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the most eco and last coffee maker - cowgirl coffee

 
gardener
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that's the thing! made of flannel. you could conceivably use any fabric, maybe even flax you made yourself. wire and fabric, lasts forever (as long as you don't let it get moldy- they are really easy to clean out if the water is drained).
 
steward
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Here is a thing that filters coffee with just stainless steel:


I found it here, on amazon.

The instructions are to heat water to 200 degrees (or let it cool a bit after coming to a boil) then pour a little water over the ground coffee in the filter to "bloom" it, wait half a minute, then pour the rest of the water over in a circular motion.  People say the coffee thus brewed is delicious, and it goes right into your mug (or you could fill a thermos or a pot, as it can make more than one cup).

Pour-over coffee is all the rage in Portland these days.

Personally, I'm using a manual espresso machine, where I'm literally pulling a shot with a heavy lever.  That too, is all made of stainless steel, but we had to look hard to find a good used one on Ebay that didn't break the bank.
 
master steward
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This is actually my husband's favorite way to make coffee, and he's been brewing it this way since I first told him about this thread, years ago. He's given away all his coffee makers and just happily uses a pot.

Yesterday, as he was brewing his coffee, he made this video:



Waiting for the coffee to erupt is one of his--and my kids'--favorite things to do
 
pollinator
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paul wheaton wrote:First I have to confess that I am coffee's bitch. When I was 18 I went to the doctor because of hundreds of blisters all over my hands.  He said "you drink a lot of coffee, don't you?"  Yes, about three pots a day.   Plus mountain dew.

Duke, did the doc explain exactly how caffeine caused the blisters? I remember the days of chasing down my coffee with lipovitan, red bull, jolt or coca cola.

One time when my french press broke, I switched over to something similar.  I put the coffee and hot water in a glass measuring cup:

Not as sturdy but any carafe from old drip machines are good too - available dirt-cheap at most flea markets and garage sales; or free in most attics, basements and deep dark cupboards. I start with boiling water and leave the grounds steeping indefinitely, and strain them out only when i pour into my mug (then nuke to ideal temp - 45 seconds on high). Most other coffee folks cringe at the thought of 'over-extracted' but i think their chemexes and harios make bland, insipid coffee.

I've eliminated caffeine from my diet many times in my life, and those were really unproductive years.  So now, I have exactly one cup of coffee each morning and no more.

Horrific years! how many ounces is your daily morning mug now? I must confess I still consume 48 ounces daily (4 12oz servings), sometimes more.
 
master steward
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pusang halaw wrote:Duke, did the doc explain exactly how caffeine caused the blisters?



nope.


how many ounces is your daily morning mug now?



I am going to guess:  18 fluid ounces.

 
Posts: 600
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We got rid of coffee machines in 2001 or 2002 and simply use a pan.

Once the water boils, it is taken off the heat and custom sized coffee grounds poured right in. A stir and while the mix is still whirling we set the pot on a log cut for holding the pan at a tilt.

Some observations.

Purified water or the best spring water only.

The combination of whirl and the low corner of the pot work together to help gravity sort stuff out.
Blowing over the top of the floating grounds releases them from the foamy surface mixture. I do this in the direction of spin.

Coffee is temp sensitive, too hot and it vaporizes the good stuff, too cold and you dont get much either. Steep with the lid on after a moment to flash off some.

Decant gently.

Getting groundless coffee without a strainer requires that the water is hot enough to expunge air from properly sized grounds, agitation to remove air bubbles clinging to grounds, and patience, dont be hasty or you will get the grounds too!
 
pusang halaw
pollinator
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frank li wrote:We got rid of coffee machines in 2001 or 2002 and simply use a pan. Once the water boils, it is taken off the heat and custom sized coffee grounds poured right in. A stir and while the mix is still whirling we set the pot on a log cut for holding the pan at a tilt... The combination of whirl and the low corner of the pot work together to help gravity sort stuff out

Are you tilting the pan to improve extraction or to let the grounds settle? because the time it takes for the water to go from a boiling 100ºC (212ºF) down to a drinkable 70º-80ºC (155º-175ºF) is long enough for a medium-fine grind to steep and release it's goodness. Stir right before pouring thru your favorite filter. Same time, temp, and grind size for french presses. Course grinds will withstand higher temps and longer steeps; and is ideal too for moka pot brewing.

Coffee is temp sensitive, too hot and it vaporizes the good stuff, too cold and you dont get much either. Steep with the lid on after a moment to flash off some.

If you have time (and are willing to make ahead), a long steep like cold brewing will extract the good stuff from medium to fine grinds. But someone already pointed out that's a bit of a misnomer because most "cold brew" is started with room temp or anywhere between 10 degrees above or below body temp (37°C or 98.6°F) water, it's the long steep that's cold.
 
paul wheaton
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I updated some notes in the first post.

A lot of emphasis on the measuring cup:  the anchor doesn't make a mess and all the others do.  We bought a second anchor.

