeps me healthy and limber... but mostly keeps me sane...  :-)
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Dragonfly pond by the little woodland garden
Dragonfly pond by the little woodland garden
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Path to the chicken coop/potting shed
Path to the chicken coop/potting shed
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June veggie garden with purlap pathways
June veggie garden with purlap pathways
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garden entry from house
garden entry from house
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pond plants
pond plants
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path under prune tree
path under prune tree
 
Posts: 350
Location: London, UK
73
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Hi - I'm a newbie here and...wow...high time to bump up this excellent thread, yeah?

I'm a naturalist gardener and take much delight from nature's gifts, i.e. what naturally springs up!  Here are some of them.

The first photo shows a firethorn (on the right) that appeared out of a concrete patio!  It bears white flowers and red berries.

The 2nd photo is my front garden.  The red valerian (garden escape) also spring up from the concrete and very welcome they are too.
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Posts: 56
Location: Western Oregon (Willamette Valley), 8a/8b
21
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Welcome Amy!

It's that time of year when it feels like everything is gearing up for Spring! Here is our garden bun in his tractor working on clearing the last corner of grass inside our fenced garden. I leave him in a spot until he starts digging up the matted roots, supplementing with other forage, and then move the tractor and mulch heavily with leaves+well rotted wood chips+whatever I have on hand. So far it has been a nice slow and steady way to clear the mats of quack grass as we expand the garden area. I have planted peas and a bunch of spring greens, and am admiring the stuff that overwintered while I wait to greet the new seedlings that are on their way.


Overwintered kale and mustard


The shaded part of our yard is full of wild violets



I don't always love using plastic but I do like to up-cycle leftovers. If this stuff has to exist anyway, it makes me glad to be able to put it to good use a few more times before it must be tossed. I put out a bin marked just for solo cups at a community bbq and have been using them for 2+ years now. I also find they don't dry out on me as fast as cardboard/soilblock and my seedlings seem less stressed.


Happy spring!





 
Posts: 295
Location: On the plateau in TN
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3 photos after 0.86 inches of rain over night.  garlic about 13 pants, asparagus bed, over all garden with clover and some weeds!

Looks like they fouled up image posting, only websites now?
 
pollinator
Posts: 362
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Amy Francis wrote:The 2nd photo is my front garden.  The red valerian (garden escape) also spring up from the concrete and very welcome they are too.



Red valerian (I also have a white flowered one) is one of the only plants that survive my extremely hot, rainless, non-humid summers, even without any watering. Every year they drop tiny seeds (I’ve never even noticed them) to produce lots of new plants every spring. In kinder climates it can be called a weed but in my case it barely spreads at all (just as with mint).
 
pollinator
Posts: 406
Location: Vermont, USA
112
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This year’s garden is full of tiny plants, except for the asparagus. But here are some other pix. First, DH built beautiful new trellises. I have 2 varieties of heirloom pole beans, butternut and buttercup squash, and pickling and slicing cukes.

Second photo is the chickens cleaning up at the end of the season. Good job, hens!

Finally, a shot of the flowers nearby in full bloom. This year the lupines are blooming already!  And one of my centaurea montana.
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New trellises! For cukes, squash, and pole beans
New trellises! For cukes, squash, and pole beans
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Chickens cleaning up last fall
Chickens cleaning up last fall
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Pollinators
Pollinators
 
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Lawns are a waste of good water. Three years ago I sheet mulched and wood chipped my front yard and planted with native plants and grasses. I am now collecting lavender, yarrow, plantain, mullein, red-stem fillaree and Rabbit Tobacco for medicine, Concord grapes next to house, and also have a nice variety of plants -- usually only discernable to me that are some just establishing this year-- such as echinacea, elderberry, Munro's Globeflower, Firecracker Penstemen, a variety of potentilla, Lychnis, uva ursi, arrowleaf balsam root, Blue flax, Meriwether's Blanket Flower, dandelion, wild sunflower. Soon I will transplant Arnica Montana started from seed and incubating in the greenhouse. The grasses are primarily Idaho Fescue and Prairie JuneGrass. Each year I do pull out the lawn/grass that comes up. I have had to eradicate a couple REALLY noxious ones like Ragweed and Buffalobur Nightshade. I planted the Mexican Olive trees and Siberian Pea for a visual break and they are coming in slowly. The bright yellow in current photo is Genista Lydia and there is also lo-gro Sumac, wild roses, barberry and flowering Quince. Neighborhood has become slowly accepting of this new visual for an urban landscape! I've lived here 5 years and each year brings something new including wild creatures utilizing my yard for habitat.
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De-lawning my front yard
De-lawning my front yard
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Native-scaped front yard
Native-scaped front yard
 
Dianna Michaels
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Lawns are a waste of good water. Three years ago I sheet mulched and wood chipped my front yard and planted with native plants and grasses. I am now collecting lavender, yarrow, plantain, mullein, red-stem fillaree and Rabbit Tobacco for medicine, Concord grapes next to house, and also have a nice variety of plants -- usually only discernable to me that are some just establishing this year-- such as echinacea, elderberry, Munro's Globeflower, Firecracker Penstemen, a variety of potentilla, Lychnis, uva ursi, arrowleaf balsam root, Blue flax, Meriwether's Blanket Flower, dandelion, wild sunflower. Soon I will transplant Arnica Montana started from seed and incubating in the greenhouse. The grasses are primarily Idaho Fescue and Prairie JuneGrass. Each year I do pull out the lawn/grass that comes up. I have had to eradicate a couple REALLY noxious ones like Ragweed and Buffalobur Nightshade. I planted the Mexican Olive trees and Siberian Pea for a visual break and they are coming in slowly. The bright yellow in current photo is Genista Lydia and there is also lo-gro Sumac, wild roses, barberry and flowering Quince. Neighborhood has become slowly accepting of this new visual for an urban landscape! I've lived here 5 years and each year brings something new including wild creatures utilizing my yard for habitat.
 
pollinator
Posts: 146
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada -- Zone 5a
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I love taking pictures in my yard! Pretty hard to choose, but here are a few from this spring and summer:

First, the entrance to one of my gardens. My partner and I designed and built this arbour for the entrance. Next year I plan to have clematis growing on it... and maybe scarlet runner beans or something. The petunia and hosta planters are rescues (someone put them out as garbage). They were a pretty ugly brown and had a crack. I gave them an upgrade and love them.

My woodland rest area is where we sit under the shade of a big old beautiful tree. It's like a honey locust, but no thorns. The bench was a rescue again from someone throwing it away. I gave it new life in beautiful colours and we repaired the metal in one place. I also recently built the simple table out of a birch log and a piece of a tree my dad had to bring down. This is a peaceful place for a drink and snack at Happy Hour, and also a good private place to chat.

Trilliums--our provincial spring-blooming ephemeral.

This turkey started visiting regularly this year! It's fairly residential here, so this is a surprise, but on the other hand, we've been doing all we can to attract wildlife of all kinds (well, maybe not deer) :)

A pretty little spot of yellow in spring--the daffodils, the forsythia, and the sun.
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden
master pollinator
Posts: 1572
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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Made some new garden photos today. And now I put them in my own 'secret' thread, so I can show them here and they won't disappear:

The water catchment experiment in the front yard


Five year old Herb Spiral (left) and NEW Sepp Holzer Grains growing (the small patch with grass like plants at the right side).
I received those grains because of BB20.


Overview of the back yard garden, with many upside-down pots to attract toads

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