Luke Mitchell

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since Feb 04, 2020
Luke likes ...
forest garden urban building
* Sustainable Agriculture
* Food Forestry
* Green Building
* Beekeeping
* Intelligent Manufacture
Wales, UK
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Recent posts by Luke Mitchell

There is no need to cultivate them here - we are lucky enough to be able to find them in superabundance in the late Spring by taking a walk in an older woodland. We pick quite heavily and freeze them as my partner makes amazing scones using them!

We also have Three-cornered Leeks growing in the South-West of the UK, a delicious wild allium. These grow all over the cities and countryside here and are a great, garlic-flavoured alternative to green onions.

I cultivate Babbington's perennial leeks which are similar to a garlic chive and can often be used in place of ramps, out-of-season. I am just starting some Egyptian Walking Onions too which I am looking forward to!

All of our green onions and leeks are cut with a centimetre left by the root (the white end). These are left in a little water on the kitchen windowsill and replanted when the roots grow (for shop-bought) or the green shoot emerges. These can be replanted and will crop several times more, until the Winter. I also cut them from the ground rather than picking.
3 months ago
I've spent some time at a perennial-focused site in Nepal where they have long, hot summers (albeit with the occasional storm towards the end). They grew the following very successfully:

  • Brazilian potato tree, a bitter but delicious perennial eggplant
  • Pea eggplant, a pea-sized green eggplant relative that forms a low, spiny bush covered in fruit. Used in Tamil (South-Indian) curries. Lasts for 3-5 years.
  • Salad eggplant, an albino egg-shaped fruit that could be eaten raw
  • Sorghum
  • Agave, for high-calorie syrup and tequila
  • Seed and grain amaranths


  • HTH
    3 months ago

    Jennie Little wrote:This sounds great! I have grown jer. Artichokes for years, but Haven’t found a recipe we really like. Have any suggestions?

    Thanks!



    I've found the following 2 delicious:

    1) For a delicious, simple soup, par-boil the artichokes and discard the water (which contains all of the windy-molecules!). Fry a onion in a little butter or oil until golden, add the artichokes, top up with veg stock (or even just water) and season well with salt and pepper. If you have some, add a little thyme.

    2) Cover the artichokes in kitchen foil or use a baking tray to roast them, whole, inside a rocket stove, wood burning stove, oven or BBQ. They taste like pre-buttered jacket potatoes!
    3 months ago