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My property is mostly wet or shaded, and often wet AND shaded, so I've gotten to find out a what sort of edible plants grow in these conditions. There's surprisingly quite a few. I thought it might be nice to have a thread that lists all the plants I know of, for my own reference as well as yours if you need it! If you know of any plants that I've missed, please mention them, and I'll try to add them!

Key:
Blue: non-native to PNW
BOLD: Plants I have personally seen growing in these conditions in the PNW, and am familiar with.


Shady:

Herbaceous Layer:

  • Wood/Wild strawberry[/color] (Fragaria vesca) yummy little strawberries:
  • Wild violet[/color] (Viola odorata) edible, tasty flower
  • Bunchberry(Cornus canadensis)
  • Wood sorrel (Oxalis acetosella): In the damper areas. Looks like cute little shamrocks and tastes like bright sunshine--a sweet and lemony flavor.
  • Sheep sorrel (Rumex acetosella): also seems to tolerate shade. A sweet, "lemony" leaf. Very tasty!
  • Miner's Lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata): Tasty, mild green.
  • Siberian Miner's Lettuce (Claytonia sibirica): Sometimes tasty, sometimes tastes like dirt. The one's growing wild on my property taste like dirt . Make sure you're getting a tasty variety.
  • [/color]
  • Hostas (Hosta): Young shoots supposedly cook up like asparagus! I can't wait until my plants are big enough that I can eat some. Some varieties like/need more shade than others.
  • Ramps (Allium tricoccum)
  • Ramsons/Wild Garlic (Allium ursinum) Prefer semi-shade
  • Mint: loves to spread. Beware!
  • Mushrooms!
  • Lady Fern (Athyrium filix-femina) fiddleheads are edible
  • Ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris) edible fiddleheads


  • Vines Layer:

  • Trailing blackberry: Not really a vine, but kind of takes up that zone
  • Hardy kiwis (Actinidia arguta) Supposedly they don't mind part-shade, though I haven't tried to grow them yet.


  • Shrub Layer:  

  • Red Huckleberry (Vaccinium parvifolium): Likes to grow on WesternRed cedar stumps and debri. Will fruit in full sun to dappled light/part-shade, maybe even full shade.
  • Salal (Gaultheria shallon)
  • Oregon Grape (Mahonia aquifolium)Edible berried. Roots are medicinal, like Goldenseal
  • Nettle(Urtica dioica): Seems to handle shady and part shade rather well. Tasty leaves. Some manage to eat the raw without getting stung. I cook mine! Probably only want to eat 1-2 times per week, as it can cause damage to kidneys if consumed in LARGE amounts. Very nutritious plant, and a good source of protein, too!
  • Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis): Doesn't seem to fruit in deep shade, but the leaves are edible. In part/open shade, it makes little red to yellow berries (color depends on the plant) that are generally slightly sweet and watery. Not the best berry, but ripens before any other berry on my property, so a lot get eaten! Makes a great hedge, and can compete against himallayan blackberry if you  help it out.
  • Thimbleberries (Rubus parviflorus)Sweet, soft, velvety berries. They get dried out if in too much sun &/or heat &/or dry weather (I haven't quite figured out which one). Seems to do best in part shade--like 2-6 hours a day, or dappled light
  • Currant: My sink currant fruits in part shade, and grows in dappled forest (might fruit there, too.) Not sure about other currants, though...
  • Blackcap raspberry: supposedly likes part shade. I haven't tested this though. The berries are delicious.
  • Gooseberry
  • Devil's Club: Shoots are edible, but i haven't tried them. The plant is medicinal. It's giant and thorny, though...
  • Jostaberry (Ribes × nidigrolaria) Was growing tall and producing fruit in a mostly shady part of my mother's garden. Berries are yummy, but take processing, as you have to take off the dried petals from the bottom of the berry.


  • Small Tree/Tall Shrub Layer:

  • Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis)oesn't fruit in full shade, but grows there and fruits in dappled light.
  • Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus): Fruits in part shade
  • Red Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa): fruits in part shade on my property. Berries not edible unless processed carefully. Even then, not everyone agrees that they're edible. Flowers are edible.
  • Serviceberry/Saskatoon(Amelanchier): Mine is grow in part shade. Not sure if they'll fruit, though. Mine is growing but has yet to bloom after three years...
  • Vine Maple ()Acer circinatum: The flowers and leaves are edible...and if you found one big enough, you could tap it...
  • Hazelnuts: My Beaked Hazelnut (Corylus cornuta) is growing in part shade





  • Wet: (Some can handle being really wet all year round, other's just handle seasonal wetness--you'd see them in a wetlands, or growing a foot from a stream, but not in a pond)

    Herbaceous Layer:

  • Arrowhead/Wapato
  • Camas
  • Cattail
  • Water chestnut
  • Wood sorrel
  • Mushrooms!


