Orin Raichart

pollinator
+ Follow
since Nov 25, 2018
Orin likes ...
solar wood heat
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
289
In last 30 days
0
Total given
152
Likes
Total received
1290
Received in last 30 days
1
Total given
825
Given in last 30 days
61
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Pollinator Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Orin Raichart

Land based Material Science

Property based Material Science

Location dependent material Science

Homestead Material Science


but definitely  "XYZ  Material Science"
1 month ago
amusing that you might want to mull over if you haven't already....

....economics ties to the immediate, national, and international surrounding communities..... as a person shoots for either deep roots or ant village, what will be their economic tie to the immediate community?  the economic tie to the national community?   the international community?

without these economic ties, a person is reliant solely upon passive income which has a shelf life or can evaporate suddenly by external conditions....these ties must be real and executable in a pragmatic way....  a person needs atleast three to be able to adjust to sudden changes and seasonal changes.

soooo....what will be your economic ties to the immediate communities surrounding Wheaton Labs?


with this question answered in the form of a hard currency flow, you will not have to plan as much or amass a passive income before arriving: you can plug and play.
1 month ago
yes it is if you have time, a tractor capable of moving logs, an lt40 woodmizer with a hydrolic log roller and automatic thickness options, a chainsaw, and a chain.

if you start at woodmizer's site and then look for woodmizer forums, you find that many people let their logs age for about a year before cutting them into lumber: less moisture means easier to turn on the mill, less shrinkage and possible warping when aged logs are used.

after you cut your 2x6's, nice size walls for insulation, let them dry in a level stack over a summer out of the sun where the  ambient moisture content isn't below ?30%?   ...if they dry in the sun, they will crack......if they dry in really arid conditions, they will crack.

If you don't age your logs and you don't dry your lumber, you'll have sap running all over your building's frame, your lumber will shrink (and if you have logs with different moisture content, this shrinkage will be different for each batch of lumber you make).

I didn't have a hydrolic log roller nor an automatic thickness measurement option and it took up a lot of time ( it is a two person job if you are looking for speed). With those options, it's a one person job at the same production rate.

it took 11 logs of the size you see below to get 77 2x6's   -yeah, I went for quality and didn't use half formed 2x6's. I only dried the lumber long enough to get the 77 pieces; I had sap all over and my true 2x6's shrank to less than true 2x6's (which was still bigger than the lumber you'd buy from a vendor).

you'll need blades for the woodmizer, bar oil, diesel for the mill and tractor, a lubricant for the mill blade (diluted pinesol in my case), and more than one chain for your chainsaw.

you'll need a large working space for scraps, your lumber stack, and your log stack.
1 month ago

D Nikolls wrote:....
And, things are getting done on long term projects managed by long term people; as we've just read, it sounds like a large portion of the hard work done by the first-gen ants is pretty well wasted, for a variety of reasons.

And ya, hopefully a byproduct of a successful boot-stream is a trickle of ants, skilled up and pre-calibrated to withstand the lab/paul environs.. A village needs villagers!



IMO the work done by Evan and Kai is wasn't wasted. A person moving on to that lot will have some perennials already growing on earthworks that really seem to be more green than places without the hugels. Evan's structure, while small and not rodent proof, with a few modifications in the short summer would be a great place to overwinter the first three winters. While I really like the skill that Kai put into his building and his roof water collection, his building is just too small for a Montana winter. Both Evan and Kai wintered outside in tents, so they really did see buildings as just a place to sleep and the outdoors as their living room and kitchen even in winter.

I'm not sure about Jesse's structure. It wasn't solar south oriented (none of the Ant's buildings were, I suspect magnetic south was used instead). I'm also not sure about his earthworks to shed water away from his structure because I've never seen the kind of water run off Kai and Evan saw on Upper Wheaton Labs. The spring I witnessed didn't even have the creek flowing a little through Ant Village; I suspect the clear cut forest above Wheaton Labs had something to do with that.
2 months ago

D Nikolls wrote:
...Neat to hear about how things have aged. The village seemed like it was off to a great start when I saw it in 2015, but man, community is hard.. getting set up fast enough to overwinter is hard... and the assorted Paul Rules definitely add to the challenge!

