• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • r ranson
  • Jay Angler
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Timothy Norton
  • Christopher Weeks
gardeners:
  • Saana Jalimauchi
  • Jeremy VanGelder
  • Ulla Bisgaard

uses for parsley seed

 
master steward
Posts: 11553
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6453
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We all have things that grow easily and well, and things that just don't.

In my ecosystem, parsley grows well and self-seeds so long as I periodically give it a new area to exploit.

Parsley and celery are in the same plant family. That got me thinking. Celery seed and parsley seed look quite similar, but celery is *much* harder to grow in my region.

Has anyone tried substituting parsley seed for celery seed in recipes?

I regularly used celery seed in pickle recipes for example.

Has anyone tried this? Can anyone think of a reason not to?
 
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 14030
Location: SW Missouri
9496
2
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jay Angler: That is an awesome idea! Certainly makes sense!

I did a search, and the net is not useful for this question. Only thing I saw that was interesting was one line that said Italian cuisine uses parsley seeds.

I think parsley seeds would be yummy to cook with! I have a batch that is starting to flower, I'll be saving the seeds anyway, I'll try some!  Wonder if I have any around from the last batch... hmm...
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11553
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6453
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:I think parsley seeds would be yummy to cook with! I have a batch that is starting to flower, I'll be saving the seeds anyway, I'll try some!  Wonder if I have any around from the last batch... hmm...  

We could start a new trend! I guess I'd better hunt up my older seeds, although I tend to just broadcast parsley seeds by cutting of a ripe seed head and shaking it in other spots on my homestead.
 
steward
Posts: 15146
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4151
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jay, I also, feel you have come up with a great idea.

I don't use a lot of seeds in cooking and probably should.

I know I have celery seeds and I use dill seeds when making pickles.

I can't remember though I feel celery seeds give a dish a celery flavor so parsley seeds would give the dish a parsley taste.

I ask Mr. Google who did not find anything about eating or cooking with parsley seeds.

I did find This article on the health benefits of using parsley:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/parsley-benefits#TOC_TITLE_HDR_3

Here are some articles on cooking with culinary seeds that some might find interesting:

https://www.ourmidland.com/lifestyles/article/Cooking-with-culinary-seeds-and-how-they-can-be-15734077.php

https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/seeds/

https://www.foodnetwork.com/healthyeats/healthy-tips/2013/04/10-everyday-uses-for-nuts-and-seeds
 
Rusticator
Posts: 8084
Location: Missouri Ozarks
4268
6
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It sounds very much like something John and I would both love to play with, too.
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11553
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6453
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've known for years that parsley leaves are a very nutrient-rich addition to anything I can add some to. It's one of the reasons I grow it around the property, particularly some right near the door so I can grab some if I'm making bone broth, soups, stews etc.

I also add the leaves when making pesto - I had some Stinging Nettle Pesto as part of lunch and I remember adding parsley leaves to it.

I dry my own as larger leaves and only crush them when I'm ready to use them to help preserve that nutrition. I can hide the dry version in another batch of dishes where people might not expect it.

The one thing I *don't* do, is use it as a "garnish" as most people won't eat it that way, so it seems a waste of good parsley.

However, I will try to do some hunting later to see if it's possible to get a nutritional breakdown of the seeds. That said, I don't need to compare that to the leaves, but rather compare that to celery seed or other herb seeds that I might use.  I know I've got a recipe somewhere that called for Coriander seeds,  which is really just another name for Cilantro and I think Cilantro is in the same family  as parsley if I'm not misremembering.

I do think it would be good to do some experimenting here, and I'm glad to have expert cooks like Carla and her husband on board!  Let's try this fellow permies!
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11553
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6453
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not much time for research tonight, but I did find one site that suggested medicinal uses for parsley seed.
https://www.alwosta.tn/en/blog/160_amazing-health-benefits-of-parsley-seeds.html

The article doesn't say anything about the quantity ingested to get the effect, which means I'm left guessing about how much could be used in cooking without getting a negative reaction. Certainly, that suggests as with any food, I need to start with relatively small quantities.

I was out watering some planters this morning and here's one of last year's parsley plants about to bloom. It's got a young tomato at its feet, along with a little romaine lettuce that might produce if we don't get too many heat waves in the next 3 weeks.
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 14030
Location: SW Missouri
9496
2
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I harvested my parsley seeds today, or rather, cut the stalks and put them to finish drying and dropping seeds. I was late getting them, lots are reseeding (which is fine) but I'll still get a lot. Will be experimenting soon!! I think I ended up with 20 or so bushy plants with multiple heads on each, so there's a lot. I stuffed them head down into a trash can to drop their seeds.  :D  
 
gardener
Posts: 2498
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
823
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've read that what are sold as celery seeds are often actually lovage seeds. I grew lovage last year and this. It's similar to parsley and celery but a large perennial. It makes big seed heads.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1455
Location: BC Interior, Zone 6-7
509
forest garden tiny house books
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I often use parsley seeds in place of or in addition to celery seed. I find dried parsley has so little flavour it's not worth bothering with. If I want parsley flavour in something when there's no fresh parsley, I'll use seed.

I also use in it place of caraway, which I believe is a punishment upon the earth 🤮
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 14030
Location: SW Missouri
9496
2
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jan White wrote:I often use parsley seeds in place of or in addition to celery seed. I find dried parsley has so little flavour it's not worth bothering with. If I want parsley flavour in something when there's no fresh parsley, I'll use seed.


Oh good! That's what I'm hoping for, I think dried parsley is lame too.


I also use in it place of caraway, which I believe is a punishment upon the earth 🤮


Hahaaha... I love caraway!
I want more things like it, one of my favorite default spice combinations is caraway, cumin seed, and cayenne pepper. I have things in the freezer labeled with their base ingredients, then CCC which means that mix.

Beware of my cooking if you don't want caraway!

Thank you for good points about parsley seed, I'm really curious!
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11553
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6453
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:That's what I'm hoping for, I think dried parsley is lame too.

Home dried or commercial? It certainly is milder dried, but when I home dry it, I don't crush it until I'm ready to use it, and I keep it in a glass jar in the fridge. I think that helps a bit. I suspect the seeds will be more shelf-stable.

Jan White wrote:  when there's no fresh parsley, I'll use seed.

crushed, ground or whole?

Pearl Sutton wrote:... I love caraway!
I want more things like it, one of my favorite default spice combinations is caraway, cumin seed, and cayenne pepper.

Yuck! I don't like either caraway or cumin. I do like cayenne! I particularly dislike caraway in bread! Yuck, yuck, yuck - waste of good bread! That said, I'm also in the cilantro tastes like soap camp, so maybe all those flavors have something in common, other than heavy use in Indian food?
 
If you like strawberry rhubarb pie, try blueberry rhubarb (bluebarb) pie. And try this tiny ad:
We need your help - Permies server fundraiser
https://permies.com/wiki/260600/Permies-server-fundraiser
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic