kadence blevins

pollinator
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since Dec 01, 2012
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Recent posts by kadence blevins

With the habro x domestic manual pollination.. saving seeds from those fruits.. plants from those seeds.. Those F1 plants will most likely be able to self pollinate or cross pollinate with each other?

And habro (neandermato) can only be pollen dad to domestic?

This project is so interesting. I really don't need another project but I added a big list of tomatoes to my seed list anyway! After getting Joseph's book it makes more sense to me, coming back to read this thread from the beginning.
1 month ago
Thanks! I'm only doing roma (determinate) and San Marzano (indeterminate) this year. I was hoping to order a bunch of different varieties from baker creek and start next year. I'll have to look at the sites again and look for exserted varieties.
1 month ago
I can't find a source with a plain explanation so here goes!
I'm considering just doing a tomato grex next year. When mixing tomatoes and varieties is there simple dominant/recessive for determinate and indeterminate?
I'm kind of thinking to just do indeterminate varieties but there are some cool traits in varieties that are determinate.

Resources very welcome also!
1 month ago
Ok.. full stop.. haha..
I figured out how to do the corn to minimize cross pollination. We'll see how it goes. The sweet corn is 75 day so it can go next to the harmony grain corn, 85-115 day. Then as far as I can make it (about 100ft) another block will have the high carotene corn and flour corn, both 100 days, which will be planted two weeks apart.

I finally decided to just hand pollinate a bunch of the squash. I'm going into this with the idea that I'm going to narrow down what works for me and what I like. So I can hand pollinate some for purity that I can keep pure seed from.
But... Since I'm going to try hand pollinating why not play? Haha.. So I've listed what to hand pollinate to attempt cross breeding and see how it goes. I've been doing some more research and it seems like some people report Moschata crosses work more often when the Moschata is the female of the cross. So I'm going to try a bunch of crosses that way just to see.

Butternut pure (Moschata)
x acorn
x pie pumpkin
x Nanticoke
x jarrahdale
x candy roaster

Field pumpkin x pie pumpkin (pepo)

Pie pumpkin pure (pepo)
x field pumpkin

Nanticoke pure (maxima)
x jarrahdale
x roaster

Jarrahdale pure (maxima)
x Nanticoke
x roaster

Candy roaster pure (maxima)
x Nanticoke
x jarrahdale

I don't like acorn that much so I'm not going to worry about them, they'll just be for eating. The lemon I'm doing for fun really, so I likely won't bother with them unless they turn out super awesome. Then I'll just hand pollinate a couple for seed.
3 months ago
Ok I'm trying to plot out things on graph paper finally. So just to triple check myself... I should be able to alternate the families (pepo, maxima, moschata) and the families will very very rarely pollinate between them and the offspring if it does happen will be the oddball seedless fruits?

10ft long rows, same variety rows 6ft apart. When change in variety will be 10ft between rows. Trying to make it in blocks instead of rows to spread apart the families. Would this work to minimize cross pollinating like between lemon and acorn,.. between jarrahdale and Georgia roaster, etc to separate the families like this?
I was going to let the pie and field pumpkins cross pollinate, they will be mostly to feed the livestock anyway.

Nanticoke, maxima, 2 rows.
Butternut, moschata, 1 row.
Acorn, pepo, 2 row.
-(Blocks of corn and veg)-
Jarrahdale, maxima, 1 row.
Butternut, moschata, 1 row.
Lemon, pepo, 2 row.
-(Blocks of corn and veg)-
Georgia roaster, maxima, 2 row.
Sugar pie pumpkin, pepo, 2 row.
Connecticut field pumpkin, pepo, 2 row.
3 months ago

Joseph Lofthouse wrote:Yesterday, I cleaned and winnowed seeds: Beans, corn, and sunflower. Next step is to cycle them through the freezer to kill insects. Germination testing after that.



Do you leave them in the freezer for a certain length of time? Luckily I haven't had seeds get bug-y but would be very good to know :)
3 months ago
Batting for quilts comes off a large drum on a machine in order to make it that big in one intact batt. For that you'd be best off sending the fiber to a mill who does it.
On a small scale done by hand there is several better options...

Wash fiber. sew small pocket, stuff with fiber, sew pockets together. There is a good example in the BBC series "war time farm" which can be found easily on YouTube.

You could felt a large piece like the Mongolians do for yurts and make it blanket sized. It would be nice in it's own right. You could also sew a quilt top for it. Mind that felt will continue to shrink with washing! If you do a regular quilt top and back you will want to do ties and not sew-quilt it because the top will rumple with every washing as the wool shrinks. If done with ties you could easily cut the ties and wash the quilt part separate from the felt inner part. This would also allow you to wash the felt less as it wouldn't need washed so much.
3 months ago
Based on the halo that can be seen in the pictures I'm going to say x2 on finding someone to alter the neckline. Also, if taking it back and knitting a smaller trim you'd have some yarn leftover to save for mending that may be done later.

From the halo in the pictures it looks like the fiber was a blend and not dehaired. Which makes sense being actually from Peru, I don't know a ton about it but I don't think dehairing machines are used there. They just grade the fiber and different grades go to best uses softest to coarsest, rather than running the fiber through a machine to remove the coarsest fibers.

Remember that prickly feel is actually your skin reaction to the amount of coarser fibers poking out from the average. Coarse fiber doesn't have to be prickly and much softer fiber can be prickly if there is above a certain percentage of fibers that are coarser blended in.
5 months ago
This is a pair of my handspun handknit socks. I wore the soles and there was a small hole about fingernail size in one, and a thumb sized hole in the other. Plus they were thinning across the pad of the foot.
I have done a woven darn before and wanted to try a knitted darn. So I finally did! It's really easy, if you can knit a sock then you can totally do a knitted darn. I didn't think the yarn would unravel much more but I did use the tail to weave around the hole and weave it in, just to be sure.
After that I put a small jar in the sock and wove yarn up and down between the stitches across the thinning section for each sock. It's practically invisible.
6 months ago
This is a pair of my handspun handknit socks. I wore the soles and there was a small hole about fingernail size in one, and a thumb sized hole in the other. Plus they were thinning across the pad of the foot.
I have done a woven darn before and wanted to try a knitted darn. So I finally did! It's really easy, if you can knit a sock then you can totally do a knitted darn. I didn't think the yarn would unravel much more but I did use the tail to weave around the hole and weave it in, just to be sure.
After that I put a small jar in the sock and wove yarn up and down between the stitches across the thinning section for each sock. It's practically invisible.
6 months ago