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snake boot HELP please

 
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Does anyone know of a snake boot made in the USA? Not snake skin boots, snake proof boots. I have searched high & low but there doesn't seem to be any made here. Barring that I'd settle for made in North America. Next choice would be from anywhere in the Western Hemisphere. Then from the rest of the world except that huge country that starts with a C. That's just how I shop. Buy local & support the local economy. Sometimes it is very difficult. This is one of those times. If my leatherworking tools were not 1000 miles away at the moment I just might order some kevlar or something & make some.

We have 6 types of poisonous snakes around here. Water moccasins (cottonmouth) mostly. Big ones. Also copperheads & 3 kinds of rattlesnakes. Plus coral snakes but they don't have much in the way of fangs. They are more of a risk to hands than any kind of shoe.
 
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If all else fails, maybe some heavy duty/ steel-toed hiking boots with leather or very heavy canvas gaiters? I've had snake strikes, and if the gaiters are puffy-ish, one of the ways, besides their own thickness, that they protect, is by not being close to the skin, so the target of the strike is essentially made at a distance from your skin. I'm not sure I'm making sense, in my wording...
 
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I'm just wondering if you really need specific boots. Most boots are not close to your skin, there seems to be always space between skin and rubber. Also we have snakes here but none of them are very aggressive, most just want to get away. Are you sure you need such protective gear?
 
Mike Barkley
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Yes, I'm sure. I spend a lot of time far from any help. Water moccasins are more territorial & more aggressive than many other snakes. I sometimes have to invade their homes but even outside their main habitat the odds of a chance encounter are high. For those reasons I always keep a good snakebite kit handy but I'd rather not need it.
 
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The first link says all of those boots are made in the USA but other sites say that some of them are not anymore. You might need to call the manufacturers directly to find out for sure.

https://www.usamadeproducts.biz/footwear-hunting-boots-snake.html

https://snakeboots.com/

https://www.workbootsusa.com/chippewa-snake-boots.html

 
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I often go bushwhacking here in Snake Central and we use snake gaiters on top of our normal leather low boots. I did a quick search for snake gaiters made in USA and got a few hits- one from a place called Republic Brand in Texas (although they seemed a bit more like chaps, kinda high), and another product called Turtle Skin, https://turtleskin.com/default/snake-gaiters.html They're spendy, but should last a lifetime.
 
Mike Barkley
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Most of the boots listed on those sites are imported. There are 2 that appear to be made locally though. Need to check them out further when I'm somewhere with cell phone coverage. They are also eye watering expensive. At least one is custom made, probably a long wait, but they sure are fine! Might settle for not made in the C country for now & make my own later.

Gaiters are an option but I'd rather not have an extra thing to keep track of. Plus, I've used them before & for some reason they distract me. I'll check those out though. Maybe they have improved in recent years.
 
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I always keep a good snakebite kit handy but I'd rather not need it.  



Just what does a current proper snakebite kit have in it? In my childhood, it was recommended for a rattler bite, to slice the wound and suck out the poison, spitting to the side. I think that method was tossed out somewhere along the way...
 
Tereza Okava
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Mike Barkley wrote:
Gaiters are an option but I'd rather not have an extra thing to keep track of. Plus, I've used them before & for some reason they distract me. I'll check those out though. Maybe they have improved in recent years.


I hear you! more to lose in the car....
the gaiters we use are actually made of plastic inside a sleeve (think a soccer shinguard), not Kevlar (or whatever those made-in-USA ones are), we have a lot fewer options. But I do like that I can use different boots (hiking, work, etc) with the gaiters, and if the treads wear out I can replace the boots but still use the gaiters.
 
Mike Barkley
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No snake bite kit is very effective. This is the best one I know of though & what I carry. Highly controversial but I think it's better than nothing if it might take many hours to reach a hospital.

https://sawyer.com/products/extractor-pump-kit/



 
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https://www.russellmoccasin.com/snake-boots/

Very expensive but you get what you pay for.
 
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I have a pair of Danner snake boots. They are lightweight, 360 protection and waterproof. I absolutely love them - they are made in the PNW
 
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I've lived in your part of the world and understand your concern. In FL I had those tiny rattlers all around the "left natural area" around my yard and sometimes in my grass, where I had built a new home.  Visiting regularly with folks in rural FL/GA I heard of stories about people walking through 2-3 foot "water deep" swamps and stepping into moccasin nests, getting dozens of bites--but only their relatives were available to tell me the stories.  40 years ago I was looking for snake pants, getting nowhere, and finally typed into the search line "snake Chappies" (that took me to a mining site) and bought what I was looking for (from an outfit in ID, WA, or TX) for walking through (exploring) high grass wilderness in Colorado's High Plains. I found them at a mining web site--because miners work in snaky-areas; and worse, often on steep slopes and on their knees, where if you move fast you fall, slip and roll down mountain sides (but the snakes manage fine).   I still have them and they are still in great shape (like brand new).  They are a tight weave material covered with layers of seal that have sort of a "knock on wood" type of coating (I think it is formaldehyde) but though they are stiff, they don't crack, and they do easily bend, but they are too hard for snake to bite through.  I'm guessing that I could not stab (with a sharp forward force) a sharp pointed knife through it, but the point itself might penetrate it, but not snake teeth.   I've worn them in FL, GA, AR, TX, NY, and WI in rugged and woodsy areas, and have learned that they are "plenty good" in snow states as well as warm, wet, dense states.  In snow states they are like gaiters that go up to the waist's crotch. In snow states I have plenty of times had near frostbite on my upper front leg-thighs walking through drifts; but not with snake chappies.  Now, "I spit on the snow and threaten to 'yellow it' " (if you get my drift on that subject)!  