  • Vines Layer:

  • Trailing blackberry: Not really a vine, but kind of takes up that zone


  • Shrub Layer:

  • Skunk/stink currant (Ribes glandulosum): Smells of pine, and berries taste slightly sweet and piney too. An interesting flavor--my husband loves them.
  • AroniaMine seems unnaffected by being flooded during the winter/early spring, and is even blooming and forming berries this year in part shade!


  • Small Tree/Tall Shrub Layer:

  • Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis)oesn't fruit in full shade, but grows there and fruits in dappled light.
  • Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus): Fruits in part shade
  • Red Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa): fruits in part shade on my property. Berries not edible unless processed carefully. Even then, not everyone agrees that they're edible. Flowers are edible.
  • Serviceberry/Saskatoon(Amelanchier): Mine seemed entirely unnaffected by being drowned for multiple weeks during the winter and sprin. Mine also is growing in part shade. Not sure if they'll fruit, though. Mine's growing but has yet to bloom after three years...



  • Canopy Tree:

  • Red Alder: You can tap it, but supposedly doesn't taste good. Leaves and catkins are also technically edible. Haven't tried them yet.
  • Big Leaf Maple: Can't handle very wet soils, but can handle the drier areas of a wetlands. Sap is edible (boil it down to syrup--yum!) and the flowers are edible and not too bad tasting
  • chinkapin oaks(Quercus muehlenbergii)The trees supposedly do good in dappled shade and moist ground. Acorns reportedly don't need to be leached of tannins,and the tree produces in just a few years.
  • Pecans(Carya illinoinensis)Grows in floodplains in Missouri. I don't know how well they do in the Pacific Northwest, though



  • Shady AND Wet:

    Herbaceous Layer:

  • Wasabi
  • Wood/Wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) yummy little strawberries:
  • Wild violet (Viola odorata) edible, tasty flower
  • Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
  • Wood sorrel (Oxalis acetosella): In the damper areas. Looks like cute little shamrocks and tastes like bright sunshine--a sweet and lemony flavor.
  • Sheep sorrel(Rumex acetosella): also seems to tolerate shade. A sweet, "lemony" leaf. Very tasty!
  • Miner's Lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata): Tasty, mild green.
  • Siberian Miner's Lettuce (Claytonia sibirica): Sometimes tasty, sometimes tastes like dirt. The one's growing wild on my property taste like dirt . Make sure you're getting a tasty variety.
  • Licorice Fern: Grows on mostly maple trees that are growing in shady wet areas
  • Mushrooms! As long as you're not trying to grow them in a puddle, that is!


  • Vines Layer:

  • Trailing blackberry: Not really a vine, but kind of takes up that zone
  • Boysenberry:
  • Licorice fern: Not a vine, but it grows up on trees, so it thought I'd mention it here, too.


  • Shrub Layer:

  • Red Huckleberry (Vaccinium parvifolium): Likes to grow on WesternRed cedar stumps and debri. Will fruit in full sun to dappled light/part-shade, maybe even full shade. Will grow in wetlands if growing on a log raised above the water
  • stink currant (probably other currants as well)
  • Nettle(Urtica dioica): Seems to handle shady and part shade rather well. Tasty leaves. Some manage to eat the raw without getting stung. I cook mine! Probably only want to eat 1-2 times per week, as it can cause damage to kidneys if consumed in LARGE amounts. Very nutritious plant, and a good source of protein, too!
  • Cascade Huckleberry ()Vaccinium deliciosum: Only partial shade
  • Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis)oesn't fruit in full shade, but grows there and fruits in dappled light.
  • Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus): Fruits in part shade
  • [/list]
  • Red Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa): fruits in part shade on my property. Berries not edible unless processed carefully. Even then, not everyone agrees that they're edible. Flowers are edible.
  • Devil's Club: Shoots are edible, but i haven't tried them. The plant is medicinal. It's giant and thorny, though...
  • Sword fern: Supposedly the tubors are edible, but I haven't tried them
  • Lady fern: Supposedly, the "fiddleheads" are edible, but I haven't tried them.
  • Currant: My sink currant fruits in part shade, and grows in dappled forest (might fruit there, too.) Not sure about other currants, though...
  • Blackcap raspberry (Rubus leucodermis): supposedly likes part shade. I haven't tested this though. The berries are delicious.
  • Gooseberry



