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Making More Use of Mason Jars

 
pollinator
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Really missing the boat here.  There are a number of products that come with plastic lids the lids will fit.  For example the green sprinkle lids listed above come on sprinkle cheese containers.   They also work for straws.  The straw goes in a sprinkle cheese shaker hole. Not all of them work but some of the Parmesan sprinkle cheese container are mason jar thread.(still trying to decide if it is brand or just the current jar supplier for a brand.) Some small peanut butter lids work.  Some mayo and salad dressing lids also work as does at least miracle whip lids.
 
pollinator
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Bonnie Kuhlman wrote:I have some glass lids for mason jars but can't find the tops/rings to use with them.  The regular canning rings don't have enough depth to hold the glass lid on the jar.  Here are a few on ebay, but they are difficult to find.  If anyone knows where to find these, please share.  Or maybe if they hear from enough people, the jar manufacturers will start producing them.  Thanks.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ball-Presto-Atlas-Boyds-old-Mason-Jar-Zinc-Glass-Canning-Lids-LOT-of-11/382530069464?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D52885%26meid%3D6342d8ace0ae46c99b0f887b834c1547%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D223120396718%26itm%3D382530069464&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109

Bonnie


I am curious... are these just collector's items, or is there a special advantage to using these glass lids?  I don't immediately see the purpose, especially given that you can't use them with the normal Ball hardware (rings).  The eBay seller to whom you linked didn't explain.
 
Matthew Nistico
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Rebecca Norman wrote:My sister has a jarware lemon squeezer that fits right on a mason jar, and it works great. I like it better than free standing lemon squeezers.


I note that originally no link was provided for this product, but I found it easily enough on amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/Jarware-82617-Juicer-Mouth-Yellow/dp/B01410LHK6/ref=pd_sbs_79_1/130-2940913-7281906?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01410LHK6&pd_rd_r=c0efeaf3-57d5-11e9-a634-633eb631cbdf&pd_rd_w=Q5F1o&pd_rd_wg=37MIz&pf_rd_p=588939de-d3f8-42f1-a3d8-d556eae5797d&pf_rd_r=VWV48D1KXTAT4KPVHH1H&psc=1&refRID=VWV48D1KXTAT4KPVHH1H




But I noticed that the same company also sells an upgraded version, albeit for triple the price:  https://www.amazon.com/Jarware-82654-Citrus-Juicer-Stainless/dp/B07MZRW7JQ/ref=asc_df_B07MZRW7JQ/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309777441804&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6750494747668995619&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9010619&hvtargid=pla-668637467444&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=61290892763&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=309777441804&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6750494747668995619&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9010619&hvtargid=pla-668637467444





Given that the total price is still within reasonable limits for a kitchen gadget, I am willing to invest in a more durable, plastic-free option.  I also like that this one has more of a lip around the edge to capture the juice and seeds, whereas it seems the plastic one would be more likely to spill the juice, which one reviewer also mentioned.
 
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Matthew Nistico wrote:

Bonnie Kuhlman wrote:I have some glass lids for mason jars but can't find the tops/rings to use with them.  The regular canning rings don't have enough depth to hold the glass lid on the jar.  Here are a few on ebay, but they are difficult to find.  If anyone knows where to find these, please share.  Or maybe if they hear from enough people, the jar manufacturers will start producing them.  Thanks.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ball-Presto-Atlas-Boyds-old-Mason-Jar-Zinc-Glass-Canning-Lids-LOT-of-11/382530069464?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D52885%26meid%3D6342d8ace0ae46c99b0f887b834c1547%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D223120396718%26itm%3D382530069464&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109

Bonnie


I am curious... are these just collector's items, or is there a special advantage to using these glass lids?  I don't immediately see the purpose, especially given that you can't use them with the normal Ball hardware (rings).  The eBay seller to whom you linked didn't explain.



Weck makes jars with the glass lid/ rubber gasket combo, but they're pretty expensive (at least, outside of Europe).  The nice thing about the glass lids is they don't rust and nothing can leech out of them (though really, your food shouldn't be in contact with the lid anyway, but for the purpose of argument).  I've never tried them myself, but I think the Weck jars are easier to open than Tattler lids (the reusable plastic ones) because there's a pull-tab on the rubber gasket to loosen the seal.  I'd imagine that shortens the life of the gasket, though.
 
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Matthew Nistico wrote:

Bonnie Kuhlman wrote:I have some glass lids for mason jars but can't find the tops/rings to use with them.  The regular canning rings don't have enough depth to hold the glass lid on the jar.  Here are a few on ebay, but they are difficult to find.  If anyone knows where to find these, please share.  Or maybe if they hear from enough people, the jar manufacturers will start producing them.  Thanks.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ball-Presto-Atlas-Boyds-old-Mason-Jar-Zinc-Glass-Canning-Lids-LOT-of-11/382530069464?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D52885%26meid%3D6342d8ace0ae46c99b0f887b834c1547%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D223120396718%26itm%3D382530069464&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109

Bonnie


I am curious... are these just collector's items, or is there a special advantage to using these glass lids?  I don't immediately see the purpose, especially given that you can't use them with the normal Ball hardware (rings).  The eBay seller to whom you linked didn't explain.



