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Making More Use of Mason Jars

 
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Really missing the boat here.  There are a number of products that come with plastic lids the lids will fit.  For example the green sprinkle lids listed above come on sprinkle cheese containers.   They also work for straws.  The straw goes in a sprinkle cheese shaker hole. Not all of them work but some of the Parmesan sprinkle cheese container are mason jar thread.(still trying to decide if it is brand or just the current jar supplier for a brand.) Some small peanut butter lids work.  Some mayo and salad dressing lids also work as does at least miracle whip lids.
 
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Bonnie Kuhlman wrote:I have some glass lids for mason jars but can't find the tops/rings to use with them.  The regular canning rings don't have enough depth to hold the glass lid on the jar.  Here are a few on ebay, but they are difficult to find.  If anyone knows where to find these, please share.  Or maybe if they hear from enough people, the jar manufacturers will start producing them.  Thanks.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ball-Presto-Atlas-Boyds-old-Mason-Jar-Zinc-Glass-Canning-Lids-LOT-of-11/382530069464?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D52885%26meid%3D6342d8ace0ae46c99b0f887b834c1547%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D223120396718%26itm%3D382530069464&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109

Bonnie


I am curious... are these just collector's items, or is there a special advantage to using these glass lids?  I don't immediately see the purpose, especially given that you can't use them with the normal Ball hardware (rings).  The eBay seller to whom you linked didn't explain.
 
Matthew Nistico
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Rebecca Norman wrote:My sister has a jarware lemon squeezer that fits right on a mason jar, and it works great. I like it better than free standing lemon squeezers.


I note that originally no link was provided for this product, but I found it easily enough on amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/Jarware-82617-Juicer-Mouth-Yellow/dp/B01410LHK6/ref=pd_sbs_79_1/130-2940913-7281906?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01410LHK6&pd_rd_r=c0efeaf3-57d5-11e9-a634-633eb631cbdf&pd_rd_w=Q5F1o&pd_rd_wg=37MIz&pf_rd_p=588939de-d3f8-42f1-a3d8-d556eae5797d&pf_rd_r=VWV48D1KXTAT4KPVHH1H&psc=1&refRID=VWV48D1KXTAT4KPVHH1H




But I noticed that the same company also sells an upgraded version, albeit for triple the price:  https://www.amazon.com/Jarware-82654-Citrus-Juicer-Stainless/dp/B07MZRW7JQ/ref=asc_df_B07MZRW7JQ/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309777441804&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6750494747668995619&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9010619&hvtargid=pla-668637467444&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=61290892763&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=309777441804&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6750494747668995619&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9010619&hvtargid=pla-668637467444





Given that the total price is still within reasonable limits for a kitchen gadget, I am willing to invest in a more durable, plastic-free option.  I also like that this one has more of a lip around the edge to capture the juice and seeds, whereas it seems the plastic one would be more likely to spill the juice, which one reviewer also mentioned.
 
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Matthew Nistico wrote:

Bonnie Kuhlman wrote:I have some glass lids for mason jars but can't find the tops/rings to use with them.  The regular canning rings don't have enough depth to hold the glass lid on the jar.  Here are a few on ebay, but they are difficult to find.  If anyone knows where to find these, please share.  Or maybe if they hear from enough people, the jar manufacturers will start producing them.  Thanks.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ball-Presto-Atlas-Boyds-old-Mason-Jar-Zinc-Glass-Canning-Lids-LOT-of-11/382530069464?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D52885%26meid%3D6342d8ace0ae46c99b0f887b834c1547%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D223120396718%26itm%3D382530069464&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109

Bonnie


I am curious... are these just collector's items, or is there a special advantage to using these glass lids?  I don't immediately see the purpose, especially given that you can't use them with the normal Ball hardware (rings).  The eBay seller to whom you linked didn't explain.