  • Small Tree/Tall Shrub Layer (I.e. things taller than I can reach):

  • Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis)oesn't fruit in full shade, but grows there and fruits in dappled light.
  • Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus): Fruits in part shade
  • Red Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa): fruits in part shade on my property. Berries not edible unless processed carefully. Even then, not everyone agrees that they're edible. Flowers are edible.
  • Serviceberry/Saskatoon(Amelanchier): supposedly grow in part shade. Not sure if they'll fruit, though, Mine's growing but has yet to bloom after three years...
  • Vine Maple: The flowers and leaves are edible...and if you found one big enough, you could tap it...
  • Cascara Buckrhorn: Technically edible berries, but more medicinal. It's a diuretic. So, if you need to go, some berries might help... It's also a great tree for bees. Mine is growing on the edges of my wetlands and the edges of my forest.
  • Serviceberry/Saskatoon(Amelanchier): Mine is grow in part shade. Not sure if they'll fruit, though. Mine is growing but has yet to bloom after three years...


  • Canopy Tree:

  • Red Alder: You can tap it, but supposedly doesn't taste good. Leaves and catkins are also technically edible. Haven't tried them yet.
  • chinkapin oaks(Quercus muehlenbergii)The trees supposedly do good in dappled shade and moist ground. Acorns reportedly don't need to be leached of tannins,and the tree produces in just a few years.


  • If you know of any other wet and/or shade tollerant plants, please share them!
    COMMENTS:
     
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    Nicole Alderman wrote:

  • Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus): Fruits in part shade



  • Thank you so much for this tidbit. I'm a bit obsessed with thimbleberries, but I've had some difficulty pinning down their habits. I've finally got one of my own in the ground and I really hope it goes well.
     
    master steward
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    You're welcome! I've found that my thimbleberries will fruit in full sun, but as summer progresses and it gets hotter, most of the berries dry up. Meanwhile, the ones in the woods/part shade, have delicious berries all through their bearing season.

    I LOVE thimbleberries. I've found that my in full sun grew quickly over the years, and now I have to thin it. So, I take the thinnings and plant them in my woods and hedges. I love that I have an abundance of them, and hope yours do well. If they start looking sad, they might need more water. But, even if they look like they died (a few of my transplants did that a few years ago), they will probably spring back the following year (as mine did)
     
    gardener
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    What do you think about larger food producing trees on a wet site? I've heard that American persimmons, black walnuts, and apples grafted onto pacific crabapple can do ok depending on the site
     
    gardener
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    How about the chokeberry?

    https://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aronia+melanocarpa

    A "superfood" that is expensive to buy, they seem good for this list.

    I went to Growing Value Permaculture Nursery in Cincinnati looking for nitrogen fixing shrubbery, and I found them, but my wife found the Aronia.
    She liked that they don't mind standing in water.
    We have that at our yarden, so we  bought two for the yarden, but I've not had time to plant them (I'll need a pick axe,such is the soil).
    They are sitting in the shade,in a dishpan of water, visibly thriving!
     
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    I've tried Ostrich fern fiddle heads for the first time this spring there were also Lady fern fiddle heads in the same spot but the Ostrich are supposed to be superior because they don't have hairs that need to be removed.

    Growing not far from the fiddle heads was False Solomon's Seal, I picked a few shoots but didn't get to try them.
    A fair bit of Devils Club was also in the same area but I wasn't aware of it's medicinal value till this thread. - Thanks

    Learned about the fiddle heads and False Solomon's Seal on a little trip hosted by Steph and Teresa of https://adventuresinself-sufficiency.blogspot.com/
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    William Bronson wrote: How about the chokeberry?

    https://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aronia+melanocarpa

    A "superfood" that is expensive to buy, they seem good for this list.

    I went to Growing Value Permaculture Nursery in Cincinnati looking for nitrogen fixing shrubbery, and I found them, but my wife found the Aronia.
    She liked that they don't mind standing in water.
    We have that at our yarden, so we  bought two for the yarden, but I've not had time to plant them (I'll need a pick axe,such is the soil).
    They are sitting in the shade,in a dishpan of water, visibly thriving!



    I'll add that to the list! It's not native (I need to get around to color-coding the native vs non-native plants!). My aronia also seemed to do great despite getting flooded for a week. It's also bearing fruit in part shade. WOOT WOOT!