Now, I don't walk trails; I recognize them as "built" to keep people away from things that would arouse their curiosity, from which they might learn something, even take samples and thereby "mess with the land" (I am referring to foraging, and an occasional rock collecting).   Even animals prefer trails that are direct, stable, covered and problem free (like people trails; and animals followed by Indians created many a trail; and later blacktop covered them up).
Now, my legs always sweat in them because there is no air flow; but the wetness is a warm and mild dampness--never dripping wet; and not like walking through a shallow pond or creek).   Mine are not insulated and I don't recommend that. The leg itself provides whatever heat may be needed.   I can walk dew covered underbrush anywhere east of "the real west" and keep my pant legs, ankles and boot tops dry (even though my blue-jean legs will be damp, but the wetness there is nowhere near as wet as getting even a mild soak).  I can/have walked through briar patches problem free (with a similar outlook as towards the snow drifts).  My recommendation is look for "chappies, snake chappies, snake chappy pants"--and check mining web sites (and clothing items for sale).    
Mine are "full legged" (not insulated) chappies. The bottom rests on my boots half-way from ankles to toes.  The top goes to my waist and has a belt loop.
They go up to my crotch, where it opens up with a gentle curve in front and rear, at zipper and buttox.   So where they are real "chappy" is in the mid-section; but the legs are like a pant.  It is so firm that when I walk, my inner thighs that "never rub against each other in blue jeans" do rub with chaps on, probably because I got XL (maybe equivalent to todays XXL) because I wanted to ensure that I had room to bend down and get on my knees.  I was about 5' 9" and 180lbs when I got them; now I'm 5', 8.5" (old age shrinks you) and 165lbs.  
Lastly, I live now in a state adjoining Canada, but travel 4x/yr to a hilly state adjoining TX.  I have my Bug Out Bag (BOB) packed all the time with basic essentials. My snake "chappy" pants are in my BOB.  I can wear them in snow, snow drifts, through rain, puddles, snake, bug (best with tape over ankles on chappies) or briar infested areas. I could literally sleep in a pile of leaves, if need be (for warmth) and my old legs will not feel frozen.  By the way, 25 years after my combat vet experience I woke up and became a Prepper; before that I just put my nose to whatever grindstone that was before me and plowed ahead kind of oblivious to past experiences.
One last thing I want to mention about wearing chappies (snake pants) and getting damp (not wet from sweat) blue jeans is that it is a physical science truism that HEAT ALWAYS CHASES COLD, AND HEAT ALWAYS CARRIES ALONG WITH IT MOISTURE.  Moisture never travels with cold; instead, moisture drops out of the travel game (as fog, rain or snow).  In summer, if your house is A/C'd, outside heat will penetrate every hole, crack in outside pipe putty, opening around windows and doors looking for a way to chase your cooler interior.  In Winter, the heat is inside your house and looking for a way out (and it will take humidity with it).  All of this is the way that houses BREATHE.  Ultimately no one is benefitted by having months old humidity hang around the interior of a house.  If you don't believe it, examine Building Science.Com.  So the same thing happens with pulling off chappies after they have dampened your blue jeans (if, if). The heat in your jeans will move out quickly into the cooler air and take dampness right along with it.  To the best of my recollection my damp blue jeans were dry 15 minutes after removing chappies outdoors.   I've never slept in them all night; but if I had to, I would want to know how long my legs might freeze with "chill" when I took off the chappies.    If it is wind-chill cold outside and you want to avoid that; wait till you get indoors or until the weather warms up (but I am not implying that I have ever, which I have not ever had, a problem with dampness in jeans inside full legged chappies.   I am fairly certain that my chappies are constructed of formaldehyde covered canvas material (presumably cotton).  They are rigid, defensive in personality, flexible, adaptive to squatting, kneeling, walking and resisting of anything Mother Nature wants to throw in front of it (including snakes of all sizes).   And, for guys at least, they are very hospitable when it is time to lean against a tree.

At age 70 and in charge of yard care and in a state adjoining Canada, I would rarely go out to deal with snow (or wind chill) without wearing chappies.  When you are old, you cool too easily (I cool now as much as my wife did 40 years ago)--protection becomes more important!  And if my neighbors want to laugh at me; my unsaid response is that I want to yellow their snow; or better yet, it is time for me to move back to God's World, the countryside (and I have lived rural, even on an E-coast mountain top all by myself, with my wife.  I would have thought, by now, approaching the 50th year that my wife would have found a better man than me, so that I could escape town and city life,--but Nope!  Life is all screwed up. You can't predict it; but you can prepare your BOB and you can somewhere (maybe a mining web site that sells clothes) find some full pant leg chappies.
 
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I would also recommend the gaiters over the chaps or boots. Every situation is different, so if you are walking around in the swamp then the boots could be a benefit. The chaps are heavy and hot, and I found the gaiters to be the lightest and most versatile of the three, mostly because you can don them quickly as needed.
 
Mike Barkley
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I frequently do walk around in swamps & swampy areas. Water moccasins are my main snake concern. Ended up going with a pair Danner boots. As I recall only one or two of their styles are made in USA & those were out of stock at the time. Mine were made elsewhere but not in that country I don't buy anything from. The boots are surprisingly comfortable & have held up well.
 
William Kellogg
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Those moccasins are aggressive! I think I would wear the boots too. I once had one nesting under the deck of my boat and he almost got me...
 
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Good choice on the Danners.  They do still have USA made boots that are comfortable and not too expensive considering snake bite treatment at a hospital runs north of six figures now days.  I have yet to be hit by a rattler on my place, so nothing to review there; but they are comfortable and well made.  Worth the high priceif it keeps me out of the ER.
 
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