Weck makes jars with the glass lid/ rubber gasket combo, but they're pretty expensive (at least, outside of Europe).  The nice thing about the glass lids is they don't rust and nothing can leech out of them (though really, your food shouldn't be in contact with the lid anyway, but for the purpose of argument).  I've never tried them myself, but I think the Weck jars are easier to open than Tattler lids (the reusable plastic ones) because there's a pull-tab on the rubber gasket to loosen the seal.  I'd imagine that shortens the life of the gasket, though.
 
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Matthew Nistico wrote:

Bonnie Kuhlman wrote:I have some glass lids for mason jars but can't find the tops/rings to use with them.  The regular canning rings don't have enough depth to hold the glass lid on the jar.  Here are a few on ebay, but they are difficult to find.  If anyone knows where to find these, please share.  Or maybe if they hear from enough people, the jar manufacturers will start producing them.  Thanks.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ball-Presto-Atlas-Boyds-old-Mason-Jar-Zinc-Glass-Canning-Lids-LOT-of-11/382530069464?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D52885%26meid%3D6342d8ace0ae46c99b0f887b834c1547%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D223120396718%26itm%3D382530069464&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109

Bonnie


I am curious... are these just collector's items, or is there a special advantage to using these glass lids?  I don't immediately see the purpose, especially given that you can't use them with the normal Ball hardware (rings).  The eBay seller to whom you linked didn't explain.



They might be collectors' items, but I want them for food storage and fermenting, and for canning.  I'm an herbalist and I macerate tinctures in glass.  I don't like plastic and the metal lids also have BPA in the lining (or something similarly offensive) and they can't be used with acidic foods.  Without the rubber ring, the newer rings will barely fit, but with the rubber rings, they will not.  

Bonnie
 
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Matthew Nistico wrote:

Rebecca Norman wrote:My sister has a jarware lemon squeezer that fits right on a mason jar, and it works great. I like it better than free standing lemon squeezers.



But I noticed that the same company also sells an upgraded version, albeit for triple the price:  https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN/B07MZRW7JQ/rs12-20 (Jocelyn edited Matthew's link for a shorter permies affiliate link)



Given that the total price is still within reasonable limits for a kitchen gadget, I am willing to invest in a more durable, plastic-free option.  I also like that this one has more of a lip around the edge to capture the juice and seeds, whereas it seems the plastic one would be more likely to spill the juice, which one reviewer also mentioned.


This is brilliant. I just ordered it because we did not have a simple citrus juicer here. I have a vintage crank one that is mostly aluminum that we use a lot. I like this design better than the glass dish style citrus juicers because this mason jar juicer will filter out seeds. Nice!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Also, from the Best Non Electric Coffee Grinder thread, this coffee grinder comes with a jar, but fits on top of mason jars, too.

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:

Adrien Lapointe wrote:



I bought this one for base camp, too. For similar reasons as Ann - didn't want to be without should the power cut out! What I like about the Hario is that is a ceramic grinder for those foodies that might visit us(!), with a glass base, and that the top part screws onto a mason jar if you'd like a larger container or accidentally break the one that comes with it. I tried it, and it does work!

Here is the empire supporting link:
Hario ceramic coffee grinder with a glass base


 
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Tim Siemens wrote:To hold the veggies down below the brine for a ferment, you can use a 1/4 pint jar in the neck of a larger widemouth jar.  It just fits. Press it down and then use the wide mouth to hold the small jar down.



I am not sure I understand… do you mean that you need the small jar to be closed totally inside the big jar? And then that you screw the lid of the bigger jar?

About sprouting, I ownder why to not just use an elastic and a piece of mosquito net, and whatever allows you to give it the right position instead of buying specific devices that are meant ONLY for holding your jars. Sometimes re-use is minimalist, and sometimes it looks as if we need to buy more!
 
Xisca Nicolas
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I just use them a lot as glasses or cups. Their lid makes them fly-proof!

As I need to filter my citric juices, I have a normal lemon juicer, but one in glass and not plastic. Then I put the filter on the jar and pour the lemon juice. Then close and keep for drinking from the jar, with or without added water.

I use jars for breaking each egg searately in case one is not good. then I can separate the yolk if needed. And with the lid I can save the white for future use.

I use a tall jar for my cotton filter for coffee, because it is too long to keep during filtering, and it does not fit in a cup!  

I put each daily milk from the ewe in a different jar, until I get the separation of whey naturally on the counter top.

I have countless jars full of seeds....


When I finish a jar of coconut oil, I "clean" the jar with my morning coffee… Nice taste and less soap for cleaning!
 
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I preserve most of my blackberries each year by making cordial.  

I started by using regular quart Mason type jars, but found it's much easier to decant them from the wide-mouth jars, as I smoosh the fruit to get the last bit of volume and flavor.  I have a narrow bottle that fits inside the wide mouth for this task, and then I screw on sprouting lids to act as sieves to pour out into the final decorative and labelled bottles.  I'd been using the metal lid and ring.  But sometimes they leak when shaking the jar to dissolve the requisite sugar in the recipe.  This year I discovered that Ball makes a leak-free BPA-free plastic cover.



I bought Mainstay brand lids by mistake and returned them.  They leak!
I think I'll have much less hassle with this type of lid.  I've had to work hard to remove the two piece style, sometimes having to destroy it in the process.

Last year's crop:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVwjPi6F-17/

(not sure how to bring photos over from Instagram.)

 
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When I was looking into the Kratky method of hydroponics using Folger's coffee cans, and trying to decide on which size of net cup to buy, I found a video by a guy on YouTube saying all he uses are the 3" cups because they fit a widemouth mason jar perfectly. So I bought a 3" hole saw for the Folger's lids and ordered a set of these: https://amzn.to/2YgzyoW

I'm not likely to use the mason jars for full-bore hydroponics because I'd have to block the light, and that's extra work, but I can use them to get cuttings started that I can transfer into the opaque Folger's cans, and there are lots of other fermenting exploits I know they'll be good for. I got the white instead of the black net, and I can use them to keep vegetables submerged under brine. I also use these silicone fermenting tops, and they fit well on top of the net cups, leaving enough room to screw the ring on tightly: https://amzn.to/2YgzWUq

 
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I have a ton of mason jars and just recently got some pump cover things so that they can be used to dispense soap, pretty handy. Other than that they get used as water glasses and of course for canning. Some good tips in here for them!
 
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I wanted to  to get away from plastic in travel mugs and got this awhile back.
 It works well, with one caveat: thermal conductivity means that the lid is the same temp as the liquid. So if you try to sip scalding coffee, you burn your lips along with your tongue.
 
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mason jars are awesome for vacuum storage. Install a tire valve on the lid. I use my converted vacuum sealer to vacuum it.
 
Diane Kistner
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julian Gerona wrote:mason jars are awesome for vacuum storage. Install a tire valve on the lid. I use my converted vacuum sealer to vacuum it.



Oh, that reminds me! I really like these: https://amzn.to/2XwQsCC

I have an earlier version of these in both widemouth and regular sizes that work with Foodsaver's now-discontinued wine saver device (a wand with a pointed end). When that dies, I'll have to see if I can't rig something else to do the job...or find a manual sealing pump that I can adapt with the tip to still work.

 
julian Gerona
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If you dont have a vacuum pump you can also boil the jars with its lid tight or simply heat it anywhere. The pressure will ease on the one way valve and vacuum itself upon cooling down
 
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Rather than preserving Foods it might be better to eat seasonally by eating fruit and such during the summer and eating only meat and fat during winter by doing that you could mimic our ancestors natural diet when we came out of the forest into the savannas. When we did this we evolved to be able to eat a keto diet or carnivore diet along with fasting and endurance running for hunting. In More Southern climates it will likely be better to eat fruit and such during winter when everything is green and eat Meats during summer when everything is dry.by eating a seasonal diet you be able to eat as much as you like during the green times and then lose weight during the dry times or cold times. Not to mention the healing effects of the ketogenic diet once you get into ketosis.
 
