Peter George

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since Jan 12, 2015
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forest garden trees chicken
Living with family rurally off-grid in an earth-bermed and roofed straw bale/cordwood home. Homestead features dog, chickens, moveable hoop house and expanding gardens with huge zones 3-5 which we share with lots 'o wildlife. PDC at Whole Systems Designs.
Heart of the Great Lakes in Southern Ontario
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Recent posts by Peter George

Could you post an image with your proposed 300 ft dam on it? That'd help a lot. I'm in a similar situation--little topsoil over bedrock. Working on "turkey ring" dam/pond today.
2 months ago
Placing a poultry run upslope of your garden can work well, too, if you get any regular rain at all.
Great advice here so far! I'm also in the middle of clearing brush for sheep fence with pigs and chickens doing the advance scouting and clearing. It's interesting that you've been advised to keep evergreens. It's great to have some for biodiversity and wind shelter, but less so for sheep fodder. As you're probably aware, sheep are fine with forbs predominating over grasses. You may want to consider adding a few C4 plants (e.g. switchgrass) for climate resiliency even in the PNW. If you're jamming in willow stakes, the tannins in them will alleviate the parasites that you seek to control with trefoil and chicory although I personally have still included those. One factor is whether or not you'll be overwintering the sheep. If so, you may want to include some classic coppice and pollard trees for nutritional and medicinal winter tree hay like elm (if any are native) and the afore-mentioned Oregon ash or another that likes wet. Hopefully you're able to reference Steve Gabriel's Silvopasture book. Amongst his top 8 recommended species (apart from the willow, poplars, honey locust, mulberry that others have mentioned) are black locust, mimosa and the alder that you already have. Advice so far that I love: Jack's seed mix info, adding calcium carbonate; and anything Fred Provenza says. Mix your nitrogen fixer forbs and trees with your non-fixers, plan how to both include and exclude livestock from any immature or mature rows/planting beds. You may also want to check out Sarah Flack's The Art & Science of Grazing, and William Bryant Logan's Sproutlands.
Want snakes? Put opaque plastic sheets on the ground--not clear translucent--even white can work. As you fry whatever plants are underneath so that you can plant your preferences subsequently, you'll create a snake magnet. When you plant the area, shift the plastic to somewhere nearby so that the snakes still have a home. I'm designing long-term repurposed old metal panels as garden bed edging. It'll keep out weeds and be raised slightly off the ground--just enough for snakes to slither under. Win-win-win.
3 months ago
Want snakes? Put opaque plastic sheets on the ground--not clear translucent--even white can work. As you fry whatever plants are underneath so that you can plant your preferences subsequently, you'll create a snake magnet. When you plant the area, shift the plastic to somewhere nearby so that the snakes still have a home. I'm designing long-term repurposed old metal panels as garden bed edging. It'll keep out weeds and be raised slightly off the ground--just enough for snakes to slither under. Win-win-win.
3 months ago
Cross-platform announcements via Hootsuite et al. Get it outside the Permie community. Identify a handful of culture's hot-button behemoths who would be likely to support it or be against it. The more quixotic the combos the better. Trump, Duchess of Cambridge, Obama, Bieber, Ariana Grande--whoever) Find contact info for their managers/agents/handlers. Send them a well-crafted email/snail mail/whatever media succinct package outlining the project. Also target a handful of high-profile "Greenies" who are likely to support it and give same pitch to them (Eliot Coleman, Nigella Lawson, Monty Don, Leo Di, Joel Salatin, etc.)

Most of them will not support it or not respond. But then you can lead your posts/Igrams/Youtube segment/boosted Fbooks, etc. by shouting "Taylor Swift, Donald Trump and Shark Tank's Kevin O'Leary DID NOT support this world-changing pitch. But Chris Hemsworth (or insert name of surprise high-profile supporter), Eliot Coleman, and Joel Salatin love it. You decide for yourself--here's what it is...."

The high profile names should garner some traction and fringe audiences will hopefully be piqued by the few but excellent images you include with many, many hashtags & contact info.

Maybe even consider paying someone a small sum who does this stuff for a living... .

Failing that, there's always Youtoobs of scantily clad people with bizarre animal headdresses picking and eating greens while wallowing in a Mike Oehler greenhouse!
3 months ago
Our new "Dead Hedge" under construction. Windbreak, snow & dust catcher, bird/mammal/insect habitat, soil creator & fungus booster, and more... Areas to the right of photo are poor pasture with so little soil there's swaths of exposed bedrock. Some hedge posts are re-bar pinned into solid bedrock due to total lack of soil!, Otherwise we'd hugel it. It'll be the east half of a sun trap, too. There'll be a shallow-soiled perennial shrub bed parallel with it leeward. Already seen: 4 species of birds on/in it never seen there before. They can plant the fodder shrubs in it!
5 months ago
Welcome Yury. I live on the North American Great Lakes, and I have travelled past Russia's great lake Baikal. I'm wondering whether your EM product has components from Lake Baikal or is particularly suited to lake environments? Thanks.
7 months ago
Nathan Jarvis: Did you ever try the Deere subsoiler? How did it do?
8 months ago

Travis J. wrote:As for heating, I noticed around here the Amish put in a woodstove in their greenhouses about 1/3 of the way from the front of it. Then they run the stovepipe out the back at a very shallow angle all the way to the backwall at the top, then turn it of course and go up a bit for draft, but I assume they do this so that the chimney helps heat the greenhouse with a minimal of wood.



Great tip from Travis. And then you could even place mass around the length of the horizontal stovepipe. Put a masonry shelf above the pipe and then rest your seedlings on top. maybe with reflective panels to direct the heat up to above the pipe. Or wrap the whole horizontal pipe with some form of box surrounded by mass like gravel. Many fun options...
11 months ago