A lot of emphasis on the strainer: the "forlife" brand that is linked has proven to be far better than the others.  It filters smaller stuff and it is less likely to get plugged up.   It cleans up better and ...   even though we have six different versions of this sort of thing, this one is the clear winner that is used the most often, by far.   You would think that we have so many that there would be no waiting, but people will wait to use this one.
 
gardener
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We have been K-cup free for 90 days now.  (First step of having a problem is admitting you have a problem!)

This is what my wife found in her search. It is working great for our needs of 2 cups each morning.

20190807_100250-756x1008.jpg
coffee filter
coffee filter
 
frank li
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pusang halaw wrote:

frank li wrote:We got rid of coffee machines in 2001 or 2002 and simply use a pan. Once the water boils, it is taken off the heat and custom sized coffee grounds poured right in. A stir and while the mix is still whirling we set the pot on a log cut for holding the pan at a tilt... The combination of whirl and the low corner of the pot work together to help gravity sort stuff out

Are you tilting the pan to improve extraction or to let the grounds settle? because the time it takes for the water to go from a boiling 100ºC (212ºF) down to a drinkable 70º-80ºC (155º-175ºF) is long enough for a medium-fine grind to steep and release it's goodness. Stir right before pouring thru your favorite filter. Same time, temp, and grind size for french presses. Course grinds will withstand higher temps and longer steeps; and is ideal too for moka pot brewing.

Coffee is temp sensitive, too hot and it vaporizes the good stuff, too cold and you dont get much either. Steep with the lid on after a moment to flash off some.

If you have time (and are willing to make ahead), a long steep like cold brewing will extract the good stuff from medium to fine grinds. But someone already pointed out that's a bit of a misnomer because most "cold brew" is started with room temp or anywhere between 10 degrees above or below body temp (37°C or 98.6°F) water, it's the long steep that's cold.



I find that not tilting the pan will produce a wave and circulation which re-mixes and suspends the grounds when tilted to decant. The low corner makes a pocket of packed grounds that does not kick up into a cloudy groundy mess no-one wants to drink when poured into a cup.
 
frank li
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wayne fajkus wrote:We have been K-cup free for 90 days now.  (First step of having a problem is admitting you have a problem!)

This is what my wife found in her search. It is working great for our needs of 2 cups each morning.

that looks suitable. Stainless and glass! No prastic.
 
wayne fajkus
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frank li wrote:

wayne fajkus wrote:We have been K-cup free for 90 days now.  (First step of having a problem is admitting you have a problem!)

This is what my wife found in her search. It is working great for our needs of 2 cups each morning.

that looks suitable. Stainless and glass! No prastic.



It does seem fragile. No, it is fragile. The vessel is all glass with a wood heat shield for pouring. The stainless cone filter was optional. It can use paper filters.
 
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Years ago we too got tired of the endless line of glass carafes on drip pots. Started french pressing, the glass ones broke and we got an all-stainless one. Works has worked for about 5 years now. DH loves his water kettle and I’d love to get rid of it. When it dies I will push hard to just use a pot. Less stuff hurrah!
 
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We drink coffee every day, at least once a day.

I have a Bodum french press for our every day morning coffee. It's the classic design one with all chrome and glass. (I believe it is called Chambord.) We are on the same one we bought over 11 years ago. Its been through two moves and has outlived 3 electric percolators. I've never had to replace anything on it. Theres finally a tiny rust spot on the bottom inside of the metal frame, where some of the chrome must have worn off. I'll have to try sealing it, because otherwise it is flawless.

My brother in law and a few of our friends have opted to purchase more flashy /modern looking Bodums with plastic cases and they dont survive, but our unassuming "original" chrome metal design seems to work just fine.

The other pot I have is a turkish coffee pot. They are very inexpensive small steel pots that have a tall pear shape and flat bottom. They use extra fine grind Turkish coffee. You make it over the stovetop and then pour/ladle into little saucered cups. It is served black. You don't drink any residual grinds on the bottom. Ive found that coffee that is roasted to a medium roast, and good for espresso is suitable for Turkish coffee.

Our travel coffee setup is currently a little pour-over cone, which uses unbleached paper bags. We also have used the coffee bags (like a tea bag but bigger) they have widely available in Europe to throw into a cup with boiling water and vigorously shake. It isn't the best and we aren't keen on paper filters, so I might try to source one of those steel mesh cones someone else kindly suggested on here.
 
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So it’s steeped like tea?? My method would be a pour
over. I do also have a 100% stainless fresh press. My pour over is amazing and the glass is intended for Uber HOT boiling water. Takes three minutes and the brew is coffee house exceptional. Our complete stainless steel French press is divine as well. Perks of having a coffee snob of a brother who frequents an eclectic organic small batch roaster in our area 😊 my Husband searched for days for a high quality open flame or fire percolating pot and found a sweet heavy duty stainless steel pot. Only glass is the little perking knob on the top. We found out that any enameled pots were actually toxic when heated.
I like the idea of a tea steeper and would work well for me in a pinch but I’d have to have multiples, as I’m a huge loose leaf tea drinker as well and tea drinkers can taste remnants of coffee from a mug or a steeper, even if thoroughly washed
 
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I did an Outward Bound course in MN back in the day and we made coffee over a campfire in our cooking pot. We'd boil the water, put the coffee in to steep, then swing the pot by the handle in big, full circles letting centrifugal force push the grounds to the bottom of the pot. There was no lid and it freaked me out the first time our instructor did it, but it worked. Never a drop was spilled and it was pretty fun to do.
 