Xisca Nicolas
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julian Gerona wrote:If you dont have a vacuum pump you can also boil the jars with its lid tight or simply heat it anywhere. The pressure will ease on the one way valve and vacuum itself upon cooling down



Surprising… I doubt it is enough to create a real full vacuum!
And think that you Will not be able to keep raw food as you are with the vacuum pump!
 
Xisca Nicolas
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lol when out of topic can be full topic…

connor burke wrote:Rather than preserving Foods it might be better to eat seasonally by eating fruit and such during the summer and eating only meat and fat during winter by doing that you could mimic our ancestors natural diet when we came out of the forest into the savannas. When we did this we evolved to be able to eat a keto diet or carnivore diet along with fasting and endurance running for hunting. In More Southern climates it will likely be better to eat fruit and such during winter when everything is green and eat Meats during summer when everything is dry.by eating a seasonal diet you be able to eat as much as you like during the green times and then lose weight during the dry times or cold times. Not to mention the healing effects of the ketogenic diet once you get into ketosis.



I agree and not at the same time, because what do you do when you have too much of something in season? Isn't it better to keep it anyway?

I agree that I preserve much less since I live in the subtropics…

And yes the paradox is that we should eat carbs during heat, and fat during cold, and that it is reversed where summer is dry and gives almost no fresh carbs!

Keto is not healing for everybody and some cannot handle it long term, so the interest is indeed to be keto no more than part of the year. Except for people who do not handle carbs, but those people already know how that have to manage… We can become resistant to more than insulin… Sooo… For those who handle carbs, getting a break resets your cortisol receptors, which seems to be useful.
 
connor burke
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"lol when out of topic can be full topic."
Maybe i should repost it as a thing of its own in the food area.

"I agree and not at the same time, because what do you do when you have too much of something in season? Isn't it better to keep it anyway? I agree that I preserve much less since I live in the subtropics"
My solution is to feed the extra to any animal that wants to eat it so that the soil and beastie will gain value from it.
 
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I use these for lacto-fermenting veggies (my son loves to make pickled jalapeño slices):

https://shop.culturesforhealth.com/collections/vegetables/products/complete-mason-jar-fermentation-kit




The coffee grinder and the lemon juicer look really interesting!  I'll have to check those out some more.
 
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for those old mason jars with glass lids:

i have found some silicone gaskets at michaels before.  the old rubber seals were the best but cant seem to find them anymore.  (over a period of use, they dry rot).  i have found on amazon too.

the old jars with glass lids are hard to find too !!  i inherited several from an aunt who canned pickles.  they are huge !!  great for storing oats and flours !!
gaskets.jpg
[Thumbnail for gaskets.jpg]
 
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I use wide mouth mason jars painted black in a solar cooker.
SAVE_20200730_075223.jpg
Panel cooker
Panel cooker
 
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Diane Kistner wrote:

julian Gerona wrote:mason jars are awesome for vacuum storage. Install a tire valve on the lid. I use my converted vacuum sealer to vacuum it.



Oh, that reminds me! I really like these: https://amzn.to/2XwQsCC

I have an earlier version of these in both widemouth and regular sizes that work with Foodsaver's now-discontinued wine saver device (a wand with a pointed end). When that dies, I'll have to see if I can't rig something else to do the job...or find a manual sealing pump that I can adapt with the tip to still work.



I use mason jars to vacuum store dry goods that would go rancid if exposed to oxygen. The Foodsaver jar attachment Diane linked to is easy to use with any vacuum sealer that has a hose attachment. I used to store pecans and other nuts in my freezer, but vacuuming works better, keeps longer, and frees up space in my freezer. Vacuumed jars allow me to buy things like spices in bulk and keep them fresh long term until I use them up. Other food items that would go stale if exposed to air keep very well when vacuumed. I used to throw out the remainder of specialty items I would buy for cooking, as they would go bad before I used them up. At the store, I would hesitate to buy things because I did not want to throw part of it away. I no longer have to worry about that.

I have learned a few tricks for using the jar lid attachments:

The small mouth jar adapter needs a little help to work well, try stacking two lids on top instead of one when vacuuming to get it to seal properly. You may have to pry the second lid off when done, or you can just leave it there.