    Speaking of things that don't mind being drowned, my service berry bush also survived and seems to be unharmed by also being flooded for a week!
     
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    I have one patch of very wet soil and the vietnamese mint thrives in it, it can be used as a substitute for fresh coriander in cooking. When you go to a vietnamese restaurant and order a bowl of pho they give you a bunch of it and you can pick the leaves off and pop it in your tasty noodle soup.
     
    pollinator
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    Thimbleberries may be my favorite food.

    Devil's club has many medicinal uses (according to Pojar, the "devil" is a derogatory reference to its use by native shamans/medicine people doing "non-christian" things with it). When very young (before thorns emerge or harden), the leaf buds are delicious and juicy, tasting like a carrot-radish combo.
     
    pollinator
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    The native pecans we have in Missouri can stand wet soils much better than black walnut. They thrive on flood ground. All the pecan farms here are on flood ground.

    Grafting them or buying grafted trees is worth the expense.  Grafted trees produce nuts 5-10 years sooner and a named variety of northern pecan will have bigger nuts. We don’t like thin shelled southern pecans as well here. Our pecans have a higher oil content and more flavor.  People from farther south may disagree. Of course, if you’re too far south for northern varieties, then southern varieties will be better. I don’t know if they like wet soils or not. I think some varieties are from Texas and might like it dryer.
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    James Landreth wrote:What do you think about larger food producing trees on a wet site? I've heard that American persimmons, black walnuts, and apples grafted onto pacific crabapple can do ok depending on the site



    I honestly don't know! I had a plum tree that was doing alright next to a wetlands, but it got choked out by salmonberries before it got too big. Apples grafted onto pacific crabapple sounds like a good combination! I'd love to know if any one has any personal experience with large trees that can stand wet feet!
     
    William Bronson
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    I've been lusting after dwarf chinkapin oaks.
    Ive read they are good in dappled shade and moist ground.
    The acorns reportedly don't need to be leached of tannins,and the tree produces in just a few years.
    There is even a history of chestnuts being grafted onto oaks!

     
    James Landreth
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    I've heard mayhaws can do ok in the Pacific Northwest, both on drier sites and on wet ones. Burnt Ridge carries two varieties that supposedly do well here. I planted both this February and they seem healthy. They look like small apple trees. I'm hoping that more can be done with them than just make jelly, which is what people traditionally use them for. I've heard of people using them in bundt cakes
     
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    Red Alder: You can tap it, but supposedly doesn't taste good. Leaves and catkins are also technically edible. Haven't tried them yet.



    There's an excess of red alder on our property, so I've been experimenting. I carved some taps this year and drilled to collect some sap. I have no experience with this so only managed to successfully tap 3 trees. I collected about 8 litres which is now being stored in the freezer.

    The sap tastes a little like mineral water, with just a tiny hint of sweetness. The sugar content in red alder (40:1) is half that of sugar maple (20:1), which would make boiling for syrup a task.

    I'm planning on using it for a primitive "tree beer" this year when the spruce tips come out.

    Also of note, the catkins are supposed to be high in vitamins and protein - which make them a good survival food, but they're extremely bitter and taste of citrusy chlorophyll. Might try to pickle some next winter/spring, as I think with some salt and vinegar they may make a nice substitute for capers!

    This is a fantastic wiki for me, having recently moved to the PNW, I'll definitely add some of my findings after this planting season!
     
    pollinator
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    FIRST: WOW! This is so very useful. Now to figure out which of these will grow in Oklahoma in a Hickory-Oak forest! Thank you SO VERY MUCH!

    James Landreth wrote:What do you think about larger food producing trees on a wet site? I've heard that American persimmons, black walnuts, and apples grafted onto pacific crabapple can do ok depending on the site



    I can tell you that wild persimmons in Oklahoma prefer to grow right next to wet-weather and running creeks. They typically are not IN the stream, but they are so close to it that their roots definitely run under it. They spread in areas where water stands.
     
    Gail Gardner
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    Ken W Wilson wrote:The native pecans we have in Missouri can stand wet soils much better than black walnut. They thrive on flood ground. All the pecan farms here are on flood ground.

    Grafting them or buying grafted trees is worth the expense.  Grafted trees produce nuts 5-10 years sooner and a named variety of northern pecan will have bigger nuts. We don’t like thin shelled southern pecans as well here. Our pecans have a higher oil content and more flavor.  People from farther south may disagree. Of course, if you’re too far south for northern varieties, then southern varieties will be better. I don’t know if they like wet soils or not. I think some varieties are from Texas and might like it dryer.



