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Planting Trees in Memory of Notre Dame

 
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In the Notre Dame thread, we had the idea to replant the 17,000 trees that were burnt when Notre Dame burnt. 13,000 of those were slow-growing oak trees. Can we replant them all? Not all of us live in places where oaks can grow, but maybe those of us that do, can plant an oak or three. They're slow-growing, so they won't take up much space for many, many more years. They could be planted in a pot, in the woods, in a friends yard, wherever!

If you plant a tree, take a picture and post the picture here, and say what you planted, and "vote" in the below poll, one apple for each tree planted (so, if you plant 3 oaks, you'd put 3 on "oak," AND 3 on "any tree variety"). If you need more apples, ask me, and I'll send you some!

 
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I was reading today that the trees used to build the truss system for the roof of the Notre Dame cathedral were exceptionally large oak trees that were estimated to be 300 to 500 years old when they were cut down and milled.  Given the fact that that part of the roof was built about 700 years ago, those trees would have sprouted around the year 800 to 900.  Crazy.  They estimate that upwards of 25 hectors of old-growth forest were cut down just to build that roof structure.

Now its all charcoal and smoke, blowing somewhere over Russia by now.

I plant an acorn or three every so often.  It's part of my gift to the future generation.  I hope my great-grandkids sit under the shade of those oaks and appreciate the gift.  It would have been   But I'm not sure that the people of Paris want to wait until the year 2400 to harvest that wood and rebuild their roof from the trees I've been planting.

Here's my proposal:  nobody on earth should be allowed to be buried/cremated/memorialized until their family plants 50 trees in honor of them and provides for their ongoing survival.  Fair enough?  With 7.5 billion people on earth, that would be 375 billion trees planted in the next 75 years or so.  
 
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Count me in.  The world needs more trees.  What a beautiful excuse.  

My favourite trees in town were donated to the city by France, one tree for every local lad who died liberating France in the first world war.  All are dead who remember the event, but the trees (and the plaque describing why they were planted) is a beautiful part of our city's history.

It is a beautiful way to honour and mourn the event.
 
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I put three acorns into pots in the fall. I'd like to get cork oak going as well. I might be acquiring more land (fingers crossed!) and if I do I plan on planting oak trees. Remember sudden oak death syndrome. What varieties are resistant to that?
 
James Landreth
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If oaks don't work out I might just plant chestnuts and walnuts in honor of notre dame. Some cursory research didn't turn up any oaks that are resistant to Phytophthora ramorum (sudden oak death). It's spreading in Europe and the west coast of the United States (it's reached Oregon at the time of this writing).

Weird world we live in.
 
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I planted a bunch of trees about 2 months ago... would those count for this? Also... are you wanting these to be only trees we planted because of this initiative or do trees we were already planning on planting count?
 
r ranson
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I think it's up to the individual.
Maybe not trees already planted.
But maybe if you were going to plant them anyway, change the meaning of the tree to be in memory of this event.   Same tree, different meaning.

I think I might make a marker to say that the trees were planted in memory of ... so when the next stewards of this land arrive, they will know that this tree had meaning to me.
 
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My husband and I will each plant at least 13 Bur Oaks in honor of Notre Dame.  Easier if 1000 permies each plant 13 Oaks than 13 permies each plant 1000.  

Source for seeds:  https://sheffields.com/
 
Nicole Alderman
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I was reading today that the trees used to build the truss system for the roof of the Notre Dame cathedral were exceptionally large oak trees that were estimated to be 300 to 500 years old when they were cut down and milled.  Given the fact that that part of the roof was built about 700 years ago, those trees would have sprouted around the year 800 to 900.  Crazy.  They estimate that upwards of 25 hectors of old-growth forest were cut down just to build that roof structure.

Now its all charcoal and smoke, blowing somewhere over Russia by now.

I plant an acorn or three every so often.  It's part of my gift to the future generation.  I hope my great-grandkids sit under the shade of those oaks and appreciate the gift.  It would have been   But I'm not sure that the people of Paris want to wait until the year 2400 to harvest that wood and rebuild their roof from the trees I've been planting.



Just think, if in the 1300s when they started building Norte Dame, they had planted oak trees for when it needed them, those trees would now be 600-700 years old. If we plant now, the trees will hopefully be old enough for when new renovations need to be done to Notre Dame in 300+ years. We can't travel back in time to plant the oaks and other timbers, but we can travel forward, in a way, to help ensure there are huge trees. Those trees will sequester carbon their whole lives, and can be used for architecture if future generations need them for that. We don't know what the future will hold, but we can still do whatever we can to build and grow a better future world.
 
