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Permaculture Design Course
June 13th - 26th, 2021
Near Missoula, Montana

permaculture design course 2021 wheaton Labs

click here for early bird PDC prices
Early Bird Prices end January 31st!!!


An Advanced PDC:
A proper Permaculture Design Course (PDC) has a well defined syllabus. Most PDCs are crafted for beginners - and a lot of professionals get bored. Our PDC assumes that the student is desring a course with a bit more substance and grit. This PDC is designed for scientists, engineers, educators or people with a lot of current knowledge of permaculture.

Alan Booker, an engineer himself, has developed a format that caters to these people. Alan’s course will cover everything a PDC normally covers, but is packed with information that can help advanced or expert students take their knowledge to the next level.



Technical Permaculture Design:
The focus of this PDC is on the technical aspects of permaculture and on professional landscape designing for clients. You will be surrounded by like-minded people, and together you will not only learn the framework to survive in a rapidly changing world, but to thrive. You will also develop the skills to heal damaged landscapes while providing for your own needs.

In this course you are designing from the get go. Every new piece of information, every new concept, is delivered in sequence so that it is immediately relevant and applicable. Your design unfolds in step with the days subjects. This helps the learning to really take root in your mind. Learn how to make really good effective decisions. We can't emphasize how important this is if you want to make effective long-lasting change in your life.

Every student will work through the entire design project individually, but always with the support of their design group and the instructors. Students will have multiple chances to present their design ideas and get feedback throughout the course of the first 13 days, building to the final design project presentations on the last day. During these final presentations, each student will present their own design project to the group as if they were presenting to a professional client.

This course is designed to help you really start thinking like a designer. Even if you have a lot of practical experience is various aspects of homesteading already, the Homesteaders PDC will move you past simply thinking in terms of isolated systems and into designing integrated, whole landscapes.

Course Schedule



This is the official schedule. It is possible that a few details might change.

Day 0: Check In (Saturday, June 14)
Check-In: 9:00am - 7:00pm MST
Get Settled In: Find your camp site and setup.
Tour of the Lab: starts promptly at 9:30am
Tour of Base Camp: after lunch starting at 1:30pm
Sleep: Try to get plenty of rest. We start early and you have a full day jam-packed with information tomorrow.

Day 1: Introduction and Overview (Sunday, June 15)
Session 1: Introduction and Overview
Session 2: Ethics in Design
Session 3: Design Concepts 1
Session 4: Design Concepts 2
Design Session: Design Project Overview
Evening Session: Group Design Charrette

Day 2: Methods of Design (Monday, June 16)
Session 1: Methods of Design Part 1
Session 2: Methods of Design Part 2
Session 3: Methods of Design Part 3
Session 4: Methods of Design Part 4
Design Session: Design Property Tour

Day 3: Understanding Pattern (Tuesday, June 17)
Session 1: Pattern Understanding Part 1
Session 2: Pattern Understanding Part 2
Session 3: Pattern Understanding Part 3
Session 4: Pattern Understanding Part 4
Design Session: How to Conduct a Client Interview
Evening Session: Group Design Workshop

Day 4: Climate and Trees (Wednesday, June 18)
Session 1: Climate Factors Part 1
Session 2: Climate Factors Part 2
Session 3: Trees & Their Energy Transactions Part 1
Session 4: Trees & Their Energy Transactions Part 2
Design Session: The Client Interview
Evening Session: Introduction to Ecology

Day 5: Water and Soil (Thursday, June 19)
Session 1: Water Part 1
Session 2: Water Part 2
Session 3: Soils Part 1
Session 4: Soils Part 2
Design Session: Software Design Tools
Evening Session: Soil Analysis with the Microscope

Day 6: Soils, Compost, Crops and Seeds (Friday, June 20)
Session 1: Soils Part 3
Session 2: Compost & Aerated Compost Tea
Session 3: Annnual Crop Gardening
Session 4: Seeds & Seed Saving



Day 7: Break (Saturday, June 21)
No required sessions. Instructors will be available during the afternoon to help with design projects.
Optional Bonus Evening Session: Herbal Medicince

Day 8: Earthworks (Sunday, June 23)
Session 1: Earthworks Part 1
Session 2: Earthworks Part 2
Session 3: Earthworks Part 3
Session 4: Earthworks Part 4
Design Session: Gathering Climate & Land-form Data
Evening Session: Conservation and Circular Design

