Scott McBride

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since Mar 22, 2015
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hugelkultur trees composting toilet
Elevation: 712ft
USDA Zone 8
Average rainfall: 47 inches
20 acres ~ 15 temperate rain forest ~ 5 pasture, yard, garden, and house
Foothills of Cascade Mountains, Snohomish County, WA
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Recent posts by Scott McBride

I'm with Julie ~ in addition to all of these great tools (I'm a big fan of our scythe also), our broad fork is likely the most labor saving device that we have that is not a machine. Want to cultivate some pre-season garden beds down deep? This monster is the tool! https://www.easydigging.com/broadfork.html
2 months ago
Greetings ~ In a quick search of permies.com, this is the only post addressing this subject. Thanks! Other than the replies here, have you discovered any more connections between recognizing patterns and applying them in design? I am struggling with this subject also. Thanks!

P.S. I'll be making my own post along these lines shortly.
11 months ago
Hi Jocylen ~ Thanks for the links. They have good information in them. I don't know whether combining posts or inter-linking the posts would be more useful.

LightFoot
3 years ago
Greetings again ~ I am wondering if growing rice in Cascadia Zone 8 is possible and practical. I saw a presentation by Dave Boehnlein in which I learned that in modern japan, many families are growing enough rice for a whole year. Is anybody here growing rice? Is it worth the effort? What rice varieties work well here? What sources sell rice seed?

Thank you!
3 years ago
Greetings Cascadia ~ Is anyone growing bamboo here in Cascadia? I am interested in doing so and would like to hear from some people who are. Bamboo seems like a good renewable crop with some other benefits. I've also read about the hazards. I've read that "hardy" bamboo could work up here but the hardy bamboos are runners rather than clumping bamboos. I have a large pasture in which to plant bamboo and I've read about planting the bamboo in a buried container to contain them. SO, anyway, wanting to hear success or failure stories and your recommendations before I jump into this. Thank you!
3 years ago
All of this is certainly true. May I offer an additional thought: my greatest success at controlling non-native blackberry is to get the whole plant out by the root. From now through the end of rainy season, I work to get to the base of a plant and pull it out. Usually, a decent pair of leather gloves is all I need because the plant's thorns get smaller and more fragile at the base. If I cannot pull out the whole plant, my favorite tool to get the root out is a pulaski. Unless you have goats to keep the plants chewed down, getting the plant out by the roots is the only way to get ahead in the blackberry wars IMHO.
3 years ago
Greetings! We are almost three years into our cob sauna project. All is going well. Initial plastering under way. I am trying to educate myself to do the cob floor for the hot room. This seems a bit more daunting than the changing room floor. First, the hot room floor must slope from all points to the drain. Second, I am concerned about how to finish the hot room floor. Will the usual linseed oil, thinner, and wax be enough for a room that will be periodically very wet? Does anyone have experience or opinions with using cob to floor a sauna hot room?
4 years ago
cob
Good Morning ~ I like your idea so I'll give it a go. Hey, I am working hard to be a Cascadian Permaculturist, and here's our our website: http://www.coppermoonie.com/ ; and our FB page: https://www.facebook.com/CoppermoonARC/?fref=ts
4 years ago
Great post ~ thanks for doing this work. Forest garden is one of my main focuses for our property (20 acres, 45 miles NE of Seattle).
4 years ago