Prying off lids without damaging can sometimes be tough. I use the square end of a cooking chopstick to pry between the lid and the jar thread until I hear a whoosh of air. A wooden spatula also works. Prying with metal will damage the lids.

I use some specialty flours that can go rancid. Vacuum sealing flour or other powders is problematic. The seal has to be perfectly clean or it will slowly leak.  As you vacuum them, you will see horizontal air pockets forming in the flour as the air is evacuated. When these pockets collapse, it creates a cloud of flour at the top, which then gets under the seal and causes leaks. I solved that problem by using a chopstick to poke a hole down the center of the flour, and then carefully removing the chopstick to leave an air channel that prevents the air pockets from forming. Once I figured that out, I stopped having leaks. Coffee stores well in a vacuum, and unless you have expresso grind, the grounds are porous enough that layers don't form while vacuuming.

You can get oxygen absorbers (or make your own) to put in the jars. These will absorb any remaining oxygen (no vacuum is perfect, Foodsavers are usually 80% or so) and extend your shelf life. I also save desiccant packets, dry them in a low oven, and add them to some of my jars.

If you don't have the Foodsaver jar lid adapters, or for non mason jars, the alternative method is to punch a hole in the lid, cover it with a small piece of electrical tape, and use an adaptor cup over the tape to vacuum the air out. I made my adaptor from a small funnel with a gasket added to allow sealing to flat surfaces.

Using these vacuum sealing methods, I have extended the shelf life of many perishable dry goods indefinitely, and freed up a lot of space in my freezer. (which then gets filled with vacuum sealed bags of perishable foods, but that is a whole other subject)

 
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I'm loving this thread!  We use them for drinking cups and the like, but they do break on a regular basis when taking in the go, so I'm super excited about the sleeve!!  I make yogurt in them by sticking them in the dehydrator. . . that's the only other thing I didn't see mentioned.  Thanks for all the ideas!
 
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Freezer queen here. It’s berry picking time. Mason jars make excellent containers for freezing. Flash freeze your berries on a cookie sheet and then fill your jars. If you freeze liquids in your jars, leave some room for expansion and only use straight sided jars. Curvy ones can crack!  Yep. I learned by mistake. So ditch those zip lock bags. Our earth cannot digest plastic. And while you’re at it, check out my children’s book here. We need to teach our kids about the harmful effects of plastic!  https://www.amazon.com/Lizzabelle-Plastic-Bottle-color-interior/dp/1734418915/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=lizzabelle+and+the+plastic+bottle+color&qid=1595474065&sprefix=lizzab&sr=8-1
 
Diane Kistner
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L Cho wrote:

I have learned a few tricks for using the jar lid attachments:

The small mouth jar adapter needs a little help to work well, try stacking two lids on top instead of one when vacuuming to get it to seal properly. You may have to pry the second lid off when done, or you can just leave it there.





Great tip!
 
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Bonnie Kuhlman wrote:I have some glass lids for mason jars but can't find the tops/rings to use with them.  The regular canning rings don't have enough depth to hold the glass lid on the jar.  Here are a few on ebay, but they are difficult to find.  If anyone knows where to find these, please share.  Or maybe if they hear from enough people, the jar manufacturers will start producing them.  Thanks.
Bonnie



O.K., all of you Mason Jar fanatics, here you go - canning lids galore.     https://canninglids.com/shop/

You can always ask on the Web Site if you have specific needs. They may be able to help you.

ALSO, have you heard of the  JAR  BOX ?  These are heavy duty plastic "Clam Shells" made in sizes specifically to protect PINT jars and Quart jars. Expensive, YES, at around $11.00 at my last purchase, but I dropped one off of the top of a load of FIVE boxes high on a dolly and although the corner that hit the cement walk cracked out - ALL 12 PINT JARS WERE INTACT, NO CRACKS EVEN!! You have to really shop around as some sites offer these for up to around $25 ea.  The clam shells can be tie-wrapped together and an the included plastic ID plate tie-wrapped to the end. I always PRINT the contents on paper, in large text, and tape that to the ID plate.
 