They might be collectors' items, but I want them for food storage and fermenting, and for canning.  I'm an herbalist and I macerate tinctures in glass.  I don't like plastic and the metal lids also have BPA in the lining (or something similarly offensive) and they can't be used with acidic foods.  Without the rubber ring, the newer rings will barely fit, but with the rubber rings, they will not.  

Bonnie
 
steward
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Matthew Nistico wrote:

Rebecca Norman wrote:My sister has a jarware lemon squeezer that fits right on a mason jar, and it works great. I like it better than free standing lemon squeezers.



But I noticed that the same company also sells an upgraded version, albeit for triple the price:  https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN/B07MZRW7JQ/rs12-20 (Jocelyn edited Matthew's link for a shorter permies affiliate link)



Given that the total price is still within reasonable limits for a kitchen gadget, I am willing to invest in a more durable, plastic-free option.  I also like that this one has more of a lip around the edge to capture the juice and seeds, whereas it seems the plastic one would be more likely to spill the juice, which one reviewer also mentioned.


This is brilliant. I just ordered it because we did not have a simple citrus juicer here. I have a vintage crank one that is mostly aluminum that we use a lot. I like this design better than the glass dish style citrus juicers because this mason jar juicer will filter out seeds. Nice!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Also, from the Best Non Electric Coffee Grinder thread, this coffee grinder comes with a jar, but fits on top of mason jars, too.

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:

Adrien Lapointe wrote:



I bought this one for base camp, too. For similar reasons as Ann - didn't want to be without should the power cut out! What I like about the Hario is that is a ceramic grinder for those foodies that might visit us(!), with a glass base, and that the top part screws onto a mason jar if you'd like a larger container or accidentally break the one that comes with it. I tried it, and it does work!

Here is the empire supporting link:
Hario ceramic coffee grinder with a glass base


 
pollinator
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i found one too!...lol
https://www.amazon.com/The-Pens-and-More-Store/dp/B01GL8SS4O/ref=sr_1_37?keywords=manual&qid=1555235820&s=gateway&sr=8-37
71JrRYpgB6L._SY500_.jpg
[Thumbnail for 71JrRYpgB6L._SY500_.jpg]
 
pollinator
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Tim Siemens wrote:To hold the veggies down below the brine for a ferment, you can use a 1/4 pint jar in the neck of a larger widemouth jar.  It just fits. Press it down and then use the wide mouth to hold the small jar down.



I am not sure I understand… do you mean that you need the small jar to be closed totally inside the big jar? And then that you screw the lid of the bigger jar?

About sprouting, I ownder why to not just use an elastic and a piece of mosquito net, and whatever allows you to give it the right position instead of buying specific devices that are meant ONLY for holding your jars. Sometimes re-use is minimalist, and sometimes it looks as if we need to buy more!
 
Xisca Nicolas
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I just use them a lot as glasses or cups. Their lid makes them fly-proof!

As I need to filter my citric juices, I have a normal lemon juicer, but one in glass and not plastic. Then I put the filter on the jar and pour the lemon juice. Then close and keep for drinking from the jar, with or without added water.

I use jars for breaking each egg searately in case one is not good. then I can separate the yolk if needed. And with the lid I can save the white for future use.

I use a tall jar for my cotton filter for coffee, because it is too long to keep during filtering, and it does not fit in a cup!  

I put each daily milk from the ewe in a different jar, until I get the separation of whey naturally on the counter top.

I have countless jars full of seeds....


When I finish a jar of coconut oil, I "clean" the jar with my morning coffee… Nice taste and less soap for cleaning!
 
pollinator
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I preserve most of my blackberries each year by making cordial.  

I started by using regular quart Mason type jars, but found it's much easier to decant them from the wide-mouth jars, as I smoosh the fruit to get the last bit of volume and flavor.  I have a narrow bottle that fits inside the wide mouth for this task, and then I screw on sprouting lids to act as sieves to pour out into the final decorative and labelled bottles.  I'd been using the metal lid and ring.  But sometimes they leak when shaking the jar to dissolve the requisite sugar in the recipe.  This year I discovered that Ball makes a leak-free BPA-free plastic cover.



I bought Mainstay brand lids by mistake and returned them.  They leak!
I think I'll have much less hassle with this type of lid.  I've had to work hard to remove the two piece style, sometimes having to destroy it in the process.

