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Drawing Is the Best Way to Learn

 
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I loved the view taken by this author, db dowd in this article about Stick figures: Drawing as a Human Practice

It caused me to get my sketch book back out

Drawing shouldn’t be about performance, but about process. It is a way of taking in the world.



Drawing Is the Best Way to Learn, link to the full article

“We have misfiled the significance of drawing because we see it as a professional skill instead of a personal capacity,” he writes. “This essential confusion has stunted our understanding of drawing and kept it from being seen as a tool for learning above all else.”



... drawing is useful for our daily affairs from giving directions, taking meeting notes, outlining an presentation, or making grocery lists. It fosters close observation, analytical thinking, patience, even humility.  



Digital technology coddles us by giving us shortcuts to “instant knowledge,” but drawing breaks our collective instinct to Google everything, argues Dowd. He cautions against relying too much on easy paths to learning...



Drawing shouldn’t be about performance, but about process. Think of it as a way of observing the world and learning, something that can be done anytime, like taking notes, jotting down a thought, or sending a text.  



I wanted to put this in 'education' but nothing there seemed to fit...and 'art' is sort of the antithesis of what he is saying?
 
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Whilst I agree that drawing enables better assimilation of detail/what is observed, nevertheless it can require learning about perspective and proportion.  This has never appealed to me since I find it tedious although I do like exploring light and shade with something simple e.g. a pine cone.

I find watercolours more liberating e.g. giving more free rein into playful explorations - not needing to be so tied to realistic capture.  Here's one of mine...

willow-at-sunset.jpg
Water colors
Water colors
 
Judith Browning
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Lovely watercolor Amy

Whilst I agree that drawing enables better assimilation of detail/what is observed, nevertheless it can require learning about perspective and proportion.  



I think his intent is to encourage drawing, doodling, etc without concern about results...as he says it's "about process. It is a way of taking in the world."

I don't think he was talking about working towards any type of perfection of drawing skill...just encouraging us to draw rather than not draw because we are worried about it being or not being 'art'

 
Amy Francis
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Judith Browning wrote:Lovely watercolor Amy

Whilst I agree that drawing enables better assimilation of detail/what is observed, nevertheless it can require learning about perspective and proportion.  



I think his intent is to encourage drawing, doodling, etc without concern about results...as he says it's "about process. It is a way of taking in the world."

I don't think he was talking about working towards any type of perfection of drawing skill...just encouraging us to draw rather than not draw because we are worried about it being or not being 'art'



Ah I see/understand better now!  It's about overcoming the mental/judgemental stumbling block then (which, indeed, can be crippling)...kinda 'just do it!'

I do find drawing nature better enables you to take in wondrous, finer detail that the casual eye so easily overlooks.  It both further consolidates and bolsters my love of Nature.
 
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Judith Browning wrote:

I wanted to put this in 'education' but nothing there seemed to fit...and 'art' is sort of the antithesis of what he is saying?



I think it belongs in a few forums, and have taken the liberty of spreading the love.
 
pioneer
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Thank you for this topic, Judith.  So timely.

Seems as if I've been struggling forever to learn drawing.  Usually I shape things well enough by hand like clays, paper mache, foods, fabrics, whittling, etcetera, for practical purposes.  However my fingers seem to lose all creativity with writing / painting instruments.  

I've also been torturing myself - and others :=) - with restrictive drawing apps.  And now with a flood of ideas there seems to be no choice but to put pencil to paper and tough it out until something close enough shapes up  :-)  Though I'll have some modeling materials soon, there needs to be at least a rough draft to go by.

Okey dokey.  Here goes just doin' it! ^.^
 
Judith Browning
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Catherine Windrose wrote:Thank you for this topic, Judith.  So timely.

Seems as if I've been struggling forever to learn drawing.  Usually I shape things well enough by hand like clays, paper mache, foods, fabrics, whittling, etcetera, for practical purposes.  However my fingers seem to lose all creativity with writing / painting instruments.  

I've also been torturing myself - and others :=) - with restrictive drawing apps.  And now with a flood of ideas there seems to be no choice but to put pencil to paper and tough it out until something close enough shapes up    Though I'll have some modeling materials soon, there needs to be at least a rough draft to go by.

Okey dokey.  Here goes just doin' it! ^.^



Wonderful!
This article along with this quote  

“A simple line painted with the brush can lead to freedom and happiness.” Joan Miro.

recently did it for me.  
There's really nothing standing in my way except my own thoughts.
I used to 'just draw'...not sure why I stopped although some had to do with not being satisfied with the outcome and worrying about the judgement of others.  
Like you, my medium was not a pencil. Fiber, weaving in particular, was where I excelled.

I think it IS one of those 'just do it' things ...and don't be concerned about the outcome so much as enjoy the process

 
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I totally agree! For me drawing is the only way I can make things really clear. Both to make it clear to myself as to explain to others. That's why I have been drawing since my childhood.
Because I am drawing that long (and that often) I became skilled in it. Sometimes I thought of becoming an artist.
Now I understand 'making art' is not my aim (nor is 'selling works of art'). I draw (or 'sketch' or paint watercolours) to depict, to illustrate, to clarify. When that's the reason for drawing it isn't important to be a 'skilled artist'. Everyone can draw!
 
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