Nicole Alderman
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r ranson wrote:I think it's up to the individual.
Maybe not trees already planted.
But maybe if you were going to plant them anyway, change the meaning of the tree to be in memory of this event.   Same tree, different meaning.



I like the idea of using a tree you were already planning to plant and dedicating it to Notre Dame. I've already planted my trees for the year, so I've got an excuse reason to buy and plant another tree. It doesn't take much to persuade us permies to plant more trees, does it? :D


I think I might make a marker to say that the trees were planted in memory of ... so when the next stewards of this land arrive, they will know that this tree had meaning to me.



Ooooh! I LOVE the idea of making a marker. There's a thread somewhere about how to make permanent metal markers for cheep. *Wanders off to find it*
 
Nicole Alderman
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Tyler Ludens
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"in the aftermath of the French Revolution Notre Dame was damaged and used as storage buildings for some years. After the French Revolution, it took almost sixty years to rebuild the cathedral. At the time the wooden beams supporting the roof were replaced and in wise foresight, new oak trees were planted near Versailles, outside the city of Paris. The now 200-year-old trees, still there, could be used to rebuild the roof."

https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidbressan/2019/04/17/how-notre-dame-can-be-rebuilt/#76f0e0135a9c
 
r ranson
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I'm ordering 8 mulberry trees that should arrive after Easter (shipping living things over the holidays is a pain in the arse)

Now to find some acorns!  
 
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Sweet idea

So are we talking about gathering acorns from healthy ( local to each of us) trees and planting them, maybe potting them first and then planting?
Oaks are everywhere here and I don't think I would want to introduce a type that wasn't already here or import a tree from elsewhere.

I just dug holes for a dozen blueberries so probably not planting trees this week.

I do have several potted pears, apples and hazelnuts popping up from seeds that will need planting in the ground soon....and two pecans that need moving to our son's land....would a transplant be  muddying the idea?...and a pot full of fig cuttings to divide and get in the ground...I know the idea was for a long lived tree though.

Just thinking out loud
 
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I have today planted two buckthorn trees.I would have planted them anyway but now the trees are dedicated to the Notre Dome.Need one more apple to wote please!
Picture tomorrow.
 
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It is the sea-buckthorn with delicious small berries,not to be mistaken with the other buckthorn.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Judith Browning wrote:
I do have several potted pears, apples and hazelnuts popping up from seeds that will need planting in the ground soon....and two pecans that need moving to our son's land....would a transplant be  muddying the idea?...and a pot full of fig cuttings to divide and get in the ground...I know the idea was for a long lived tree though.



Lifespan of Apple, 100-200 years.  Of Pecan, 300 years.  Not too shabby!
 
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I'm going to revisit my acre planting scheme to see how to lay out the chestnuts I'm planning to plant.  I'm thinking about perhaps laying them out in a cathedral format, perhaps in the footprint of Notre Dame.  I need to rewalk that area to see if the lay of the land supports that large a planting footprint.  I've always loved living cathedral plantings.  I like that chestnuts are strong, rot resistant, drop a lovely crop and can live 1000 years.  If this works out it will be planted out behind my house, through the woods surrounding my stream, then up a slope to a stone wall, then the central path will run through the chestnut cathedral.  Perhaps I can get it all planted before Notre Dame's restoration is completed!  (it will be a race....they are determined to move at break-neck speed!!!)
 
Tyler Ludens
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"The Chestnut Cathedral"

How cool is that!

 
Greg Martin
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I don't think it likely, but how amazing would it be if I could get my hands on charcoal from the roof to christen the soil with?  I can and will make my own but I would love to get some from Notre Dame if there is any possible way.
 
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Sea-buckthorn is real nice,they need to be planted in pairs with one male and one female.May the love flows.

20190418_073842.jpg
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Sea-buckthorn
 
Tyler Ludens
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Another timber tree with a wide range is Bois d'Arc/Osage Orange.  
 
James Landreth
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Next week is my last round of tree planting for the year. I'll be planting 8 chestnut trees and 18 various kinds of walnuts (butternut, heartnut, and English). I'll also be adding some seaberries (sea buckthorn), goumi berries, and autumn olive. I'm excited :-)
 
Tyler Ludens
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James Landreth wrote:18 various kinds of walnuts



Walnut lifespan: 150 - 250 years!
 
Greg Martin
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Planting is just getting going for me now here in Maine.  Today I got 3 goumi seedlings delivered and now 3 goumi are planted by my Chinese chestnut trees whom they will nurse with their nitrogen fixing skills.  I went with seedlings as I've heard they have a decent amount of variability and that suites my curiosity.   Many more trees coming :)
 
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I just planted three different varieties of willow yesterday. They're such beautiful and useful trees to me.

I plan to use the occasional trimmings to make willow water to be used in the process of creating many more future trees!
 
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Excellent idea!!!

I planted some chestnuts as part of this 600 year project. Will do the same with oak. Have some fig trees being started & those will arrive when they're ready. All will be dedicated to Notre Dame. Sad to see something like this happen to such a fine historical work of art & architecture. Will vote & send pix when there are some new trees to see.
 
Daron Williams
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I'm currently designing a restoration project for my job... the soils are great for our native oak. I think I will try to pick some areas to reserve for oaks. They would be a nice addition to the site and it would add something special to the design. Plus I have some other properties that I can gather acorns from next fall so even if we don't get funding for the design I can at least plant the acorns

On my own property I think I will pick out one of my future hedgerows to dedicate to Notre Dame. I should be able to plant it next winter if I can get it prepped over this spring/summer.

Also, if anyone in Western WA / OR want some acorns for our native oaks just let me know towards the end of summer. I can gather some of the properties I manage and send to you.
 
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Cool idea! I have a stack of little trees sitting here waiting to get planted :) And I looked at the 100 year tags thread, and am getting a metal embosser. I have been wondering how to tag trees easily.  Yay for good ideas!! I'll try to remember to put them in the count.

Greg: your cathedral sounds COOL!!

I need to find a bur oak and get some of it's acorns, I know there are some around here. I have them on my want list for other reasons (their bark is a type of cork.)
 
Tyler Ludens
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Got my Bur Oak acorns (2 lbs).  I need to cold stratify them and then it will take awhile to plant them all.

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Not sure how many of the threes/shrubs I planted today count. Ten of each type, from Missouri Conservation Tree Sales. I told them all stories as I planted them.
The Wild Plums got told about the tracery of light through the stained glass windows, and about the aisle, so long and elegant to walk. They were planted in two rows, making an aisle.
The Aronia were planted in a C shape around a stump, and they were told about alcoves, how there are statues of saints in the alcoves, and people come to pray there. They will get a saint statue on the stump when we find one we like. Maybe a saint of the flowers or something. I'll have to look it up.
The Beauty Berries were planted all over the place, and they were told about the chapels on the grounds of the big cathedrals, each one lovely of itself, and a special place to go and be still with your thoughts.

The Wild Plum Aisle



The Aronia Alcove



The Beauty Berry Chapels



I'll put apples on the poll, if I know how many of these count. They are not all trees, but they were all planted with intent, and told why they were being planted where they were.
 
r ranson
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I planted three mulberries this afternoon.  

Reading about this tree, I discovered that it's an excellent timber tree and is often used for furniture building.  
 
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They don't really count as they're quite small, but I planted 4 Honey Berry shrubs this week. I'm surrounded by ~150ft cedars and Doug Firs, so no place for more big trees at the moment.
It does appear that my 3 Ziziphus jujuba seedlings made it through the horrible Feb. we had. They looked sooo... dead, but are putting out little leaves near their bases. I will try to get them planted, as they grow large enough to call a tree.
Daron, would those acorns be suitable for Vancouver Isl? If so would they be allowed across the border? There is one area where oaks from acorns might have a chance.
 
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It just so happens I ordered 50 bur oaks , 100 norway spruce and 100 beaked hazelnuts in January before Notre Dame's fire.  I will be replanting a hedgerow that was elm and ash that have died.  I will use the norway spruce to nurse the oaks and the beaked hazelnuts as understory.  The plan is in 25 years the spruce will become 2x4s and the oaks will be released to continue to grow tall and straight.  

Does anyone know this story?

http://blog.longnow.org/02014/12/31/humans-and-trees-in-long-term-partnership/

 
Pearl Sutton
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I did know that story!! Pie for you for knowing it too!
I like that they mention cork oaks, the reason I have bur oak on my want list is it makes cork too, and I want stoppers for my herb bottles. Cork oak won't grow where I am but bur oak does :D
 
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I finished this year's planting. Have the sore back to prove it. Robaxacet has been a good friend this week.
100 Norway spruce
50 Burr Oak
8 red oaks
18 sugar maples.
50 Beaked Hazelnuts
10 White Spruce and 10 Butternuts free from local conservation authority.

246 new seedlings on my property! I wonder how much C02 they will sequester over time?

 
 
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Last vote in apple poll was on July 11, 2019
 
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