    Pecan trees in Texas tend to be in open fields (not in standing water).  In Oklahoma, they grow not far from running creeks and wet-weather creeks, but not as close to them as persimmon trees. I suspect they don't like to be in standing water, but don't mind being close enough to tap into it with their roots.
     
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    Great post Nicole! Early American persimmons do best on wet side of PNW.  If you are very coastal, might want some very early ones.

    I have grafted Winter banana apple on malus fusca a couple of times. It takes. Then you can graft any other apple onto winter banana.  

    Pecans generally need to much heat to do well in PNW.  Down south, it's hot all day and all night for half the year at least. Not so here. You can call Burnt Ridge Nursery. I think they recommend to E OR and E WA only.

    Many currants and gooseberries should do well in part shade.

    Berries in general.

    Many, many green leafies too.

    These are the healthiest things you can grow and eat.

    Expensive to buy, rot quickly.. Grow them at home!

    John S
    PDX OR
     
    pollinator
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    Pecans generally need to much heat to do well in PNW.  Down south, it's hot all day and all night for half the year at least. Not so here.  


    In Tacoma, WA opposite the St. Joseph Hospital the street is lined with pecan trees. The produce abundantly and the nuts mostly just spout in the gutter.  I brought some home to transplant but never got them to where they were supposed to be.
    So with climate change toward hotter dry er summers and if you are above the fog I think the Pecans are viable. I hope to try again.
     
    James Landreth
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    Hans Quistorff wrote:

    Pecans generally need to much heat to do well in PNW.  Down south, it's hot all day and all night for half the year at least. Not so here.  


    In Tacoma, WA opposite the St. Joseph Hospital the street is lined with pecan trees. The produce abundantly and the nuts mostly just spout in the gutter.  I brought some home to transplant but never got them to where they were supposed to be.
    So with climate change toward hotter dry er summers and if you are above the fog I think the Pecans are viable. I hope to try again.



    That's great news!

    I know people who have grown pecan trees to maturity here in western Washington, they just had problems of not getting enough heat to ripen them. I think it's worth planting a few because climate change will probably change this, but I'd definitely have most my planting be walnuts, which we know will ripen here
     
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    Wow!

    I am wondering when pine pollen is.




    Flower Lab

     
    John Suavecito
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    Good point Hans,
    If they were selected from nuts that grew in the PNW they will probably do better.

    I know with my fig tree, Desert King, it used to just get one harvest in the summer, but now we get a fall harvest too, every year.

    When I started really growing food about 25 years ago, they told me not to grow Concord grapes in PNW.  Now the other grapes are all done in Sept and early Oct, so having COncord is great to get another harvest for later Fall.
    John S
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    Simon Gooder,
    If you have the red alder sap in the freezer, you might have some luck with partial thawing to concentrate the sweetness. The sweet melts first. Think of popsicles. That could reduce the boiling needed to make syrup. Maybe.
     
    John Suavecito
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    James-
    Mayhaw is a hawhtorn. There are many good tasting hawthorns that will do well here.  Of course, there are many others that taste bad.

    My favorite is the carriere hawthorn, which I have grafted, as it is a common street tree.  

    I have another one that keeps better but doesn't taste as good. I don't know it's name but I also grafted it from a street tree.   I am still eating it from last fall.

    Remember, you don't have to buy hawthorn rootstock.  The birds offer it freely for you.

    John S
    PDX OR

     
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    Brazilian Cherry does well in shady, wet areas and is generally very hardy - not sure about its tolerance for cold though.
     
    James Landreth
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    Posts: 683
    Location: Western Washington
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    duck forest garden personal care rabbit bee homestead
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    John--
    If you have time would you mind potting up any hawthorn seedlings you find? I don't have any on my property. I want to use them as rootstock for the church projects I've mentioned. My Italian plum and feral cherry trees are making seedlings all over the place, and that's what I plan on doing with them
     
    John Suavecito
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    Posts: 2659
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    We don't have to pot them up James. I'll dig them up when you need them. I don't want to have to keep watering them until you get them.
    John
     
    Posts: 23
    Location: The Great PNW
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    Excellent Post!!! Great to have this written comprehensive list.
    My personal native PNW favs:
    salmonberry
    blackcap respberries
    thimbleberries
    huckleberries
    and native red elderberries (as i sip my [black] elderberry tea)

    M
     
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    Nice guide, will definitely help me out.
     