If I remember correctly, one of the previous ants had hand-drilled a well; what became of this?

Good luck!



The assorted rules from Paul are about creating a place of environmental purity; since the current mainstream culture uses toxic materials and crazy high energy manufacturing materials like concrete to build with, yes, those rules require a person to be clever to address the needs the lack of those toxic materials present. For those who see no harm in poison building materials, it really goes against the grain not to be able to use plywood for those people with that mind set. Many of the previous inhabitants of Ant Village were clever enough to build within those purity guidelines; the person who built Hilly Billy Mansion failed to, in spite of being capable of doing slip straw. There are other rules too about community which I have no intent of discussing with the general public. Obviously, I like Paul's general view of community otherwise I wouldn't have put four months of work in the Boot Camp in.

There are two hand drilled wells on Upper Wheaton Labs. The most successful one was modded which caused issues by a person who is no longer here. Fred, Josiah, and Jen were looking to get a bit of water out of that one but haven't gotten it working yet (more of a lack of funds than a lack of knowing what to do). This well, if working, is much too far from On Narrow Pond. This well seems to provide a gallon or two per hour. Notice I typed "per hour" and not per minute.

The second one doesn't work at all; there seems to be a plug down the water pipe or clay/silt has plugged it up.  When it did work, it only provided a gallon or maybe two for every quart that was used to prime it. Given the second well can only give about a gallon or so when it did work, it is only good for drinking water (assuming the water was drinking quality) for one person really. Notice I typed "per quart" and not per hour. It could be the water table has dropped below the second well's depth.



2 months ago
Glad you made it!  Hope your cat integrated okay.... awesome you're doing a  Boot Camp Thread!
2 months ago

Ben Skiba wrote:Thanks for the reply Orin.I pmed you some history.Mainly a lightening god that once lived there haha.I don't wanna take away from your blog.Dwarfs redoubt awesome name.Any plans for the wofati by lemontree site?



Nothing taken away Ben. I've watched all the videos I could find including on Jesse's youtube channel so I could understand the past in order to find a path in to the future. The amount of heart and work that went into some of the structures, the wildness of the place and the following loss was something I wanted to understand....and build a bridge into whatever comes next.

Naw, the Dwarf's Redoubt is a narly awkward name, picked to reflect the fact there is no solar gain, difficult in its placement with regards to flooding, and yet that I still want to save the pit portion to preserve the internal feel of the old structure ....maybe I will rock the entire thing in (nubian vault comes to mind). On the other hand, On Narrow Pond, has more than one meaning and reflects the person who hopes to shape it :)

I understand the shortness of the building season and the race too which pushed people to build with less regard to long term viability than to immediacy.... my critique of the shelters is biased by my own shelter, water, fire and food goals, and certainly not about the  people who built them nor the events which ushered out their era on the Upper Wheaton Labs.

Had the lighting god gotten lighting perhaps On Narrow Pond would never exist!  Where the Bear Den once stood, there will either be a cool tribute to the first group living in Ant Village or a mere clay water basin good for catching rain and directing it to a narrow pond -time always tells the story.

The Lemon Tree site is being worked by Clayton now. He is having to replace the six main poles holding up the roof; not an easy task to say the least!
2 months ago

Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:Orin, I have a question.
You are in Ant Village now. I used to follow the Ants before, who were busy building some nice little houses there. But all of them left and didn't return. How many Ants are there living in Ant Village now? What happened to the houses the others made?



