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Extremely stony soil

 
Posts: 62
Location: Quarryville, PA
1
cat chicken homestead
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We're looking at buying a property that, according to the Webs Soil Survey site, is mostly Hazleton and Gilpin soils and Buchanan loam, both marked as "extremely stony".

Is this a non-starter? How long might it take us to build decent growing land by using livestock, lasagne beds and mountains of compost? Or is it a waste of time? I know that stones have a habit of "growing", coming up to the surface constantly.

Has anyone else here dealt with this? I'd rather not buy a long-term headache. That said, the property is just about perfect in every other respect. So, sigh....
 
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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Have you looked at the property?  Did it look extremely stony?

I live where it is extremely rocky. I don't know if there is a difference between stony and rocky.  I have rocks as big as boulders.

People run cattle and have goats here. No one grows and cuts hay except in the river valleys.

I would recommend looking at the land again if you looked at it.  Take something to be able to see how far down the rocks are and where they are.

I am not familiar with those soils nor have any idea whether this is gravel or big stones they are talking about.

Talk to people in the area about the soil.  Look at what people are doing with their land.  Are they growing hay and other crops?

Just some suggestions.

 
Colin McGee
Posts: 62
Location: Quarryville, PA
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Thanks. We haven't yet looked at it as it's about 5 hours drive from where we are now.
I'm doing the research to see if it's worth the drive, hence the question.
 
Posts: 74
Location: Central Texas
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I have a property that is very rocky. It’s kind of a bummer trying to get things going due to it but I got it cheap for the area and had other good potential.

What is the size of the property and the other perfect aspects?  I think those two things would be pretty big in deciding if it’s worth the hassle of rock
 
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