gift
3D Plans - Pebble Style Rocket Mass Heater
will be released to subscribers in: soon!

Denise Cares

+ Follow
since Oct 12, 2018
Denise likes ...
books food preservation wood heat
Merit badge: bb list bbv list
For More
USDA Zone 7a
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
25
In last 30 days
2
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
439
Received in last 30 days
17
Total given
101
Given in last 30 days
7
Forums and Threads

Recent posts by Denise Cares

Abraham Palma wrote:Hi.
A couple(*) of questions.


Also, this bundle is streaming only, with a pdf guide. It is much cheaper than the streaming only option without the guide, how comes?

If I want to save the course in a hard disk to peruse, then I must purchase the downloadable option, but it doesn't come with the guide.

Finally, is there a post where all the options to purchase this course are listed? If so, could you provide links to it please?



Reply to first question: Perhaps Abraham because the bundle is a promotion to encourage us to get as much education as we can? Why not go that route?  
Second question: The trade off is that you don't get to make a hard copy of it. We know that being constrained to on-line access/use has serious drawbacks but we are taking the risk in some sense putting our faith in the powers that be who are the current rulers of the world. Maybe getting free from that noose is worth the extra price?
Third question: I haven't found that on one webpage yet, but just got the email with all of the separate pages listed.  Here they are:  
Here is the "newly remodeled" Garden Master Guide ebook. This companion to Helen Atthowe's Garden Master Course is ready to download!

https://permies.com/s/gmg-ebook

Would you prefer the Garden Master Course Bundle? Voila!

https://permies.com/s/gmc-bundle

Or would you rather the Garden Master Course as a Tiny Download?

https://permies.com/s/gmc-tiny

On the other hand, we do have the Garden Master Course as an HD Download! We aim to please!

https://permies.com/s/gmc-hd

Hope this helps!
P.S. I think that whatever option you choose, would make a terrific gift for your friend! How nice of you to share!
2 weeks ago
I have to share. Today I was visiting a thrift store  and met a man who was shopping there holding a couple of hangers with some narrow cloth with a scalloped-edge and botanical designs. I asked him what they were. He said "runners" and he was going to transform them into "shorts" for himself for summer gardening/yardwork! As we examined the cloth together he noted it was nice sturdy fabric and the price of that quality of fabric was more reasonable at the thrift store than at the retail store in town. He had studied pattern making at a well-known design school in the Bay area years ago (so pardon me I cannot recall the name of the school!!). He has two sewing machines and does upholstery also. we had a delightful lively conversation and of course I shared about my Permies friends who are also making clothing and patterns! What a fun afternoon!
2 weeks ago

Jd Gonzalez wrote:



http://www.paisleypincushion.com/product/buckle-jumper-pattern/

As a child from the early seventies reading your quest reminded me of coveralls turned into skirts. I had a very handy ex who used make them.


I know this is an old thread, but hoping someone knows why when I clicked the pattern link it changes to ww5.paisleypincushion.com and shows a white blank page. Tried several times to re-copy and paste still does the same thing. Maybe that means they're not in business now?  Any alternative patterns you know of?
2 weeks ago

Devora Go wrote:I was blessed to win this drawing!
Congratulations Devora! Enjoy watching your plants and trees grow and eating and sharing the fruits.  

3 weeks ago
I liked your idea and video so I bought a sewing bird and clamped it to my sewing machine cover so it is close by. It makes me sew happy!  Very handy for holding items so I can mend without my hand aching. Thank you R Ranson for sharing this info.
3 weeks ago
Has anyone tried just raking chips onto a heavy canvas or tarp and dragging it to where needed? Of course I wouldn't overfill the tarp or go very far with it on really rough ground. It might save the back from the lifting, twisting motions of using shovel/fork.
1 month ago

Johanna Breijer wrote:Hi
I have been under the dome(AKA the giant magnifying glass that helped put everything on fire.)  My thornless blackberries are doing fine, but blackberries with thorns have been acting as one of my canaries in the heat.  By noon it's wilting from the sunshine.  I have placed shade cloth over them.  It helps but it's not a perfect solution.  It has been quite happy in the smoke.  The brown horizon and blood red sun seems to agree with the berry bushes.  I've been thinking of moving the bushes to a shady location of my yard.  I would prefer them there.  I'm allergic to sunlight.  Is it a good idea to move them to the shade or am I setting myself up for a different set of problems?
My raspberries have made bumper crops this year.  The ring the neighbor's doorbell and run away is a good way to get rid off the excess berries.  Food bank will not take them.  Neither will meals on wheels.  I have preserved  two years worth in the freezer and dried a bunch.  I use metal fencing to keep them confined.  There are raspberry suckers popping up twenty feet away.  They have invaded the hedge and I have left them there to keep out the wildlife and people.  I pull the suckers when they first appear.  I have left a few for neighbors who want raspberry bushes.
My blackberries are only 2 years old.  The thornless are producing berries this year.  The other blackberries haven't bloomed yet.
     



Good grief - who doesn't like raspberries??  Unbelievable that the food bank and Meals for seniors won't take them!!  You are welcome to ring my doorbell with baskets any time - but please don't run away!!  I'd love to be your neighbor  What is the dome you are under?  (Sorry I don't get the analogy of the magnifying glass).  What area of the world do you live in? I'm in northern california - and there's been a lot of fires in the west USA in recent years.
1 month ago

Alan Burnett wrote:This may be anecdotal, but I have some asparagus growing amongst the raspberry canes that seem to do well. Raspberry leaves aren't dense in the spring when Asparagus gets harvested, and when summer hits and the raspberries bear their fruit, the asparagus can grow out and cast some shade, keeping grass from growing amongst the canes. Has anyone tried this combination?



That is an interesting idea. Are they listed anywhere you know of as companion plants?  Which one should be planted first?  I'm thinking the asparagus since they need to go in deep about 6-12 inches with a center mound for the crown.  Then the dirt is filled into the hole as the crown gets established/grows.  After the soil reaches almost ground level then the raspberries can go in as their roots can be more shallow. Is that correct?
Don't asparagus roots spread?  Won't asparagus compete for space/nutrients with the raspberries which do spread and move outward every year?  I'm trying to contain my raspberry patch and planted them in raised boxes. Formerly they were planted in the ground and filled up the walkways and were a big bramble mess hard to harvest.  I had the rows only about 24 inches apart.  So, I want to see if they would stay happy in a confined space. This is the 3rd year since planting them in the box.  I just planted some asparagus in the ground, sort of in a confined space as one side is raised off the ground/drops off and is bordered by metal/concrete and fencing and the other side ends at a rock covered pathway/hardpan.

I think also the raspberries like an acid soil.  Is this also true for asparagus?
Very curious to know how yours get along by the 2nd and 3rd year when asparagus harvest expected to increase.  

1 month ago

Andie Carter wrote:

Denise Cares wrote:Jen, here's some good information here   https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-grow-sorrel-4121351  with just what you need to know for dividing your plant. I would love to have some in my yard. How near are you to Grass Valley?  



That's an article talking about a very different sorrel, Oxalis vs this garden sorrel, which is in the Rumex genus. Very different growth habit, not related at all, though they do both taste sour due to the oxalic acid in them.



Andie, don't ask me how it happens that when one clicks on the link I posted above it opens to a very different page about "How to Get Rid of Wood Sorrel" which is an invasive grass with a small yellow flower!  That is NOT what I linked to. Even the web page url//and number of the article are different. I can't figure out or explain how it can cross-over by just clicking on the link! Very strange electronic voodoo...dooodoo..doodoo!! :)  Try to copy and paste the link in a new window and see if it works correctly.
1 month ago