Heather Scott
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Carol Denton wrote:I did an Outward Bound course in MN back in the day and we made coffee over a campfire in our cooking pot. We'd boil the water, put the coffee in to steep, then swing the pot by the handle in big, full circles letting centrifugal force push the grounds to the bottom of the pot. There was no lid and it freaked me out the first time our instructor did it, but it worked. Never a drop was spilled and it was pretty fun to do.



Sounds awesome! My Husband and I are moving to our homestead land in two months and in our plans for an outdoor kitchen we’d like to set up a fire pit with the ability to hang pots. This sounds like a fun idea. We love a good brew and willing to try many things to experience tasting different ways!
 
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It's hard to beat cold-brewed coffee for quality, cost and waste reduction:

6.5L cold water (I use 10L food-quality buckets from the hardware store and fill them to a marked line)
1lb bag of coarse-ground espresso (this is where you spend the money -- quality dark roast from a single grower. No mould!)
11-14 hours in the 'fridge or a coldish larder

Filter through a fine-mesh steel colander or similar and then through a t-shirt or speaker cloth bag or large-sized (compostable) coffee filter into a second identical bucket.

Below the steel mesh, I nest two large coffee filters in two cheapo spaghetti strainers for an extra-clear result, but you can use whatever. If there's any sediment (from fine-ground coffee, eg), let it settle out and pour off the good stuff.

Keeps in the cooler for weeks, heats in moments or drink cold when you need a quick caffeine hit. No bitterness: just strong, strong coffee. Freezes into ice cubes for months. Makes great iced coffee (or just emergency supply when you forget the weekly coffee brew
 
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This thread is fascinating! I thought I’d share the way I do it for my husband and myself each evening (in preparation for the next day’s drinking.)

Into my large stainless steel Dutch oven, I pour about 1/4 cup of freshly ground coffee. I fill my stainless steel teapot with about 2 1/2 quarts of filtered water and bring it to a boil, then pour all of it onto the ground coffee in the Dutch oven. Let that sit until it’s cool enough to put my hand against the pot without getting burned.

At this point, I have two filtering option: (1) my cone-shaped stainless steel coffee filter or (2) my small, fine-mesh (plastic or nylon?) filter from Cultures for Health.

Before filtering, I slowly drag the bowl of a cereal spoon all through the top inch of my newly-brewed coffee in the Dutch oven. This sinks the floaters. All of this coffee is filtered into my now-empty teapot. I set aside my 20 ounces in the fridge, and the rest stays on the stove, ready for my husband to heat it for his cup and thermos the next morning.
 
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Being in Europe, I may be misinformed. But do you guys really use Amazon? I had the impression they are treating their staff like  sh**, that they cause small businesses to break down, thus hurting your local community?
 
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I'm a horsegirl, not a cowgirl, and here's how I make my cold-brew horsegirl coffee:

1.  I pour my 2-day soaked coffee grounds (see #2 below) in my stainless steel French press, then top off with cold water if it's summer or just-boiled water if it's winter.  I like cold coffee and in particular like how mellow it is while still packing a caffeine punch.  Then I place my sieve on my coffee mug and pour.  Voila, done.

2.  I put about an inch of water in one of my insulated stainless steel cups (meant for camping but oh so stylin' for daily use), then two heaping scoops of coffee grounds.  I swirl the grounds around to make sure they're all wet, then cover and store in the fridge.  [Note: I used to grind my beans but I got lazy.  I need fast coffee so I can get out to feed the horses and scoop poop -- no time for grinding coffee].  Two days later I have instant cold-brew coffee, just add water (see #1 above).  When I'm more ambitious I have three days worth brewing, but two days is good enough. Two mugs stacked up fits in my fridge nicely, three days' worth takes up a larger footprint.
 
2020_06-02_MorningCoffee_LifStrandPhoto.png
[Thumbnail for 2020_06-02_MorningCoffee_LifStrandPhoto.png]
 
Posts: 11
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Hi all you lovely souls!!

I watched a video on Nepal street foods and they were making a chai tea or something like that and it was over a fire was similar to the Georgia coffee description.

Maybe it’s similar but it sure looked delicious!

I like coffee but Chai tea I think is my favorite!🌸
 
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Can put coffee in the strainer and use it like a teabag in the hot water, less mess yet.
 
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In 1976 we bought a 4 cup Farberware percolator.  We are still using it.  That is 44 years of use.  The 4 cup is nice for 2 people.  It forces us to get up off our backsides and get moving in the morning.   Otherwise, I am sure we would sit around and drink coffee until 4 PM.
 
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