    Posts: 40
    Location: South-central Iowa
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    Here's what has worked for me in Iowa in dappled to full shade:

    Pawpaws
    Gooseberries
    Currants
    Honeyberries
    Black raspberries
    Elderberries
    Comfrey
    Burdock
    Nettles
    Caucasian Mt Spinach (CMS)
    Hosta
    Mushrooms
    Violets
    Mint
    Lemon balm
    Linden
    Mulberry
    Autumn olive
    Aronia
    Chives
    Garlic chives

    Cheers,
    Kirk
     
    Posts: 10
    Location: Southern Oregon
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    I'm in Southern Oregon on some dry (from May through October) wooded property with decomposed granite soil... Makes great paths but it takes a lot of compost to grow most things... I don't get much more than 3 hrs. of sun anywhere in the half acre I am gardening, but am amazed at how much food grows in spite of it.  I grow most of what has been mentioned already and can add a few things - apples, pears (asian), prunes and Shizandra vine (does very well).

    I have just added some perennial vegs I grew from seed: Caucasian Mountain spinach vines, Korean Celery, red-leaf Plantain, Good King Henry scullcap and perennial kale. Have narrow and broad leaf plantain volunteers that do well so I thought I would add the red leaf. I grew Sea Kale from seed a few years back - and just discovered it will grow from pieces of it's fat, brittle root - which is lovely because I found it very hard to start from seed (only managed the one). Now I have several starts going. It's a beautiful plant I think so it's nice as an edible ornamental. I grow LOTS of kale - many many kinds - they all do well here and are one of my main staples year round. I am working at developing plants well adapted to my place so save seed from especially nice plants each year.

    I also grow native coastal strawberry as a lawn and groundcover along with the wood strawberry and Seascape everbearing and Alpines - red and yellow. They all seem unphased by shade and bear fairly well. The same with raspberries and thornless blackberries. Blueberries on the other hand - simply won't bear. The plants do fine, but they rarely bloom and fruit. I don't know if it's a shade issue or what. I have them in about 6 different places and 7 or 8 different varieties. The only variety that bears anything is Southern Blue - a dwarf semi-evergreen.

    Tubers work well here - Jerusalem artichoke and yacon and oca don't seem to mind the shade (they don't bloom but make nice tubers and plants), I store the yacon in a tub over the winter - it will actually store for nearly a year with no extra fuss!. I'm also growing Apios american in a pot because I have mole and rat issues and want to get enough going before I take a chance of putting them in the ground. It is doing fine on my deer fence in a fair amount of shade.  Comfrey, fennel and many of the Mediterranean herbs also do fine.

    I have an Illinois Everbearing Mulberry - a truly delicious berry - growing crowded in amongst a grove of native hazelnuts with just it's top sticking out and it bears from it's lowest branches on up! It's fast and pretty and seems to need no coddling from me at all. I highly recommend it for being a very carefree and attractive food bearing tree.

    I grow asparagus in several beds, evergreen onions (Egyptian?), french sorrel, Angelica and Lovage. St. Johnswort and tall native evening primrose volunteered around the garden, along with tall mullien (I love the look of it and always leave a few!) and masses of Shooting Stars in early spring - which I understand are edible although I have yet to try them. I have a couple China blue vines which are very pretty and easy care. They have not yet bloomed or gotten fruit but since they are evergreen they are nice to grow where you see them in the winter. I can't say yet if they will fruit with so little sun.  I have Lingonberries and wintergreen, but they have yet to bear fruit either. But they grow and do well. Chicory, yarrow (native and cultivated), sweet woodruff, Solomons seal, and the native false Solomon's seal do well in my dry shade.

    Oh dear - this ended up being very long... I should have made a list I guess. I didn't realize there would be so many things, until I got to thinking about it all. Sorry.  I just love coming to this website and just losing myself for an hour or two in all the wonderful posts and discussions.  Thought it was time to jump in and join you all.
     
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    THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU.    I have just hit upon your post.  I have a wild garden on a north facing slope at about 8500 feet under aspen.
    there are wild geraniums and leaves of wild strawberries and what I think is valerian,  also dandelion and grasses oh and bedstraw.    I have weeded around  the strawberries a and rooted daughter plants from runners.  I water them.  One plant put out flowers that never bloomed.  ie, no strawberries.  Ideas?  Do you suppose they need more sun?   Other sites say need 10 yours of direct sun.   I forgot, service berries volunteer there too.  They have made some berries.  
     
    This. Exactly this. This is what my therapist has been talking about. And now with a tiny ad:
    Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
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