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Sonja Draven

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since Jun 23, 2018
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Recent posts by Sonja Draven

Thank you both! I was hoping the answer was yes and I'm so happy it was.

Too much wood to get it all moved and split this year  but I'll keep doing what I can. And I have enough dry wood already for this coming winter so this can all dry a full year after it's split.
1 month ago
I cut a bunch of trees about eighteen months ago related to a house build and department of sad compliance. They were cut into rounds and then piled. I've had many projects during that time and there was way too much wood to get to last dry season.

I've been slowly working my way through splitting the piles but nature has started doing her thing and some of the wood started growing mycellium. My question is, is it still healthy / safe to burn (for me and my stove). It's not rotten all the way through, just growing on the outside. I've planned to split and store it in the shed where it will be able to dry over a couple years but if I need to pass on these, I'll pull them out and use them for something else.
1 month ago

Denise Cares wrote:Wow, Sonja very impressive! You did a great job and it looks very nice! You've inspired me to try putting up something to cover my woodpile. What did you use to cover the roof?  How does it hold up to rain or snow?  I get heavy snow here, even 2 or more feet. I have pallets that I could use as some suggested.


Thanks, Denise! I found all the suggestions here very helpful and learned a lot through the whole process. I ended up doing the roof twice because the first time didn't work super well. I put up rafters but misjudged how much water would collect on it without a fully flat surface for easy runoff and a drastic enough slant. So I increased the slant and switched to SunTuf sheets because it was the middle of the rainy season and I really didn't have time to experiment again.

I think you'll want a serious slant on yours (and you might still need to help it slide off your roof if it builds up too much). The biggest things I have found with all my projects and especially this one, is to give yourself grace to have it take longer than you expected as well as to make mistakes and have rework. Every project you'll learn things from doing that you'll be able to incorporate in projects for the rest of your life. Also do it yourself when you can (if you want that), and ask for help when you need it.

You can do it!
2 months ago

Beau Davidson wrote:

Mike Haasl wrote:Changing cardboard to paper would save 4 characters...



Thought about that . . .

Think I have it sorted by swapping "others" for "others call it", see above.



Fresher brain or something this morning, and IF you want one more tweak, you could make it less passive and say:

Call it "carbon neutral" or "carbon negative" but reduce global problems and heat your home with yard waste and cardboard!
4 months ago
The intro text ends in the middle of a sentence:
"Heat your home with yard waste and cardboard while reducing global"
4 months ago
I feel your pain! I have a set of silicone spatulas similar to these

https://www.amazon.com/Silicone-Flexible-Resistant-Non-scratch-Stainless/dp/B07V348CFP/ref=mp_s_a_1_11?keywords=silicone+spatula&qid=1651329506&sr=8-11

I use the very smallest ones as much as I can. It works pretty well on the bottom and sides of the jar. I admit that I then use my own finger to remove the last of the corners at the top shoulders! It's either a clean finger or the food is going on my plate anyway.
4 months ago
Thank you all for your great responses! I feel very encouraged. :)

Unfortunately, right at this moment, I still have a lot of unknowns with how the roof downspouts will drain and exactly where / how the fire vehicle turnaround will look (required by code where I live) and those things will affect where I can put even things like containers and whether a true kitchen garden is feasible. It sounds so lovely though!

However, I've been keeping all your suggestions in mind as I look at what I have and where I think things will be and I have a tentative short term first year plan.
6 months ago

kevin brooks wrote:greetings miss or mrs. draven,
appreciate your caring thoughtful questions. i sent you a moose-age.
sincerely, kevin


I didn't receive your moosage. Please post the info here anyway so anyone interested after reading it can followup with you.
6 months ago

kevin brooks wrote:greetings, family of eight !
i research into farms to connect with them for organic farm products. i know of a few that host woofers,
"the more the merrier" in their eyes. they're more in the stream of social focus, music evenings,
some handicapped, most just bruised souls looking for healing...
let me know if you are still looking.... truly, kevin  
gad@saphar.net
gad [at] saphar [dot] net



Hi Kevin, I noticed you've posted in a few community threads about the communities you're familiar with.

For those who are interested but not comfortable emailing you, can you answer these questions:

Are these various communities you've mentioned associated with each other?

If not, how do you find out about them, and/or how are you associated?

What are the rules to live there? How are those rules enforced or changed?

What does leadership look like?

How do members support themselves and/or the group? How does the community sustain itself?
6 months ago
Justin - welcome back to permies and thanks for your book giveaway

This question is for you (or anyone so this is perennial),

I've been on my site a few years but am just now finishing my house build. Changes had to be made to the site to accommodate the build including removing a couple trees, thinning others and similar. While I know overall sun and wind patterns, I also know that I've made changes that will affect those things along with water flow, where heat and cool collects and I need to figure the new patterns out.

I know best practice is to observe and chart things for a year first. Then make big plans and add design features before adding gardens and things. I know that is logical but I also desperately want to plant some veggies this year. How do I balance the longer term rational planning and omg, I need veggies now? Is there a way to have a quick win that I hopefully won't have to completely redo next year?
6 months ago