There are three Deep Roots people on Upper Wheaton Labs right now. Paul is really encouraging Boots to transition to the Deep Roots program rather than the Ant Village Program; I believe he is trying new methods since the first Ant Village experiment resulted in many Ants leaving. In the USA, living in community isn't easy for those of us not born into the Amish or Hutterrite traditions. Since I am interested in creating a functioning example of shelter, water, fire and food before I experiment, I've chosen the Ant Village program where in I have time....when I want to contribute to the community, I can. The Deep Roots people have much less time to create their own shelter, water, fire and food systems. Because I feel the Ant Village program makes the most sense for me an others like me, I invite new Boots to seriously consider the Ant Program. I've failed in this endeavor; I am the only Ant besides Jaqi. Clayton has chosen the Deep Roots program, and is working on the Lemon Tree site as his acre should he complete two years in the Boot Camp.

So that makes six people actively engaged in Upper Wheaton Labs currently.

As to the houses other Ants made, the first lot is rented and managed by a woman whom I've never seen nor met since she does this remotely. Clayton almost chose Lot 2 upon which Evan and Kai built and lived. Both of these buildings exist but were never really completed...except for maybe Kai's.  I say never finished because, when I consider a shelter I ask: where is the kitchen?, where is the rocket stove?, where is the shower?, where is the humanure repository? where is the bed? So Kai has a bed, has a kitchen stove but no sink, no rocket stove, no shitter,  and no shower. Kai did do something I really liked: he collected water off his natural roof! -he was the only one with who attempted this. Evan used to have a rocket stove and Walker stove but he took it with him, but no sink, and his shower/shitter wasn't finished. I think, don't know, Evan's bed was the bench of his rocket stove. I like the fact that Evan's place is the best thermal performer in the summer (keeps it cooler than all the other buildings). Lot 3 and 5 have nothing left worth discussing. Lot 5, Jesse's acre has a shelter which Jaqi chose. And there is lot 6, now named On Narrow Pond, which I've claimed. There are two buildings which have major issues requiring that I rebuild them or tear them down. There is also Hill Billy Mansion which was built with banned building materials; I've agreed to demolish Hll Billy Mansion for any allowed building materials I can reclaim AND to take the banned materials to the dump.

I feel that Ant Village has a chance of success once one person actually creates the scared four: shelter, water, fire, and food. Without a full example of the scared four on the land, I feel few with realize what an opportunity this really is.

2 months ago

Ben Skiba wrote:....I like the rock cistern idea pretty sweet getting a Nabataean feel to it.Narrow ponds reminds me of EarthSea books.....


I knew the only way I personally could bring water to my acre is to store it from rain; rocking in clay walls seemed the natural answer. Since the Upper Labs are a glacial rain forest in the winter (complete with misting freezing rains), and a high desert in the summer, narrow ponds, whose depth are greater than their diameter, seemed like the answer for hot weather evaporation in the summer and collection during the winter.  


Ben Skiba wrote:Keep it up brother lookin good.You got any pictures of old structures?how has bearcave aged?



The logs and small poles used for the walls/ceiling were not barked and as a result now are full of white fungi which are rapidly breaking the poles down.  Additionally, many of the poles and logs were not long enough to meet at the center or the roof line; this means at some point in the future, when the tarps degrade (which they will due to not having dirt or brush cover at the top 3rd of the roof), the roof will have holes in it in many places.

The clay sides are now caving in near the cut in seats and cut roots due to water.

My solution to this is to remove all the brush, remove the tarps, cut new poles of the correct length. remove the bark, and replace the too short and too rotten poles.

Since I will basically re-design and replace most of the building (I suspect only the clay floor and mid thigh clay walls will remain), I'll rename the new building the Dwarf's Redoubt. I use this name because the site has no solar gain unless I remove many trees.... I might redo it in rock entirely to prevent the clay from caving in. It won't be my living space; I have ideas and plans but I'll wait to see how the place evolves.

I don't share pictures of what I do on Narrow Pond to the general public; those who provide material support get that kind of information.

I see you are near or on Dine land. I love the southwest in a way not easily explained. I hope your own scared four are well established or on the way to being so!
2 months ago