Lif Strand

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since Sep 02, 2019
New Mexico USA zone 6
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Recent posts by Lif Strand

Leigh Tate wrote:Lif, by editorial reviews, I mean reviews by print and online publications (I probably should have used the word "magazines" in my initial post) in a similar genre as my book - homesteading, self-reliance, self-sufficiency, etc. I don't subscribe to magazines, so I have no clue as to what some of these might be. I already have peer reviews from fellow authors, editors, and homesteaders, which I opted to put in a "Praise For" section on the first two pages, rather than do blurbs on the back cover. Of course, I have staff here at Permies willing to do reviews for me, plus a few specifically chosen homestead bloggers of influence as well. That seemed a better route to go than Reedsy, which doesn't seem to have anyone geared toward my niche. I thought for this book I'd expand on what I've done in the past and see if I can get something to add under "editorial reviews" on this book's Amazon page. I could use my peer reviews there, which I may end up doing, but wanted to see if I could add some other kinds of publications to my list.


So what you're looking for is names of magazines and other publications that might want to review your books. I assume you know the biggies: Mother Jones, Mother Earth News, Countryside & Small Stock Journal. I've subscribed to those at various times over the years.  I think Countryside is my favorite of the three.
1 month ago
If, by “editorial reviews" you mean endorsements such as are found on front covers, back covers, inside in the front matter of books, or on your book's Amazon page, that's one thing. But if you are talking about book reviews by professional reviewers and that are found in other publications, that's another.  

When it comes to endorsements, you will have to make a list of people whose endorsement you'd love to have gracing your book's covers.  You do this by finding other books, or blogs, magazines, podcasts, etc. in the field (homesteading, in your case, but it could be anything relevant), and then researching till you get contact info for the author.  You could also ask anyone who is an expert in homesteading or related field -- but who isn't necessarily a writer.  Then you've got to put together a letter describing your book and asking for the endorsement and get that letter (individualized for each person) out via snail mail, email, Messaging, or -- best of all -- asking in person and having the letter available to hand over.  You will want to be able to immediately send a copy of your finished & polished manuscript to the author/blogger/expert, so make sure your book is written before asking anyone to endorse it!  You might check out https://selfpublishingadvice.org/how-to-get-editorial-reviews-self-published-book/ for a good idea of a letter.

If you're talking reviews by professionals, then a good way to start is with anyone who's written a review of your original book (a positive review, of course!).  After that, go to anyone who reviews books -- bloggers, podcasters, media columnists -- even professional reviewers that you might have to pay for reviews.  (For book bloggers try researching https://blog.reedsy.com/book-review-blogs/) If you go the paid professional route, you can find some of the review publications by Googling "* Book Review" (use the quotes and the asterisk as shown).  Their websites will instruct you on how to go about it.  Most important of all, do your homework: find out what the reviewers require in order to review before you ask them for a review!

In general, for professional reviewers you'll need to be prepared with information that will help the reviewer decide whether or not to review.  Be prepared to provide the following info:
>> Title, publisher, date of release, and genre
>> The cover copy or a brief description of the book.
>> Your book's target audience, and comparable books (books like yours that would share the same target audience).  
>> A summary or outline or table of contents of the book

Note that you need to get your endorsements and reviews early on -- ask well before your book will be published!
1 month ago

Candace Williams wrote:I long to visit Scotland because I have family roots there on my Father's side. Also hubby and I have been playing some Celtic music. There is so much emphasis on Ireland and not much is shared about Scottish music, food,culture which has made me curious.
 Also what time of year would those of you who live there believe would be best for visiting? I had never heard of the midges you describe.



I've come across some great Scottish folk/rock music.  I love it!  I find it in a newsletter I get called Music Scotland, which introduces new music across genres, just as long as the band is Scottish.  Check out musicscotland.com to subscribe.
1 month ago

Skandi Rogers wrote:Here's a few pictures to enjoy.



I've heard about those midgies!  Thanks for the reminder.  And thank you so much for posting the photos -- now I really REALLY want to go!
1 month ago
It's Scotland I want to visit -- maybe for a good long while -- and I don't know why. It's always called to me, which is kind of funny since I believe I photosynthesize in order to thrive (why I live in the US Southwest).  But Ireland, Wales, and England are where it seems to me the magical gardens grow. Green places that get actual rain (I've gotten approximately 3" of rain since last January and it's rather parched here right now). Flowers. Ferns. Mushrooms. Somehow in my mind Ireland and the UK are never humid, are always lush, and there are little winged beings hiding under leaves and petals that aren't biting insects.

Perhaps I should stay home so as to not risk disillusionment, but a girl can dream, can't she?

1 month ago

Anne Miller wrote:

Source

This sounds like fun! I will give an apple to a person posting in this thread after this post.  So post something to make me happy so I feel the post deserves an apple.

The best new thread to the UK and Ireland forum get a piece of Pie



It's Scotland I want to visit and I don't know why. It's always called to me, which is kind of funny since I believe I photosynthesize in order to thrive (why I live in the US Southwest).  But Ireland, Wales, and England are where it seems to me the magical gardens grow. Green places that get actual rain (I've gotten approximately 3" of rain since last January and it's rather parched here right now). Flowers. Ferns. Mushrooms. Somehow in my mind Ireland and the UK are never humid, are always lush, and there are little winged beings hiding under leaves and petals that aren't biting insects.

Perhaps I should stay home so as to not risk disillusionment, but a girl can dream, can't she?
1 month ago

Douglas Alpenstock wrote:In that case, a welder could probably build you a heavy duty pellet basket from his scrap pile, at a fraction of the cost.



Good idea - I'll ask around!
2 months ago

Douglas Alpenstock wrote:I would personally be cautious. I think they would burn very quickly -- basically like kindling.

If small amounts were used, you would be constantly opening the door to add more. That's a pain, and it's not good for your indoor air quality either.

If larger amounts were used, I would worry about them burning so fast and hot that it could warp or crack the stove. In a fully airtight stove, you would have some control over that; but modern wood stoves aren't just a steel box -- they're pretty carefully engineered for the intended fuel, which is split wood.

In an emergency, if that was the only fuel available, I would take it slow, observe and adjust, and make it work.



Thank you.  From what I've gleaned on the web, using a pellet basket bulks up the fuel so the whole load doesn't burn any faster than fuel wood does.  I don't have a pellet basket so I haven't tried it -- they're not cheap!  

My wood stove is no state-of-the art thing, it's a 55 gal steel drum on its side that's been converted to a wood stove using a kit for that purpose.  I have to open it to feed the fire every few hours no matter what.  
I'm exploring the pellet idea because I'm tired of the mess from the firewood, tired of having to have it delivered (I can get the pellets myself) and tired of the prices -- I could get 40 bags of pellets for a short cord of pinon pine, which is awful stuff to burn unless you've got something else (harder wood and more expensive) to burn with it.
2 months ago
I'm looking for information on the use of wood pellets instead of (or in addition to) logs in a wood stove. I Googled wood pellet baskets but most of what I found was older info and confusing.

I'd like to hear from folks who have actually done it.  I'd like to know if burning wood pellets in a wood stove is a good idea or not.

If it's a good idea, I'd like recommendations for baskets.  

Thanks!


PS - what's available around here is pine pellets, if that makes any difference.
2 months ago

Joshua Myrvaagnes wrote:My first preference is to find permies for the job, but anyone who can stomach the script is welcome to get in contact.


If you don't get permies, repost and I'll give your addy to some non-permie friends.
2 months ago