Denise Cares

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since Oct 12, 2018
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books food preservation wood heat
USDA Zone 7a
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Recent posts by Denise Cares

I can only see one picture showing the roof and 1 missing panel.  The polycarbonate panels are better insulating than plastic by far.  If they are intact i would leave them in place.  You do need to cut the tree above the structure to prevent all the debris from collecting on the roof and clogging channels an creating moss and gunk.  Your vents are offset, but that's probably the best they can fit due to the wood they were attached to and the way they were set in place.  Unless you want to rebuild the whole roof, I'd just try to seal around them to close the gap on the 3 sides and prevent heat from escaping in winter.  You could replace the missing panel with plastic if there's a way to attach it to a frame (maybe stapled to a wood surround.  Otherwise if you could pick up a polycarb panel just drop that in place.  Not sure why your panels "fly out of place" unless you haven't fastened them down properly with wire clips or with screws.  Not sure what the broken 1X2 wooden rail is on top of the panels.  Maybe to hold them from flying off?  Having anything on top is going to impede cleaning off the roof and letting snow slide off.  Hope you get it repaired to be functional again.  It's a nice sized space with lots of potential.
2 weeks ago
One more plant with "heart" - a calla lilly speckled leaf variety
1 month ago
Anne, I love your morning glory!  Did someone mentioned catalpa?  Here's a picture of mine in bloom, but the leaves are a bit short of heart-shaped.  This other flowering lovely does have heart-y leaves tho.  Does anyone know the name of it?
1 month ago
Garlic is great for balancing gut microbiome.  Thanks for all the tips on how to grow and prepare it.  
2 months ago
To answer the first question of what is a reliable source to know how a drug is metabolized you simply have to look up the drug in a PDR (Physician's Desk Reference).  This is a gigantic book available for purchase at a hefty price or check on-line at www.pdr.net.  E-mail for info to: < customer.service@medec.com>.  You might also check at the local library or a medical library if you live near one.  Many doctor's offices, clinics, and all pharmacies and hospitals have them for use by the staff in various departments. In this reference book you'll find info on pharmacokinetics, metabolism, elimination of drug and route of elimination, half life and other detailed info about drug interactions, uses, warnings, etc.  There are also PDR's for other things like Nutritional Supplements, Herbal Medicines and Nonprescription Drugs.  You might even ask a medical professional or library if they would give you their old/retired copy when they update to a new edition.  
3 months ago
Mike Peters, that was a very helpful load of information you posted!  Thank you.  I'm going to look for a 10 tine fork. I have a wide wheelbarrow which is much better with balance as the narrow contractor style one tips over so easily.  Perhaps, tho it is easier to pour chips out of? Any suggestions for keeping the wheelbarrow steady while on its side and scooping chips into it?  I'll be working by myself and so it's hard to lift it back up and keep from spilling the load. Any suggestions on doing that?  I've also got to move the chips quite a distance, so have loaded them by shoveling into the back of my pickup, driving to the unloading spot and scooping/shoveling chips out into the wheelbarrow sitting just under the open tailgate.  Then I can wheelbarrow into the narrow spaces.  It's quite an ordeal tho.  With a second person it goes easier working in tandem with 2 wheelbarrows - one person stays on the truck standing on the chips to scoop into the first wheelbarrow and the other person does relay runs with the filled wheelbarrow, then returns and leaves the empty one. Hope that makes sense.  As for spreading out the chips or raking them - there is a nice rake that a landscaper told me about, called The Grounds KeeperII.  It's got a long metal tine head (replaceable tines if they ever break) which are flexible and work nicely for chips.  Runs about $30 and see if your local hardware store will carry them, otherwise available direct from company on internet plus shipping.  It also works good for general purpose raking.
4 months ago
Great post.  Very nice transformations going on here!  Question for George Y: how did you make the arches for mom's berry bushes?  They are so tall.  Would have to be sturdy.  What metal/wire was used?  I need some sort of arch for my clematis vine.  It was trailing all over the ground and I tied it up temporarily onto a metal railing that's about to topple over.  Want a simple yet sturdy idea that doesn't require too much skill (as have to put it up myself) and that looks "natural" in a woodsy setting.  
4 months ago
These are the sweetest little jars ever!  I can think of lots of little things to store in them.  Useful in every room of the house.  The wood is beautiful too!  It seems you can make the lids sit on the inside or outside but not sure how that's done.  How about making a heavy, solid rolling pin with turned handles?
4 months ago
Just adding my 2 cents here...I have had sunchokes volunteer themselves in my yard and come back year after year.  Last year I thought I'd be done with them and dug down with a spade fork to remove every last knob I could find.  Most of them were smallish radish sized as I had not bothered to water them and the soil  is rather poor.  Well, this spring several plants came up and had actually spread out to where I had disturbed and tossed the soil while digging and combing thru it by hand was not done too carefully.  Well, they grew to 6 ft tall, some of them flowered and all are still green (yes, good biomas).  I may dig them again this year just to see how big they got.  In past years have also left them in the ground to overwinter and they keep quite well even after cold snowy weather. The rains actually make the tubers swell in size. I'm in zone 7a.  I think even shriveled up tubers and parts of tubers will grow once the soil is moist enough for them.  They are almost indestructible and even if you don't like to eat them they do make a pretty tall plant like a mini sunflower which is useful for shading or privacy along a fence or just to enjoy the bright yellow flowers.  Just remember if you disturb the soil around where they are they will move to where you tossed the soil.  Apparently even teeny tiny tubers and broken bits are survivalists!
5 months ago
Well Anne, the simple answer is yes.  Here's two links for more specific instructions.  Good luck.  https://www.culturedfoodlife.com/can-you-reuse-the-brine-for-cultured-vegetables/    and    https://www.wellpreserved.ca/fundamentals-fermentation-can-re-use-brine/
5 months ago