Inge Leonora-den Ouden

pollinator
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since May 28, 2015
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hugelkultur dog forest garden urban cooking bike
Accompanying the gardens (front and back yard) of my rented ground-floor appartment in the transformation to a miniature-food-forest, following permaculture principles (nature's laws) in different aspects of life
Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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Recent posts by Inge Leonora-den Ouden

Kyle Noe wrote:Hi Inge. I'm trying these out to see if they could be an option when our other watering methods are not available. Some times the fire truck is broken or the well low on water. I hoping these can provide the hugels enough water while not having a lot evaporate.


Hi Kyle. It is good to try things out.
When you are one or two days without other ways to water, an olla of ordinary size (1 or 2 liters) will help. For more days without watering you'll need a larger olla. But of course that's only when the plants are young, without a deep root to find their own water.

Lara Bigotti wrote:

Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:Hi Lara. I know about those plants that don't do photosynthesis (often called 'parasites', because they make use of the work of other plants). There's one I know the name of in Dutch, growing here in the Netherlands, but rare. It is not same one you show. Maybe they are in the same plant family Orobanchaceae (you can search for that on internet).

The plants smelling like mint has to be of the mint family (Menthaceae), because only mints smell like mints The one you show looks like water-mint to me. But it could well be another species, one that grows in Northern America and not where I live.



Hi Inge! Yes, very interesting to learn about the non-photosynthesizing plants. But I heard they form a symbiotic relationship with the fungus, which in turn form relationships with the trees, and it's like a chain of nutrient sharing/trading. Mycoheterotrophy is the rabbit hole I just now fell down in my research.

The mint turned out to be wild bergamot, which is in the mint family! Does that grow where you live? I am planting bergamot on my hugel and hoping it takes well.



Hi Lara. No, the wild bergamot is not a native plant here. It can be bought in a garden centre and planted in the garden though. So probably it's native in a climate somewhat like here.
About those non-photosynthesizing plants: probably the last few years many new discoveries are made on the symbiosis with fungi. I didn't learn that when I was young, but I find it very interesting!
Hi Kyle. In my garden I have two (real) ollas. So I can tell you: they don't hold water very long. Have to refill about every second day when the weather is dry. In my opinion they are not of much help; instead of refilling ollas one can water the soil around the plants just as easy.

Nicole Alderman wrote:I just realized we don't have a badge bit for making a dress. In that case, I think making a 6 gore dress would work for this BB. Just make sure it has pockets!


Thanks Nicole. Yes, with pockets!
2 days ago

Michael Helmersson wrote:

greg mosser wrote:if the plants come back every year, you must have something.



You would think. Unfortunately, it looks as though the voles have raided the groundnut patch. And the sunchoke patch. I'm going to wait a bit longer for the frost to go down before digging around.


That must be it! Voles take sunchokes! I asked myself: how is it possible there are sunchokes (Jerusalem artichokes) growing outside the original place, which is all bordered with concrete tiles (at my allotment garden). But now I think it is possible the voles took some of the tubers away and didn't eat all of them. And then one (or more) of those tubers sprouted there. Beware of the voles ... (Jerusalem artichokes are only allowed at the allotment gardens when they are grown in an enclosed space or planter).
Sorry if this becomes a little off-topic, it was a thought that appeared in my mind after reading that.

That looks very interesting Nicole. I hope there's someone who really knows Russian and will give a good translation. I don't know if the translation now is OK or not, but often such translations are somewhat off ...
3 days ago
Hi Lara. I know about those plants that don't do photosynthesis (often called 'parasites', because they make use of the work of other plants). There's one I know the name of in Dutch, growing here in the Netherlands, but rare. It is not same one you show. Maybe they are in the same plant family Orobanchaceae (you can search for that on internet).

The plants smelling like mint has to be of the mint family (Menthaceae), because only mints smell like mints The one you show looks like water-mint to me. But it could well be another species, one that grows in Northern America and not where I live.
My new 'miniature greenhouse', which I showed already in some other threads. It's made out of a toddler play tent and some transparent plastic table cloth. My seedlings are now in there, not on the window sil anymore. They are doing well, while there's frost all nights!  

my miniature greenhouse
4 days ago
Dez, your rolley shelves look great! I want to ask my son if he can make them for our garden cabin (shed) too
Today we planted a groundnut root in a large pot (sort of bucket) in the community garden of Permacultuur Meppel. Given by the same friend who gave me one (a piece of root with some tubers) too