William Bronson

pollinator
+ Follow
since Nov 27, 2012
William likes ...
forest garden trees urban
Forum Moderator
William Bronson currently moderates these forums:
Montessori kid born and raised in Cincinnati.
Father of two, 14 years apart in age,married to an Appalachian Queen 7 years my junior,trained by an Australian cattle dog/pit rescue.
I am Unitarian who declines official membership, a pro lifer who believes in choice, a socialist, an LGBTQ ally, a Black man, and perhaps most of all an old school paper and pencil gamer.
I make, grow, and serve, not because I am gifted in these areas, rather it is because doing these things is a gift to myself.
Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
130
In last 30 days
17
Total given
106
Likes
Total received
1140
Received in last 30 days
82
Total given
2349
Given in last 30 days
100
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Pollinator Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by William Bronson

Ease of loading and unloading is a significant design feature.
I think being able to fill a perforated steel container with feedstock and roll it into the kiln is a good idea.
The cage of an IBC tote, lined with hardware cloth and rolling on steel casters is what I have in mind
A block building that could hold  an entire IBC tote, heated by exhausting a batch rocket directly into it, would be my vote for ease of construction.
If we make large enough to hold 3 or 4 IBC totes, we could alternately load a long cart full of log and lightly pyrolize them, to increase their durability.
Any load could be potentially be quenched with wood vinegar, which in different concentrations, can deter or encourage microbial life.
In my opinion,the heat produced is best used to distill water.
By nature of the process,distilling water produces a product and moves the heat to someplace else that is cooler.
This could be used for space heating, but it will at least move the heat.
3 hours ago

You have a design similar to the Hornitos biochar kiln.
It is essentially a rocket fired white oven.



It controls the flow of  the wood gas exhaust  by monitoring temperatures temperatures.
The point when they become flammable is precisely identified, and the gas is diverted .
Each kiln routes the woodgas to the kiln next to it, in a daisy chain that allows each act of pyrolosis to fuel the next.

Unfortunately the Hornitos biochar kiln video is caught up in a copyright fight, so I havent been able to view it online.




The Iwasaki kiln is another similar design.
The Iwasaki kiln routes the exhaust of a fire directly through a "bell" full of feed stock.
There is no separation between the exhaust gasses of the fire that drives the reaction,and the biochar feedstock.
It is essentially, a "black oven".
As with the Hornitos biochar kiln the exhaust temperature is monitored.
This time it is  diverted to  a simple  condensing apparatus to capture the wood vinegar.
As the temperatures rise, the vinegar element tampers off and the tars begin to be present.
They could also be captured by condensation, but they are toxic.
Aside from using them as preservative, they would be a refined fuel, stored energy.
Most of the set ups seem to burn them off without capturing the energy.

The man in the first video below has a working apparatus that is cranking out char and wood vinegar.
They guys in the second video below are trying use it to fuel the reaction, much like in your design.
They don't seem to be using a rocket stove, even though they reference  the Hornitos biochar kiln, which did use a rocket stove.
I think a batch box rocket could be sized to pyrolize everything in the associated kiln, with little wasted heat, but the wood gas from the retort would go to waste.

Iwasaki Kiln



Biochar kiln, modified Iwasaki kiln with pressure vessel and cracker piping.

Potentially, one could get wood vinegar , biochar, heat and pyrolysis oil from a single batch of feedstock.
I think the pyrolysis oil  might be worth doing, because it allows us to use wood to fuel whatever reaction we want whenever we want, rather than needing to use it right then and there.
It wont be getting into the atmosphere, so that's a bonus.
Is it dirty to burn later?
I think if we add it back into a rocket stove, it would burn clean.
Introducing it through the secondary air port might work, or some other drip or atomizing system could do the trick.

4 hours ago
Ah, I get it.
Well, Chia seed and flax seed are used as a substitute for eggs, including in mayo:homemade-mayonnaise-from-flax-seeds
1 day ago
There is Permie that shared their work on making a press:Cinva Ram CEB press

I love the idea of a Permie ship, every time a cargo ship/crew is left adrift at sea by a corporation, I have wished there was a way little people to band together and take possession of it.
A traveling seed bank/library/ machine shop/wood shop/power plant could get a lot done.
Equip it with designs from https://www.opensourceecology.org/

Maybe sailing vessels with one last trip left in them, or a vessel build to be dismantled and reused at the other end would be the way to go.
1 day ago
There is Permie that shared their work on making a press:Cinva Ram CEB press

I love the idea of a Permie ship, every time a cargo ship/crew is left adrift at sea by a corporation, I have wished there was a way little people to band together and take possession of it.
A traveling seed bank/library/ machine shop/wood shop/power plant could get a lot done.
Equip it with designs from https://www.opensourceecology.org/

Maybe sailing vessels with one last trip left in them, or a vessel build to be dismantled and reused at the other end would be the way to go.
1 day ago
Are you vegan?
Milk mayo is quite tasty, if you eat milk.
Of course, if you do dairy, sour cream is as creamy as you you might want.
1 day ago
Took down most of a tree with my hackzall.
Love that thing.

One note about your beam cutting Dale.
As you know,  good steel or even cast iron is hard to cut with sawblades of any type.
On these materials I use a side grinder with a diamond blade,  intended for ceramics and concrete,and it eats right through.
No way a sidegrinder can cut deep enough for your beam,  but a concrete saw should work, and Milwaukee has one with a 14" blade ,though its not cordless.
Dewalt has a cordless but it's only 9".
Anyway,  thought I might mention the idea in case you need a back up plan.
4 days ago
Free chickens are my favorite kind!
All my chooks arrived at my house already past 2 years of age, donated by people who had decided against slaughtering their own chickens after they had gotten the next generation.
Not enough room led to some really messed up chooks at the bottom of the pecking order.
I took them from a typical chicken yard to my backyard, free ranging.
They got fat regrew feathers, generally live the good life.
We l,ost three to ailments or predators, but the survivors all still lay, two years plus later.
If I where to buy them I would select Auracauna for the egg color, personality and hardiness.
They are the last too stop laying in the winter, and the first to start again , still in the winter, with no artificial light.
Now the Rhode Island reds were ok, but not as hardy, nor as personable in general.
Got some new ones, big and black and iridescent.
Beautiful, but the new Auracauna is beautiful too and more personable by far.

I think raising chickens to the point that they lay, and selling them along with the gear, is a great idea.
If you could advertise a no kill retirement home, for a fee, or even for a subscription fee(!) you could get even more people to try it!
As long as you have room, I've yet to find any of them to be much of a drain, even in winter they eat some feed, but spend most of their time foraging , and i just have a back yard.
Keep in mind few annuals can thrive where chickens roam freely, but I hate mowing anyway.


4 days ago
To build a water jacketed barrel without welding,  I would use the tank from an electric water heater,stripped of insulation and cut down to size, maybe 30" tall.
Standard barrels are 35" tall,  so open one on both ends,  and slip it over the tank.
At the bottom of the space between the outer barrel and inner tank, pour hydraulic cement a few inches deep.
Seal with regular silicon caulk, the temperatures involved will not exceed 212 degrees.
I would pump water in and out of this waterjacket over the lip of the barrel to avoid poking holes in it.

I think this will work,  it's a scaling up of a small one I built to cool the feed tube on a J rocket, that worked, but needed a way to circulate a large volume of water.
6 days ago
My daughter loves these videos!
I hope to do simple lashed sapling structures with her this summer, inspired by the projects we have seen.
Mind you, I will use wire or jute, Im not willing to make my own lashing, yet.
6 days ago