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Freezing and heating...

I freeze soups, stews, etc. in wide-mouth pints using storage lids. (The ones from Ball, not the ones from Walmart which are worthless.) Then, I can take out one serving and pop it in the instant pot on slow cook, sitting on the rack with an inch of water below. It will be defrosted and ready to eat in an hour and a half, but you can wait much longer if you need (leaving it on slow cook). This works for me because I'm always at home and have a hard time finding time to prepare a meal. I don't have to know exactly when I'll eat, just remember that I'll need to eat in a couple of hours and stick something in the pot. The jars will give out and the bottoms pop off after a year or two, but that is fairly rare when using the slow cook setting only. (I have used pressure cook to get my food ready faster, but the jars only last a dozen uses or so which leads to too-frequent loss of food. It's really disappointing to lift your jar out and have the bottom and all the contents stay behind.)
 
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So, my one big hesitation in using a lot of these alternate tops, is that I often struggle getting the usual rings off, and end up destroying them, in the process. I'm concerned that I'll spend the money to get a really cool top, then not be able to get it off, without destroying it. When my troubled hands can't manage, and a towel or silicone grippers don't help, and that thing just has to come off, I end up resorting to a metal gripper thingie, designed to take them off - but it leaves horrid dents, and often, the rings are entirely unusable, afterward. I've tried just not tightening them as much, but then, they don't seal properly. How do you get the lids, rings, etc, off?
 
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How do you avoid the nuisance of your Mason jar lids rising when you do sprouts? Mine rusted shut so badly I had to use a wrench to open it!!
 
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That red neck wine glad is great. You could make your own. The bottom looks like a candle stick holder they sell at dollar tree.
 
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Rebecca, what a great idea. I want one of these for sure. Thanks, cherrie
 
L Cho
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D.W. Stratton wrote:How do you avoid the nuisance of your Mason jar lids rising when you do sprouts? Mine rusted shut so badly I had to use a wrench to open it!!



(I am guessing that rising was supposed to say rusting)
I have seen several vendors on amazon and elsewhere selling stainless steel lids and rings. A little lubricant on the threads should keep them from sticking. I would use food grade non oxidizing lubricant. I have used shortening as it takes a long time to go rancid, and cleans off fairly easily between uses. Food grade mineral oil would also work. Thoroughly drying the threads and rings before closing should also reduce rusting.
 
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L Cho wrote:

D.W. Stratton wrote:How do you avoid the nuisance of your Mason jar lids rising when you do sprouts? Mine rusted shut so badly I had to use a wrench to open it!!



They do make PLASTIC lids also. You might have to cut holes in them, but they certainly would not rust.

Here is a good source for canning lid, rings, etc. as shown in a post above.    https://canninglids.com/shop/

 
Diane Kistner
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r ranson wrote:

this one might be good for making kimchi.



This looks like a Harsch-crock-style waterlock thingie. The link says page not available. Anyone know where this might be found?

 
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I really liked the spout for the canning jars.  I haven't seen that before.  Thank you for the informative post.
 
Matthew Nistico
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S Tonin wrote:

Matthew Nistico wrote:

Bonnie Kuhlman wrote:I have some glass lids for mason jars but can't find the tops/rings to use with them.  The regular canning rings don't have enough depth to hold the glass lid on the jar.  Here are a few on ebay, but they are difficult to find.  If anyone knows where to find these, please share.  Or maybe if they hear from enough people, the jar manufacturers will start producing them.  Thanks.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ball-Presto-Atlas-Boyds-old-Mason-Jar-Zinc-Glass-Canning-Lids-LOT-of-11/382530069464?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D52885%26meid%3D6342d8ace0ae46c99b0f887b834c1547%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D223120396718%26itm%3D382530069464&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109

Bonnie


I am curious... are these just collector's items, or is there a special advantage to using these glass lids?  I don't immediately see the purpose, especially given that you can't use them with the normal Ball hardware (rings).  The eBay seller to whom you linked didn't explain.


