• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

Hazelnut fantasy

 
Posts: 19
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I had a little fantasy going for a while, about quietly hiking into a large forested site that was owned by the local school district, used for forestry education, and open to the public... I would hike up to the top and plant a bunch of hazelnuts... shrubs that would do well in the Pacific Northwest woods. But between a) lack of funds and b) the only info I could find on hazelnuts said that I needed an assortment of varieties for crosspolilnation, I let the idea slide into oblivion.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1047
Location: Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
283
hugelkultur forest garden trees chicken wofati earthworks building solar rocket stoves woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Growing up in Bellingham WA we had a single hazel tree in our yard. It seemed to produce nuts just fine with no other hazelnut tree anywhere I found near by. It grew quite well in B'ham's climate.

As for going Johnny Hazel tree on the NW, not sure how good an idea that would be. While I love the trees and the nuts, humans have really mucked ecosystems up by introducing non native species into the wild. It is one thing to do it on your own land where you manage the forest to some degree. But releasing them into the wild I would question what the unforeseen impact(s) might be.
 
master steward
Posts: 14667
Location: Pacific Northwest
6632
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wonder how many hazelnuts you'd actually get out of the trees. My mom has at least three hazelnut trees on her property and has for many years. Growing up, I didn't even know we had hazelnut trees, because the squirrels ate them all before they were even ripe. Is there an easy, low-maintanience way to keep squirrels from eating all the nuts?
 
steward
Posts: 5441
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2073
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nicole Alderman wrote:Is there an easy, low-maintenance way to keep squirrels from eating all the nuts?



Give the squirrels a place to store the nuts that they collect for you.

 
pollinator
Posts: 182
Location: Washington Timber Country
42
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hazels are native and even pretty common here in the Washington woods. A lot of times I think people don't notice them because the nuts do get carried off so quickly by wildlife, though.

I see no problem with this plan. If you start the trees from seed, I think you'll have enough variety for cross pollination. Maybe as a low maintenance harvest plan, you can put handy nut-stashing spots nearby, like Joseph Lofthouse illustrated in this thread: https://permies.com/t/45993/trees/Nut-Trees-Squirrels

Edited to add: Joseph is on the scene!
 
Posts: 120
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joseph Lofthouse wrote:

Nicole Alderman wrote:Is there an easy, low-maintenance way to keep squirrels from eating all the nuts?



Give the squirrels a place to store the nuts that they collect for you.




Now you have my giggling to memories of the old Chip n Dale episodes where Donald decides to harvest nuts for this walnutbutter business by using a brace and bit and a bucket!




Squirrels aren't a problem here, but would a small terrier with a kennel house in amidst the trees keep squirrels away?
 
Devin Lavign
pollinator
Posts: 1047
Location: Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
283
hugelkultur forest garden trees chicken wofati earthworks building solar rocket stoves woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Roberta Wilkinson wrote:Hazels are native and even pretty common here in the Washington woods. A lot of times I think people don't notice them because the nuts do get carried off so quickly by wildlife, though.



I had not known of the native NW species, thanks for correcting my mistaken info.

*edit to add,

here is some info on the native hazel trees http://oregonstate.edu/trees/broadleaf_genera/filbert_hazel.html
 
Posts: 134
Location: Zone 4b at 1000m, post glacial soil...British Columbia
9
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm late to this discussion, but here are some things to think about when considering planting hazelnuts in the PNW.
http://thetyee.ca/News/2015/05/25/BC-Hazelnut-Growers-Shoulder-Blight-Fight/
http://www.naturetechnursery.com/eastern-filbert-blight/
 
Devin Lavign
pollinator
Posts: 1047
Location: Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
283
hugelkultur forest garden trees chicken wofati earthworks building solar rocket stoves woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
No worries Regan, I am late replying.

Good call on alerting us on that issue. I am definitely planning to do some planting of hazelnuts on my property so good to know I need to watch out for this and possibly opt for resistant trees. I will do plenty of research before I start planting trees on my property.
 
pollinator
Posts: 226
Location: Kachemak Bay, Alaska (usda zone 6, ahs heat zone 1, lat 59 N, coastal, koppen Dfc)
26
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
check out badgersett research farm, they sell reasonably priced hybrid hazel seedlings (around $6 each, $75 minimum order).http://www.badgersett.com/
also due to their growing method you can plant all summer long. they are continuing hybridizing work started in the 1930s. their hazels come from many generations of crossing corylus americana, cornuta, and avellana and are supposedly guaranteed not to succumb to eastern filbert blight. I just purchased 12 plants from them to try them out here in alaska (corylus avellana is native to areas even north of me on the coast of norway).
 
Corey Schmidt
pollinator
Posts: 226
Location: Kachemak Bay, Alaska (usda zone 6, ahs heat zone 1, lat 59 N, coastal, koppen Dfc)
26
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Devin Lavign wrote:

Roberta Wilkinson wrote:Hazels are native and even pretty common here in the Washington woods. A lot of times I think people don't notice them because the nuts do get carried off so quickly by wildlife, though.



I had not known of the native NW species, thanks for correcting my mistaken info.

*edit to add,

here is some info on the native hazel trees http://oregonstate.edu/trees/broadleaf_genera/filbert_hazel.html



they are related to birch and alders and at least here the young plants could be mistaken for alders
 
Devin Lavign
pollinator
Posts: 1047
Location: Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
283
hugelkultur forest garden trees chicken wofati earthworks building solar rocket stoves woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Corey Schmidt wrote:check out badgersett research farm, they sell reasonably priced hybrid hazel seedlings (around $6 each, $75 minimum order).http://www.badgersett.com/
also due to their growing method you can plant all summer long. they are continuing hybridizing work started in the 1930s. their hazels come from many generations of crossing corylus americana, cornuta, and avellana and are supposedly guaranteed not to succumb to eastern filbert blight. I just purchased 12 plants from them to try them out here in alaska (corylus avellana is native to areas even north of me on the coast of norway).



Thanks for the info, I will check them out.
 
Live ordinary life in an extraordinary way. Details embedded in this tiny ad:
Permaculture Community Garden fundraising effort - You can Win Stuff!!!
https://permies.com/t/152211/Permaculture-Community-Garden-fundraising-effort
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic