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I want to move to the tropics. BUT......

 
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Hello all.  IAM a 19 year old man with my future ahead of me. I would like to move to the tropics one day. I would like at least a couple acres of land for goats or a cow, and fruits and vegetables. A safe country would be preferred but as long as they would leave me alone that would be fine with me. I would like to to start a family one day, and I would like to homeschool my children. So being allowed to do that would be a major consideration.
I am used to the heat and humidity. I live in Mississippi and work on a farm. I just can't stand the cold!.
Is there anything else I should consider in choosing a tropical country?? Iam young and realize there's a lot I don't know. I would welcome your wise input. If you live in the tropics I would like to know what you like and don't like about the climate. Thanks y'all for any and all input.
 
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You need to consider first of all practical issues, if you can own/buy own land, resident permits, if not, visa runs to the border, etc... Or, you might find a girlfriend from a tropical area, and marry, maybe, but be aware that if might be for the wrong reasons ... Then there is the issue with language, security etc... and not everything is rosy in the tropics: big snakes and a lot of bugs, monsoon, thunderstorms, different customs (good and bad).
But yes, I know that many of us are more suited to warm climates, but you live in the US, and you have a huge diversity of climates there, maybe you should consider to start looking there?
I was a long time like you, asking, "where?", but in fact, you might also need to consider "with whom", (a partner, a friend, a group, a community, a neighbourhood).
 
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You may find this thread interesting, and I seem to remember others on similar topics, might be worth having a search.
https://permies.com/t/97018/Tropical-Locations-Buy-Land
 
pollinator
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Location: Salt Lake Valley, Utah, hardiness zone 6b/7a
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Before making a "permanent" move, spend at least one full year in a place that never cools off and you don't have air-conditioning.  Even if you don't find any problems with it, your body might.  Try the Peace Corps or another volunteer organization, or look for opportunities as a laborer (anticipate being exploited).

I agree that transitioning to a different culture and society would be easier if you could find a partner from the area, but you may be hard pressed to find one who would agree to live an austere lifestyle in the sticks.  Finding acceptance in a rural community can be a never ending struggle anywhere in the world, including the US.  Moving to a developing country as a person with a different culture, race, religion, language, etc. seriously exacerbates the process and possible dangers.

It may be easier to look for places where the people are accustomed to seeing foreigners.  Most of Latin America would qualify, though the farther you get from cities and tourist spots, the less comfortable people will be with strangers.  Also, in poorer areas, people assume that all Americans and Euros are rich, so you might become a target for thieves, scammers and kidnappers.

If you do move, don't be the ugly american (or euro).  Be respectful.  Learn the language.  Never disparage.  Don't comment on sensitive subjects, and make yourself aware of what those subjects are.

All that being said, many people do it, to varying degrees of success and/or failure.

Now, my specific experience is Ecuador.  Great place, but I would wait until this pandemic is over and the economy and any socio-political turmoil has stabilized.  They are used to Americans and Euros.  They don't like arrogant fools but they will tolerate them if they have money.  Good agricultural land there is pricey, often on par with US land prices, but if you look around, you could probably find something affordable.  A lot of plantations are infected with this or that and are no longer productive for what they were developed for, but the land can be repurposed.  Plantation owners usually find it cheaper to develop virgin land and sell off their infected properties, if they can.  Check the laws on foreign ownership of land.  Also, learn what the current agricultural reform and land tenure laws and policies are.  They change frequently.
 
Tereza Okava
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I said my piece in the other thread, but Andrew has great points that I agree with here about living abroad as an expat.

The epidemic is going to cause long-lasting upheavals everywhere. Here in Latin America (I am an American in Brazil) we don't even have the first inkling of how this is going to affect us long-term. The only thing we can be sure of is that the repercussions are probably going to be on an extremely large scale and affect everyone.
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