Brody Ekberg

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since Aug 02, 2018
Not long ago, I had a revelation type experience in which I completely fell in Love with Life itself. This made me realize that I want to spend the rest of my Life sustaining the opportunity for others to have the same experience. I had a vision of an Eden like scene with my wife and I at the center, surrounded by sustainably grown, fresh organic food that we were growing and giving away for free, teaching the community and specifically local children what we are to do with this Life and how. I am now consciously involved with the Life long process of bringing this idealistic dream into reality
Iron River MI
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Recent posts by Brody Ekberg

Trace Oswald wrote:You could put a little DE on it just in case.  It can't do any harm.  Just don't put enough to make a cloud that she could breathe in.



I only have Safer brand DE for pest control and I don’t think its food grade. But I’m going to try to find some asap and add some to their dust bath and the coop floor in general
1 day ago
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.thefeatherbrain.com/blog/toxic-chicken-coop-pine-shavings%3fformat=amp

Above is a link to a detailed article I just read about how toxic pine shavings are and how we should not use them as bedding. I’ve researched so many bedding options (we’re new to chickens and I tend to overthink things) and it seems that pine shavings are #1 choice for the majority of people, for many reasons. I know nothing is perfect and everything has a “downside”, but with that in mind, do you all feel this is being blown out of proportion, or should we really stop using pine? I want something that most importantly works for the chickens, but is also cheap/free and sustainable and compostable.

I have an abundance of red pines at home and access to shedded paper. I’m considering mixing pine shavings, shredded paper, dry pine needles, dry leaves and maybe straw so that there is diversity in the bedding materials.

Any thoughts or opinions? I’d love to hear them!
1 day ago

Amy Arnett wrote:If she's not exhibiting other symptoms, I would guess it's just an injury. Maybe from getting her beak caught in a small opening or on a wire or something.

If she starts shaking her head and/or rubbing her beak excessively, it could be mites.

There is a discussion on backyard chickens about a similar looking beak.
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/injury-to-base-of-beak-possible-trauma-or-frostbite-no-big-deal.281489/

They talk about the possibility of mites, fungus, frostbite in high humidity, and dryness as other possible causes.



I have 1/2” hardware “cloth” (wire fencing) in several spots on the coop, and I thought maybe she was pecking through it and damaged her beak that way. I just don’t know why she would be the only one and what to do abut it.

I dont know what mite damage looks like, but also wonder why she would be the only one. Could be though, since I think dust baths are their counter to mites and we have a dust bath dilemma! It’s a frozen chunk of mud right now so I need to thaw it and put the contents into something with drainage holes. And then put it under the coop to stay dry.

We’ve had one night around 19 degrees, but I think the coop should have good ventilation so I hope it isn’t frostbite.

I’ll check out the link you provided. Thanks for the help!
1 day ago
Hello everyone!

We’re new to raising chickens and have 7 buff orpingtons that are about 10 weeks old now. I recently noticed one of them has a dark gap or something going on near her nostrils. She otherwise seems healthy and none of the others have this. I looked inside her beak and found nothing unusual in there, just on the outside. Any ideas what this could be and what to do about it? It almost seems like it could be a bacteria or fungus, or maybe just a beak injury of sorts.

More details:

Since day one, we seem to always have 1 girl with issues. We named her Struggles. It started with pasty butt. Then from that, she was a little smaller than the rest (still held her own with the rest though). Then one got pecked in the neck and was bleeding. Then one had a dark colored bump on her beak (possibly the same bird. We can’t actually tell them apart except for one that we think may be a rooster). I tried to scratch off the bump but it seemed attached, so I left it. Now I cant find the bump on any beaks, but one has this new issue. I’m wondering if it’s Struggles struggling away this whole time. Maybe she’s got an issue inside that hasn’t been taken care of and is affecting her differently as time progresses?

Any advice is appreciated! Hoping this isnt an issue that progresses or spreads to the others.

Thank you
-Brody

1 day ago
I’m trying to revive this post a bit. None of the roses rooted, but I planted them anyway. Rabbits and deer ate them all, so I dont know if they’re were doing alright or not. Some of the grapes rooted, but most died within a year or being planted. The ones i kept probably had a lack of sunlight. Who knows with the ones I gave away.

So, I’m trying again! I’ve got a few grape vine hardwood cuttings in my entryway now hoping they will root. I’m considering taking more rose cuttings and possibly gooseberries and elderberries as well.

My question is, can all deciduous shrubs, like those listed, be basically treated the same for doing hardwood cuttings? And I’m also unsure whether to leave stuff outside throughout our winter, or shelter them in a cold entryway or garage instead? Also, do I keep the rooting medium moist and do I put a bag over the tops or leave them exposed?

Any advice is appreciated!

Thanks
-Brody
1 week ago
Thank you all for the input! I ended up cutting the plant into 3 sections: top, bare stem and roots. I repotted them all separately in hopes of turning 1 leggy, twisted aloe into 3 healthy aloes.
1 week ago

Morfydd St. Clair wrote:

Brody Ekberg wrote:I just chopper chicory root, dehydrated it, then roasted it until it smelled like hot fresh chocolate brownies. It has me seriously considering using roasted chicory root as a local, perennial, native, sustainable cocoa substitute! I cant find anything online about people doing this, but I cant imagine why not. This could be a really great thing since everyone loves chocolate, but we over consume it and most of us really have no business eating cocoa anyway since it is far from local for us. Chicory chocolate could be a future business idea!



Ok, but does it taste like chocolate as well as smell like it?  Because I'd be really disappointed to smell all the goodness and then have it be bland and/or bitter.



I guess I should have said cocoa substitute and not chocolate substitute. Cocoa is bitter and a little bland. Thats why we add sugar and fat to make it chocolate. I think it needs more experimentation but that there is potential. I doubt it will taste exactly the same as cocoa, but it might be close!
1 week ago
So, I love chocolate. Specifically dark (like 75-90%) chocolate. But I also have read that cocoa will be endangered soon if civilization’s chocolate consumption continues as it has. I also have been trying to eat locally and sustainably, and for someone living in upper Michigan, chocolate doesn’t fit that bill at all.

But, I just roasted some chicory root to use for tea this winter and my wife and I both agree that it smells almost exactly like chocolate. Just fantastic, like warm chocolate brownies fresh out of the oven. I know chicory has some bitterness, but so does cocoa. I know using roasted chicory root as a drink has been quite popular for a long time but can’t find any information about using it as a cocoa substitute. Aside from sometimes being difficult to mill into a fine powder, I see no reason this cant be done. It would be perennial, local, native and sustainable. The entire plant is edible, bees love it and it looks beautiful in flower.

I may have a business idea brewing... haha

Does anyone have any information on if this is being done or, if not, why not? I cant be the first person to think of this!
2 weeks ago
I just chopper chicory root, dehydrated it, then roasted it until it smelled like hot fresh chocolate brownies. It has me seriously considering using roasted chicory root as a local, perennial, native, sustainable cocoa substitute! I cant find anything online about people doing this, but I cant imagine why not. This could be a really great thing since everyone loves chocolate, but we over consume it and most of us really have no business eating cocoa anyway since it is far from local for us. Chicory chocolate could be a future business idea!
2 weeks ago
I see this is an older post, but I’ll try to liven it up a bit. I love chocolate, specifically dark (like 75-90%) chocolate. But I also have read that cocoa will be endangered soon if civilization’s chocolate consumption continues as it has. I also have been trying to eat locally and sustainably, and for someone living in upper Michigan, chocolate doesn’t fit that bill at all.

But, I just roasted some chicory root to use for tea this winter and my wife and I both agree that it smells almost exactly like chocolate. Just fantastic, like warm chocolate brownies fresh out of the oven. I know chicory has some bitterness, but so does cocoa. I know using roasted chicory root as a drink has been quite popular for a long time but can’t find any information about using it as a cocoa substitute. Aside from sometimes being difficult to mill into a fine powder, I see no reason this cant be done. It would be perennial, local, native and sustainable. The entire plant is edible, bees love it and it looks beautiful in flower.

I may have a business idea brewing... haha
2 weeks ago