Bryant RedHawk

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since May 15, 2014
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Part Nakota, part Irish. The Nakota took over long ago but still lives in two worlds, the European world and the first people's world. He lives on a small (15 + acres) piece of mother earth deep in the woods. Was trained in the cooper's arts as a child, since the family owned a cooperage. He has been a carpenter, and timber wright but love all aspects of farming.He holds a BS in Chemistry and Biology and a MS in Horticulture. Worked for the USDA for 16 years. Then PHD in Microbiology defended. Redhawk and his wife Wolf are setting up to be fully self sustaining, growing all their own foods and collecting rain water. "Soon we will be self sustaining and closer to being off the grid" he said when asked about future plans. They continue their own research both in Agriculture and soils with the hope to make the world more like it used to be, before mankind began screwing up the Earth Mother. This is the only way humankind will survive, we must fix what we have broken.
Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Recent posts by Bryant RedHawk

What species of conifer? And were any of the chips from walnut or eucalyptus species. Try some turned milk poured on the chip pile. It sounds like the decomposition isn't very far along. Mushrooms won't appear until the whole chip pile is occupied by the spawn.
1 month ago
hau Jen,  the way I have handled gum balls is turn to cha r the ones you can separate easily. The rest needs to be heaped in a cone shape. Once again we want to get the heap hot enough (160)) to kill the germ of those gum seeds. It might take 2 turns and repeats to get the majority of the gum seeds. Hope that helps.

Redhawk
1 month ago
In your situation the bokashi method would work better and you will end up with a better garden production. The method has been used in Korea and Japan for centuries. You just have to dump it back and forth in buckets to add o2 before you spread it on the soil or trench it in. You could, as an option trench the left over veg directly into the garden in the off season, should you have one.  

Redhawk
2 months ago
It is important to add browns (carbon) any time you make an addition of green matter such as vegetables, grass, fresh cuttings, etc. If you don't then you will end up with nothing that is compos.

Redhawk
2 months ago

Emilie McVey wrote:Don't know if this question is in the correct thread, but...
I have a compost pile, of sorts, in the back of my yard.  Originally I dumped all my veggie scraps on it, for about four years, as well as dead/dying plants and twigs I picked up.  It never really looked like the rich, developed compost I've seen pictures of, and I can't say it really helped my garden beds.

Now, during the warm months, I toss my food scraps into covered five gallon buckets, and after it's full and has marinated a few weeks, I get DH to dig a hole and pour it in.  Lots of stinky liquid, chunks of carrots, orange peels, apple cores, etc.  (I used to run the marinated scraps thru an old food processor so it would  break down faster, but it was a time-consuming and very smelly process, so I gave it up.)  Do you all think burying that gross stuff, as my family calls it, is actually doing my gardens good, or are the big pieces of peppers, potatoes, lettuce, apple cores, etc. taking so long to break down that it's not enriching the beds all that much?



Clay needs to be under the composting materials so leachate can percolate through and change the structure (by fungal clumping)  of the superfine particles (clay). Burying fermenting veg. Is along the thinking of the Korean method, which works well. It also is similar to first people's corn planting method. Kudos to you.

Redhawk
2 months ago
Excellent question. Fresh wood chips perhaps more uniformly than already decaying wood. Nutrients that have been already consumed by bacteria aren't lost but will remain in the soil surrounding the laying wood. Chipping such wood will speed the continuation of decay and inoculate the soil you spread the new chips. I would not hesitate to chip wood that is already breaking down, think of those chips as a cross of wood chips and fungi slurry, that is the effect you should experience.

Redhawk
2 months ago
There are several species of mushrooms that prefer pines and other conifers that are very good to eat. Chicken of the woods is probably the best known.

Redhawk
2 months ago
I am sorry but I don't have a way to show what I'm talking about.
4 months ago
It looks like there is to much space between the water line and the siphon tube inlet.
4 months ago
Where in the water flow line.is the siphon located? It should be below the water inlet so the water flow suction pulls the fluid into the water stream.
4 months ago