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Excited about fruit for 2022

 
pollinator
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Last year's perennials included blueberries, Apple, pear, Asian pear, and peaches.  This year we're adding cherries, another apple, 3 more blueberries, goji berries, elderberries (2), and raspberries. Our hope is that in a few years we'll have a couple of blueberry hedges, an orchard, and a smattering of both beautiful and fruitful plants everywhere around the property.

Does anyone have recommendations for other perennial fruit plants? We are also looking into currants, recently found out cranberries likely won't grow in Maryland.

Happy growing to everyone :)
 
pollinator
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Not sure of what area of Maryland you're in, but you may want to check and make sure currants aren't prohibited.  Here I believe black currants are banned statewide and all currants are banned in certain counties due to white pine blister rust.  I am not permitted to grow them (or gooseberries) in my county, but it's okay in the county where my parents live.  So my currants and gooseberries are 30 miles away and unfortunately I don't get to reap much of the harves.t
 
Brian Holmes
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Michelle Heath wrote:Not sure of what area of Maryland you're in, but you may want to check and make sure currants aren't prohibited.  Here I believe black currants are banned statewide and all currants are banned in certain counties due to white pine blister rust.  I am not permitted to grow them (or gooseberries) in my county, but it's okay in the county where my parents live.  So my currants and gooseberries are 30 miles away and unfortunately I don't get to reap much of the harves.t



My wife found the same thing online! Last we checked the ban had been widely lifted as it wasn't found to be effective in preventing spread. Will check again just in case
 
steward
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Sounds like some great fruit you've got Brian!

I've really enjoyed blackberries recently. They started producing a crop the year after planting, and I love their taste.

Best of luck, would love to see some pictures if you have them.

Steve
 
pollinator
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I would try quince, persimmon, goumis, mulberries.

Don't stop until you have grown all the fruit that will grow where you live.
 
pollinator
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Grapes, plums, juneberries, strawberries, and rhubarb
 
gardener
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Guomi berries are a treat! I also love gooseberries. Alpine strawberries are beyond delicious and a great ground cover.
 
pollinator
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Figs - wonderful figs!
 
Brian Holmes
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Hoping to get figs off my tree this year! This is it's first year coming back off the root ball, hoping for the best
 
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