• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

Forest garden plants for floodplain

 
Posts: 13
Location: NC Piedmont and SW Virginia
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Our house in the NC Piedmont is on a urban creek that floods about once/year, usually in hurricane season. Our "back 40" is wooded and we mostly ignore it, but I would love to turn it into a miniature forest garden. It is mostly made up of smallish hardwoods and alot of the undergrowth is an invasive type of honeysuckle shrub. The soil is like a sand box. We do have some interesting spring ephemerals - spring beauties, mayapple, trout lily. Otherwise it's pretty boring, would appreciate suggestions of any useful type of plant especially food, medicinal, and pollinator plants.
 
Posts: 40
Location: Ozark County, Missouri
9
forest garden foraging homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
things that come to mind that would do well in a once a year flooding understory are things that don't mind having their feet wet. do you have a patch of wild ramps? if so, you could tend and expand it. other things in the allium family (wild onions, chives, leeks, garlic bulbs) may also do well.

nettles are a big one that have delicious and nutritious greens that can be cut a couple times a year for soups and tea. their leaves are some of the most densely packed nutrient rich medicines around!

meadowsweet may do well with all the moisture - a famous strewing herb, it also has various medicinal components (can take a fever down) and is absolutely beautiful. good pollinator as well. Jerusalem artichokes also do well in just about any environment and will keep you in tubers for a lifetime!
 
pollinator
Posts: 11802
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1051
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mulberry, elderberry, blackberry, Black Willow, Canada Onion, maybe Linden. Hazelnuts?

 
Posts: 28
2
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a similar problem on back acreage near creek.   I am currently watching stuff die, I plant new things back there every year to see how it fares and a foot of rain in the last week....well stuff's dying.  
 I do grow elderberries, mullberry trees, may-haw trees, Chickasaw plum trees and some pawpaws back there.   They are all getting big now and get flooded several times a year.
 
Today's lesson is that you can't wear a jetpack AND a cape. I should have read this tiny ad:
Permaculture Community Garden fundraising effort - You can Win Stuff!!!
https://permies.com/t/152211/Permaculture-Community-Garden-fundraising-effort
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic