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What are Some Medicinal Teas that Could be Grown in a Forest Garden?

 
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What are Some Medicinal Teas that Could be Grown in a Forest Garden?

Here are some of my favorite teas:

Lavender is one of my favorite teas, especially since it grows in my garden. Lavender tea has a floral taste that is amazing.

The flower and the oil of lavender are used to make medicine. Lavender is commonly used for anxiety, stress, and insomnia. It is also used for depression, dementia, pain after surgery, and many other conditions



https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-838/lavender






Lemon Verbena.

Lemon verbena has been used as a medicinal plant for centuries to stop muscle spasms, as a fever reducer and sedative, for indigestion, and to increase appetite, among other indications. Research regarding its medicinal use is limited. The leaves and flowering tops are used in teas and as beverage flavors.



https://www.drugs.com/npc/lemon-verbena.html




Lemon Balm

lemon balm is used in traditional medicine as both a sleep aid and digestive tonic. It can be consumed as a tea, taken as a supplement or extract, or applied to the skin in balms and lotion. Lemon balm essential oil is also popular in aromatherapy, where it is believed to promote calmness and ease stress



https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-health-benefits-of-lemon-balm-89388




Chamomile

As a traditional medicine, it is used to treat wounds, ulcers, eczema, gout, skin irritations, bruises, burns, canker sores, neuralgia, sciatica, rheumatic pain, hemorrhoids, mastitis and other ailments



https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2995283/



What teas do you grow?  What are your favorite teas to drink?
 
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One of the things that I have found when asked about designing herb gardens is that lack of use can lead to plants becoming very straggly and overwhelmed by other more vigorous neighbours. So I am always keen in talks and articles to emphasise the planning of designs that will be harvested either repeatedly or at least seasonally. Growing for herb teas is an ideal way to ensure that plants are being harvested. So I have designed a handout list of around 30 suggestions for herb teas that can be grown in a UK temperate climate. Please feel free to pass on but I would appreciate credit to Holt Wood Herbs. Bear in mind that most of these herb teas do need light so, as we have done at Holt Wood herbs, lots of edges are needed in designs! Enjoy!
Filename: Medicinal-Herb-Teas-for-the-Garden.pdf
Description: Medicinal Herb Teas for the Garden
File size: 102 Kbytes
 
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I see Chaga fungus growing wild on the aspens around here. I'm not sure if I could inoculate for it, or just be happy if it shows up on its own. Tastes like woody dirt, but I've heard many claims of health benefits.
CBC animation: The origin of Chaga
 
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How about making teas from tea leaves?

Pine, cedar (arborvitae), beech, fig...

I have read that sweet chestnut and walnut leaves have medicinal properties but am not certain if these are taken as teas or ?
 
Anne Miller
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Anne Stobart wrote:One of the things that I have found when asked about designing herb gardens is that lack of use can lead to plants becoming very straggly and overwhelmed by other more vigorous neighbours.



This is one of the things that I did not understand about rosemary.

I saw people using it it a their kitchen and did not realise when I bought it that it can grow into a bush that is 4 ft tall and 4 ft wide!

Even with me using it for many different things from cooking, mouth wash, etc!
 
Andrea Locke
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Andrea Locke wrote:How about making teas from tea leaves?

Pine, cedar (arborvitae), beech, fig...

I have read that sweet chestnut and walnut leaves have medicinal properties but am not certain if these are taken as teas or ?



Sorry, I meant TREE leaves!
 
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This makes me think of the things that are already growing in the forests in my area (Missouri) like Nettles which makes an incredibly nourishing bright green herbal tea... Spring things like chickweed and cleaners... Summer things like wild bergamot... Solomons seal is abundant in our woods, but used more topically rather than as a tea. Motherwort I have found growing wild in the woods too. Comfrey is a good one for planting in your grown food forest, it covers alot of ground and is a nitrogen fixer and good useful medicinal!
Gosh theres more but I can't think of them right now! Loving this thread, thanks!
 
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I’ve been looking for medicine for my chickens and rabbits...and I should include myself. Is there a big difference in the use of plants across these three animals?  Could something be good for me, but not my chickens?  This is what I need to learn, and maybe even make some charts for my family. 😊
 
Kimberley Rowan
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Oops—I apologize—I posted this in the wrong thread...I’ll see if I can move it. ☹️
 
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Don't forget the mints! I love peppermint, spearmint... I also grow lemon balm and lemony catnip. I also love nettle tea, but haven't grown it myself. And I'm currently drinking tea with dandelion root, although this is from the store.
 
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Passiflora incarnata would probably do well! The leaves and vines can be used for tea that helps with calming and sleep. The flowers can also be used, but contain less of the medicinal compounds.
Make sure you only use incarnata for this; other varieties of passionflower have cyanogenic glycosides which when broken down will quickly release poisonous cyanide.
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