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Abe Coley

pollinator
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since Nov 13, 2010
Missoula, MT
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Recent posts by Abe Coley

I take oxymoron to mean a contradiction in terms. Permaculture is the best way to farm, so it can't be an oxymoron.  Permaculture oil refinery - now that's an oxymoron.
2 weeks ago

Dillon Nichols wrote:If moss is happy in your environment, I would focus my efforts there.



If moss is not happy in your environment, creeping junipers are a drought-tolerant substitute. Often used for cascading rock gardens. Usually you can find tons of them in the discount section at your local nursery. Mix and match yellow, blue, and green varieties so the haters can scoff at your sassy scandalousness. https://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/1677/blue-rug-juniper/  https://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/1702/blue-star-juniper/
1 month ago
cob
I have germinated various elaeagnus seeds after a dry, cold stratification (kept in a plastic bag in a tin in my unheated garage over the winter). Super underwhelming germination, with only a few in the spring, most germed later in the summer and barely made it past cotyledon stage this year. This winter I am trying a moist cold stratification of some elaeagnus umbellata, and I am hoping for a much better germ rate.
1 month ago
this lady is very inspiring:
1 month ago

Travis Johnson wrote:Road construction projects are great places for free rocks.



Also building construction when the foundations are being dug. Basically any time you see an excavator at work, wait for them to stop or take a break, and ask. Just don't try to ask them while they are running the excavator, yelling and waving your arms or whatever, they hate that.
1 month ago
Last Friday I made about a cubic yard of pine/spruce/fir char in three hours just burning it up on flat ground. Only rule to remember is "when any part of the coals start to turn white, cover it with another piece of wood." Spray it out real good when you're done, rake it back and forth to make sure there aren't any parts still burning. When the pile stops steaming drive back and forth over it with a truck until it's finely crushed.

This method works good and you can avoid the embarrassment of having to explain that that hulking rusted out metal wreckage making your yard look all Mad Max is "actually a charcoal kiln"
2 months ago
Stripped one down to the studs and the roof cap and completely rebuilt it with hella insulation and air sealing. Horrible to work on, but totally sweet now that it's all done. Whether or not it's a good idea totally depends on the quality of the trailer.
3 months ago
That is weird.

I use the 15 mil ones from dripworks and I've never had that happen. I previously used their thinner tape, however I never had any of the thinner ones just blow out the side like that. I've even ran them over 30psi and not had them explode.

Can you take an up-close pic of the split when the water is off? A good pic of the hole and I might be able to tell what's happening.
3 months ago