Last year's crop:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVwjPi6F-17/

(not sure how to bring photos over from Instagram.)

 
pollinator
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When I was looking into the Kratky method of hydroponics using Folger's coffee cans, and trying to decide on which size of net cup to buy, I found a video by a guy on YouTube saying all he uses are the 3" cups because they fit a widemouth mason jar perfectly. So I bought a 3" hole saw for the Folger's lids and ordered a set of these: https://amzn.to/2YgzyoW

I'm not likely to use the mason jars for full-bore hydroponics because I'd have to block the light, and that's extra work, but I can use them to get cuttings started that I can transfer into the opaque Folger's cans, and there are lots of other fermenting exploits I know they'll be good for. I got the white instead of the black net, and I can use them to keep vegetables submerged under brine. I also use these silicone fermenting tops, and they fit well on top of the net cups, leaving enough room to screw the ring on tightly: https://amzn.to/2YgzWUq

 
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I have a ton of mason jars and just recently got some pump cover things so that they can be used to dispense soap, pretty handy. Other than that they get used as water glasses and of course for canning. Some good tips in here for them!
 
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I wanted to  to get away from plastic in travel mugs and got this awhile back.
 It works well, with one caveat: thermal conductivity means that the lid is the same temp as the liquid. So if you try to sip scalding coffee, you burn your lips along with your tongue.
 
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mason jars are awesome for vacuum storage. Install a tire valve on the lid. I use my converted vacuum sealer to vacuum it.
 
Diane Kistner
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julian Gerona wrote:mason jars are awesome for vacuum storage. Install a tire valve on the lid. I use my converted vacuum sealer to vacuum it.



Oh, that reminds me! I really like these: https://amzn.to/2XwQsCC

I have an earlier version of these in both widemouth and regular sizes that work with Foodsaver's now-discontinued wine saver device (a wand with a pointed end). When that dies, I'll have to see if I can't rig something else to do the job...or find a manual sealing pump that I can adapt with the tip to still work.

 
julian Gerona
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If you dont have a vacuum pump you can also boil the jars with its lid tight or simply heat it anywhere. The pressure will ease on the one way valve and vacuum itself upon cooling down
 
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Rather than preserving Foods it might be better to eat seasonally by eating fruit and such during the summer and eating only meat and fat during winter by doing that you could mimic our ancestors natural diet when we came out of the forest into the savannas. When we did this we evolved to be able to eat a keto diet or carnivore diet along with fasting and endurance running for hunting. In More Southern climates it will likely be better to eat fruit and such during winter when everything is green and eat Meats during summer when everything is dry.by eating a seasonal diet you be able to eat as much as you like during the green times and then lose weight during the dry times or cold times. Not to mention the healing effects of the ketogenic diet once you get into ketosis.
 
Xisca Nicolas
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julian Gerona wrote:If you dont have a vacuum pump you can also boil the jars with its lid tight or simply heat it anywhere. The pressure will ease on the one way valve and vacuum itself upon cooling down



Surprising… I doubt it is enough to create a real full vacuum!
And think that you Will not be able to keep raw food as you are with the vacuum pump!
 
Xisca Nicolas
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lol when out of topic can be full topic…

connor burke wrote:Rather than preserving Foods it might be better to eat seasonally by eating fruit and such during the summer and eating only meat and fat during winter by doing that you could mimic our ancestors natural diet when we came out of the forest into the savannas. When we did this we evolved to be able to eat a keto diet or carnivore diet along with fasting and endurance running for hunting. In More Southern climates it will likely be better to eat fruit and such during winter when everything is green and eat Meats during summer when everything is dry.by eating a seasonal diet you be able to eat as much as you like during the green times and then lose weight during the dry times or cold times. Not to mention the healing effects of the ketogenic diet once you get into ketosis.



I agree and not at the same time, because what do you do when you have too much of something in season? Isn't it better to keep it anyway?

I agree that I preserve much less since I live in the subtropics…

And yes the paradox is that we should eat carbs during heat, and fat during cold, and that it is reversed where summer is dry and gives almost no fresh carbs!

Keto is not healing for everybody and some cannot handle it long term, so the interest is indeed to be keto no more than part of the year. Except for people who do not handle carbs, but those people already know how that have to manage… We can become resistant to more than insulin… Sooo… For those who handle carbs, getting a break resets your cortisol receptors, which seems to be useful.
 
connor burke
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"lol when out of topic can be full topic."
Maybe i should repost it as a thing of its own in the food area.

"I agree and not at the same time, because what do you do when you have too much of something in season? Isn't it better to keep it anyway? I agree that I preserve much less since I live in the subtropics"
My solution is to feed the extra to any animal that wants to eat it so that the soil and beastie will gain value from it.
 
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I use these for lacto-fermenting veggies (my son loves to make pickled jalapeño slices):

https://shop.culturesforhealth.com/collections/vegetables/products/complete-mason-jar-fermentation-kit




The coffee grinder and the lemon juicer look really interesting!  I'll have to check those out some more.
 
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