Wj Carroll

pollinator
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since Jun 24, 2017
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Recent posts by Wj Carroll

Welcome, I look forward to this - plan to plant elderberries this year!
8 months ago
I've lifted weights off and on for years and tried a lot of diets.  Paleo will get you lean and hard.  But, you'll hit a plateau without carbs especially if you lift heavy or do high intensity work either in real life or the gym.  I think a varied diet of meat and fish that is raised well and fed a natural diet (or wild harvested), fresh plant food raised naturally and nutrient dense, good carbs and good fats, is the best long term diet.... or, in other words... the typical diet most folks ate for thousands of years before scientists and doctors (who are so notoriously in vibrant and rude good health... right?  Nope!) gave us diets.  Cook your own food and bake your own bread.... grow it yourself or buy from people who do things the right way... avoid processed foods... work hard... don't worry.
8 months ago
I agree with potential toxicity in compromised sites.  As for the other part of your question, it is a long held belief that the most potent herbs grow in harsh environments.  I do not know if this folk wisdom is universally true  But, medicinal herbs and wild edibles growing... for instance... out of a mostly bare stone, windswept mountain outcropping are believed to be most nutrient dense and/or potent. Similar beliefs are held about dense swamps and dark woods and desserts.  Anywhere the plant grows lowly and struggles to survive.  That said, could you grow even more nutrient dense, potent plants in very rich "better than organic' polyculture systems?  I don't know.  It would be well worth experimenting.
8 months ago
Well, I'll say up front that I can't afford anything right now. But, if you can build my dream instrument, in the future... I'll save up for it if it is along the lines of what you've already quoted.  I play jazz and country, and several instruments.  I'm partial to guitar type 4th tunings and tenor/mandolin type 5th tunings.  I also love old Mosberg double neck designs.  My dream instrument is a telecaster style double neck.... 7 string (Van Eps style) guitar neck on the bottom, with a Bigsby style tremolo... and a 5ths tuned, 4 sting tenor neck on top.... tele style lipstick pickups.. for each and something twangy on the guitar bridge.  Obviously, there are a few engineering challenges... looking for a very jazzy tone... Ted Green and Joe Maphis.
8 months ago

Pearl Sutton wrote:

Catherine Windrose wrote:Ah Pearl.  I'm out of apples.  Those remind me of Lewis Grizzard's humor and writings.


I am a fan of Lewis Grizzard, probably why that made me giggle. That and it's questions I'd like to know the answer to. I have persimmon trees and possums, this could be important!!

:D



Surely, you mean The Great Lewis Grizzard, American by Birth, Southern By the Grave of God, and GO Dawgs!
8 months ago

Beth Wilder wrote:

Wj Carroll wrote:BTW, common prickly pear cactus is kind of like bland kiwi... some improved varieties have more flavor.  But, If you torch them to remove the cactus spines, then juice them to remove the seeds and pulp... maybe add a little pomegranate juice.... amazing wine!  Also pretty awesome in sangria with red wine and citrus.  But, also good for just plain eating with some salt or hard cheese.  You can also add sugar and lemon, freeze and make a granita.


We've found incredible variety in the flavors of different prickly pear fruit in our area. One small spherical red-fruited variety tastes very much like a cross between cherries and strawberries! Another large pear-shaped purple variety is more bland, almost a little savory/salty, but cut in half and put in water with a piece of piloncillo sugar and maybe a cinnamon stick and a couple of dried chilis ferments to an incredible "soda" (very low alcohol content) called colonche that relies on wild yeasts. How do you make wine out of them, Wj Carroll? Do you pitch in wine yeast or rely on wild yeasts? The spineless kind seem to have the least flavor but are still refreshing, and anyway we grow those largely for the pads/nopales.

We've foraged wild grapes (Vitis arizonica) near us, but the large volume of seeds in each small berry have something in them that numbs my tongue. Does anyone know what this could be? I don't like them and haven't figured out how to use them. I like juniper berries (especially in combination with spruce tips in a syrup for flavoring beverages). On the list to try to find are raspberries and blackberries in the mountains, elderberries closer to us, and managing to get any ripe mulberries before the birds. If nuts count, I'm focused on collecting Arizona black walnuts when they're green this summer to make nocino again as well as later in the year to eat.

Thanks for the great thread, Steve!



You have a good palate!  Most people don't get the subtleties at all.  Yes, I do use yeast.  
8 months ago
That is something I've been wanting to do for a while... the sap is really quite good with a uniquely wonderful flavor
8 months ago
BTW, common prickly pear cactus is kind of like bland kiwi... some improved varieties have more flavor.  But, If you torch them to remove the cactus spines, then juice them to remove the seeds and pulp... maybe add a little pomegranate juice.... amazing wine!  Also pretty awesome in sangria with red wine and citrus.  But, also good for just plain eating with some salt or hard cheese.  You can also add sugar and lemon, freeze and make a granita.
8 months ago
A kombucha scoby is very similar to a vinegar mother - but seems to be a bit tougher/more aggressive.  It really depends on your environment... but since a scoby has both yeast and acetic acid bacteria, I usually just use the scoby, whether in wine, cider or even fresh juice.  The scoby will not be healthy and vigorous like in tea... but it does seem to work pretty well
8 months ago