Weck makes jars with the glass lid/ rubber gasket combo, but they're pretty expensive (at least, outside of Europe).  The nice thing about the glass lids is they don't rust and nothing can leech out of them (though really, your food shouldn't be in contact with the lid anyway, but for the purpose of argument).  I've never tried them myself, but I think the Weck jars are easier to open than Tattler lids (the reusable plastic ones) because there's a pull-tab on the rubber gasket to loosen the seal.  I'd imagine that shortens the life of the gasket, though.



Okay, I now totally understand the value of a glass lid on a mason jar!  Since this initial exchange over a year ago, I have gotten into preserving lemons, Moroccan style.  You ferment whole lemons in salt and lemon juice, producing these wonderfully silky, mushy, salty, shelf-stable products that go great into salad dressing (diced finely, peel and all), not to mention all manner of traditional North African dishes.  They have a unique taste, still lemony, but also with the tang of a pickle.  You don't can them; just ferment them at room temperature in as close to a sterilized vessel as you can produce.  Technically this can be achieved in any tight-sealing glass or ceramic container that can be boiled.  Mason jars are an obvious choice.

Except that I've discovered the salt corrodes the hell out of the metal rings, to the point that every single time opening the jars requires hot water and grippy tools and entirely too much effort.  Enter: <DRUM ROLL> glass top lids!  Unfortunately, I can no longer find the glass lids that were discussed above.  Thank goodness there are many options on Amazon for jars with flip-top glass lids.  As already mentioned here...

ana wynne wrote:for those old mason jars with glass lids:

i have found some silicone gaskets at michaels before.  the old rubber seals were the best but cant seem to find them anymore.  (over a period of use, they dry rot).  i have found on amazon too.

the old jars with glass lids are hard to find too !!  i inherited several from an aunt who canned pickles.  they are huge !!  great for storing oats and flours !!



...they tend to be very large, more like canisters than regular-sized mason jars.  And I could not find anyone selling just the lids; you generally have to buy the jars with the lids.  But they aren't too expensive, and one can never invest too much in kitchen wares that could potentially last a lifetime.  I purchased these, and am very happy so far:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07KRZP2P9/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

These were pretty much the smallest I could find at a good price, and they come with an extra set of rubber gaskets.

BTW, if anyone else is interested in preserving lemons, this technique is mentioned in the following threads:

https://permies.com/t/16727/Lemon-Peels
https://permies.com/t/131270/kitchen/fermenting-kitchen
https://permies.com/t/40/37682/kitchen/discussion-lacto-fermentation-methods-recipes#350407

This is the article I used as a guide in my own experiment, which has proven highly successful so far:

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/preserved-lemons-231570

I used Meyer lemons from my parents' tree, which worked supremely well.  When those began to run low, I bought organic grocery store lemons and added those to the fermenting jars.  In this way, you can reuse the fermenting liquid for a good while: just keep topping off the jar with new lemons as the old are eaten!  Note: take out the old ones first, so that the newer ones can be inserted into the bottom, and then the older lemons put back in on top.  That way you will use the older lemons up first and, if you plan it well, the newer ones will get at least a whole month to ferment.

Though perhaps even longer would be better - the Meyers were fine after one month, but they have thin skins.  They are also much milder flavored off of the tree.  I ate the first of the grocery store lemons recently and it had a very different flavor, an intense, almost chemical-lemon flavor.  I'd definitely recommend Meyer lemons if you can get some, but perhaps these new lemons will improve with more fermenting time for their thicker rinds to soften and loose bitterness.

And definitely be sure to use only plastic or wooden tongs, or latex gloves, to remove lemons from the jar once fermented, as advised in the Epicurious article.  If you maintain this discipline, then I can confirm that the jars do just fine out of refrigeration for extended periods.  I've been dipping out of mine for more than six months now, and they've never seen the inside of a refrigerator!  When they reach a whole year, perhaps I will start again with salt and lemon juice to create a new batch with fresh pickling liquid.
 
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