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Using plastic covers to grow seedlings

 
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I used the plastic lids I recycled on my small table in a small space. I put the seeds in and they sprouted. Then I transplanted the seedlings into my flower pots for cultivation. I found that recycling some lids can be used to cultivate the seedlings. Has anyone tried the new method?
 
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Yes, I do this also! I use plastic “take out” food containers to make a mini greenhouse for starting seeds. Keep it closed to keep things warm and humid at first, then put the lids slightly askew to vent once the seedlings are up.
 
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I have been trying a new method with good success...

I take a glass lid for my cooking pots and I put it over a group of seeds I just planted.      The seeds in the highly humid area sprout quickly.    I then pull the lid off, and start more seeds in a different section with the lid, then transplant the seedlings.

I have found tht plastic coverings needs some air exchange so a hole or two in the top of the plastic container may be of bennefit.

Much can been learned from those who do a method called "winter sowing"    as they start many seeds in plastic containers.

https://rumble.com/v1q2ry7-does-winter-sowing-vegetables-work-the-final-winter-sowing-update.html
 
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Mart Hale wrote: I take a glass lid for my cooking pots and I put it over a group of seeds I just planted.



Why haven't I thought of that! That makes so much sense! Doh!

I have been trying to reduce the amount of plastic that I utilize in my gardening and one of the things that have been such a bother is either the flimsy tray covers or having to use disposable sandwich baggies to get seeds to sprout. Just use glass!

Funny enough, I have some battered window panes that are popping out glass that needs replacement. I think if I do a quick and dirty frame job around the individual panes so I can set them over some seeds I might be in business...
 
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Often the pickle and jam storage starts to empty when it is time fos seedlings. So I just upend some glass mason jars. Actually, I used them on sprong chilly nights in the garden as well. Otherwise they would just be standin thete waiting for harvest time.
 
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