• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Can oyster mushrooms be grown in cold temperatures?

 
Annah Rachel
Posts: 112
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't know much about mushrooms, but I read this article recently: http://www.treehugger.com/corporate-responsibility/growing-oyster-mushrooms-in-coffee-grounds.html

I want to do this, but I would have to put them in my sun room or outside so they would get enough light since my house is sort of dark. Would it be too cold for them, or does it not matter?
 
Abe Connally
Posts: 1502
Location: Chihuahua Desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
you can grow several types around 50-60 degrees F. They do need a bit of time at 70 degrees for the mycelium, but for fruiting, 50 does fine. I use the garage this time of the year.
 
Annah Rachel
Posts: 112
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Abe Connally wrote:you can grow several types around 50-60 degrees F. They do need a bit of time at 70 degrees for the mycelium, but for fruiting, 50 does fine. I use the garage this time of the year.


It's usually in the 40's though =/
 
tel jetson
steward
Posts: 3346
Location: woodland, washington
75
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
where are you at, Annah? mushrooms, like so many other things, are seasonal. depending on where you're located, using a variety of strains and species of oyster can extend the season of harvest.
 
Annah Rachel
Posts: 112
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
tel jetson wrote:where are you at, Annah? mushrooms, like so many other things, are seasonal. depending on where you're located, using a variety of strains and species of oyster can extend the season of harvest.


I am in Port Angeles, WA =]
 
tel jetson
steward
Posts: 3346
Location: woodland, washington
75
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
you'll be just fine. this isn't the time of year to have them outside, but you can order some sawdust spawn and increase it inside all winter on coffee grounds and/or wood chips or other substrate and then fruit outside once the weather warms up a bit.

consider wine caps (Stropharia rugosoannulata), too. you can do the same spawn expansion inside until daytime temps are getting near 60 Fahrenheit. I don't know that coffee grounds will work, but straw and/or wood chips with some dirt mixed in are great. they're great in the garden.
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1052
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
im assuming a half buried stump would work too because the mycellium could retreat underground when cold and fruit on the upper half when warm...
 
richard valley
Posts: 223
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The Grey Dove, is sold by more than one name, can be grown 45 to 65 degrees. We have some growing indoors and plan to move some outside when the snow is gone.
 
Tannim Kyraxx
Posts: 24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Annah Isenberg wrote:I don't know much about mushrooms, but I read this article recently: http://www.treehugger.com/corporate-responsibility/growing-oyster-mushrooms-in-coffee-grounds.html

I want to do this, but I would have to put them in my sun room or outside so they would get enough light since my house is sort of dark. Would it be too cold for them, or does it not matter?


they really don't need much light at all they just use the light to tell em which way is up
 
I agree, here's the link: http://richsoil.com/pdc
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic