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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum. Completing this BB is part of getting the iron badge in Gardening.

This BB is all about saving seeds to create landraces.
Lofthouse Landrace Mospermia
Lofthouse Mospermia

To complete this BB, the minimum requirements are:
 - perform landrace seed saving for at least 12 species for at least 3 generations
 - save the seeds for particular traits, encourage those traits for 3 generations
 - start with at least 12 different sources of seed for each species

Here's some helpful information:
- https://permies.com/t/31939/Landrace-Gardening
- https://permies.com/t/70447/Landrace-Squash-photos-discussion

Also, remember that to meet the requirements of the iron badge for gardening all systems are polyculture systems, and all of this is completed without imports (except seeds) from more than 500 feet away.

To document your completion of the BB, provide proof of the following as pics or video (less than two minutes):
- the 12 species you're landracing
- the multiple sources of seed for each species you start with and any additions over time as you develop your landrace
- the traits you're encouraging for each of the 12 species
- 3 generations for each of the 12 species
COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
Posts: 637
Location: Montana
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I used to stare longingly at the photo and article on Painted Mountain Corn in the Garden City Seeds catalogue in Missoula when I was a teenager. Nobody called it a Modern Landrace back then cause Joseph hadn't invented it yet. Though thats what Dave's fantastic corn of many colors was and is. Finally I got a packet. Still growing its descendents. Painted Mountain Corn is many colored and was started from many flour corn varieties I started selecting it for only blue kernels at least by 1998 or 1999 maybe earlier. I grew it out every so often. Sometimes with up to five years of working out of state without a garden in between growouts. Also got it mixed with a flour corn called black mandan from a guy at the old Missoula farmers market by the railroad tracks. Selecting slowly towards bluer kernels. Though the dark red of the Black Mandan seems to alternate ears with the blue ears. Then in 2017 I was able to buy Papa's Blue from a breeder in Bozeman who worked much faster than me at the same project! Though I totally mixed it with mine.

Second picture below is a tub of landrace squash I harvested last fall. Food security. The Moschata is a mix of Lofthouse and a Thai squash. The seeds inside were probably pollinated by other Thai cross, Lofthouse, Autumn's choice, or possibly a landrace from Native Seed Search. I should cut it open and extract the seeds as I want to select from butternut shaped fruits- more efficient. The flesh is a little stringy compared to Lofthouse. My goal is to reclaim the fabulous Lofthouse flavor, flesh color, and texture but with stripes and the two colored fruit of Autumn's choice in some individuals.

The maximas are about year three of a mix with parentage from Lofthouse small medium and large, Arikara, Hidatsa, bitterroot buttercup, lower salmon river, Lofthouse buttercup, uncle Davids Dakota Dessert, and Rio Lucio. Also a couple maximas from farmers markets- not all seed comes in packets. I thought Rio Lucio was good. I grew it on and off from 2000 to 2016 fairly reconizably. I think their are still the ocassional recognizable Rio Lucio in my grex. It got a little contaminated by giant pumpkins, Lakota, and maybe Bitterroot  buttercup before I started mixing in stuff like crazy in 2016 with the Hidatsa and 2017 with Lofthouse and 2018 with Arikara and Bitterroot Buttercup and Lower Salmon River. Hmm, Lofthouse is best! All those years of effort to make a inferior squash. I bet with three more years of effort I could weed out the squash with stringy flesh and lower amounts of carotene and get it back where it was. Good thing Joseph just sent me fresh packets! I think I'll grow em out for seed and share em!
20200503_214833.jpg
Blue Painted Mountain Corn
Blue Painted Mountain Corn
20200503_215533.jpg
Maxima and Moschata
Maxima and Moschata
 
William Schlegel
pollinator
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Location: Montana
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When forming a landrace, the origin of the starting seed packets may matter a great deal. A seed packet from very far away might not be very useful.

So if you bought 12 seed packets of a species it is possible that when seed saving only the local packets would survive to save seed from.

In net that is a waste, especially if you have to buy all twelve.

A better thought in my opinion is to find a seed source that grows local seed locally (typically you will be able to grow this seed to seed yourself). Then add diversity from there, particularly by seed trading.

Having seed to trade and then trading it for more diversity is an integral part of the process. Trying to muscle through the process by simply purchasing all your starting seed- is wasteful and will net you far less diversity then will seed trading with like minded landrace style seed growers.

If you have never grown your own seed before, a good place to start would be to buy that local seed, perhaps two varieties that sound good from each species. Growing those together closely in the hopes that they will cross. Saving the seed, and then trading some of that seed for more varieties.

Look for seed companies in your area, if none, broaden out to nearby areas, get a few packets from the nearest source, grow it seed to seed, and then offer some of your increase in trade.

If you are a experienced seed saver, start with the varieties you currently seed save and just trade for more diversity.
 
master steward
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Thanks William!  I adjusted the requirements a bit regarding the starting seed source so it's not 12 seed packets.  I was thinking you wanted wide variety to begin with and if you don't know a landrace gardener nearby, it was a good way to go.  Now I think we're covered either way
 
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