Day 9: Humid Tropics & Drylands (Monday, June 23)
Session 1: Humid Tropics Part 1
Session 2: Humid Tropics Part 2
Session 3: Dryland Strategies Part 1
Session 4: Dryland Strategies Part 2
Design Session: Building a Base Map
Evening Session: Movie Night

Day 10: Temperate Climates & Pasture Systems (Tuesday, June 24)
Session 1: Temperate Climates Part 1
Session 2: Temperate Climates Part 2
Session 3: Pasture Systems & Rotational Grazing
Session 4: Food Forests and Perennial Production Systems
Design Session: Sector & Zone Analysis, Designing Water & Access
Evening Session: Learning the Plants of Your Biome

Day 11: Appropriate Technology (Wednesday, June 25)
Session 1: Working with Energy Flows
Session 2: Natural Building Methods
Session 3: The Permaculture Kitchen
Session 4: Sanitation & Health
Design Session: Siting Mainframe Forestry, Buildings, and Permanent Fencing
Evening Session: Question & Answer Night - Alan Booker and Paul Wheaton

Day 12: Aquaculture and Animals (Thursday, June 26)
Session 1: Aquaculture
Session 2: Animal Systems Part 1
Session 3: Animal Systems Part 2
Session 4: Food Storage & Seasonal Eating
Design Session: The In-fill Mosaic and Aquaculture
Evening Session: Design Project Work Time

Day 13: Structures, Community and Economy (Friday, June 27)
Session 1: Designing Invisible Structures
Session 2: Legal Structures & Community Organization
Session 3: Economics & Money Systems
Session 4: Village Development & Human Scale
Design Session: Preparing for the Design Presentation
Evening Session: Design Project Work Time

Day 14: Design Project Presentations (Saturday, June 28)
Morning Session: Design Project Workshop
Afternoon Session: Student Presentations of Design Projects
Evening Session: Student Talent Night



Instructors

Alan Booker -- Instructor
Alan Booker is the founder and executive director of the Institute of Integrated Regenerative Design, which trains professional design practitioners to create systems that are ecosystemic, biocompatible, and regenerative. With over 30 years experience in engineering and 20 years in sustainable design, Alan is the author of multiple books. In addition to teaching PDCs, he also provides consulting and workshops on earthworks, soil remediation, composting, forest gardening, holistic management of pastureland, keyline design, aquaculture and aquaponics, off-grid energy systems, and natural building systems.

Paul Wheaton -- Host/Instructor
Paul Wheaton, The Duke of Permaculture, is an author, producer, and certified advanced master gardener. He has created hundreds of youtube videos, hundreds of podcasts, multiple DVDs, and written dozens of articles and a book. As the lead mad scientist at Wheaton Labs, he's conducted experiments resulting in rocket stoves and ovens, massive earthworks, solar dehydrators and much more.

Helen Atthowe -- Instructor
Helen has an MS in Horticulture and Agricultural Ecology from Rutgers University; worked at Rutgers in tree fruit IPM; studied natural farming with Masanobu Fukoka. She famrs a 211 acre farm in eastern Oregon with her husband, where they have a mixed fruit and hazelnut orchard, small grain and dry bean production, vegetable gardens, high tunnels, and greenhouse.

Thomas Elpel -- Instructor
Thomas is an author, natural builder, educator, and conservationist. He has authored multiple books: Foraging the Mountain West, Botany in a Day, Shanleya's Quest and numerous others about plant identification, wilderness survival, and sustainable living. He has multiple videos: Building a Slipform Stone House from the Bottom Up, How to Make a Grass Rope, Build Your own Masonry Fireplace - Masonry Heater - Masonry Stove, and many more. Thomas regularly teaches classes on plant identification, primitive skills and natural building. He is founder/director of Green University, LLC in Pony, Montana.

Chase Jones -- Instructor
Chase Jones is a permaculture designer and consultant with a background in anthropology, conservation archaeology, ecology, and geospatial analysis. He is the co-founder of Biodesic Strategies, a permaculture design and construction service that offers ecological design and green infrastructure installation. For the PDC, Chase will bring both his practical consulting experience and background in the geospatial sciences to the process of helping students understand the tools needed to capture site data, synthesize an accurate base map, and develop a working understanding of any design site



Tickets

Work Trades for Permaculture Technology Jamboree, PDC, and SKIP
Work 7 weeks in Bootcamp for a ticket to the PDC!

click here for early bird PDC prices
Early Bird Prices end January 31st!!!
COMMENTS:
 
master steward
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Nicole Alderman
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Super Early Bird Prices end September 30th--only four days away!
permaculture-homesteading-events-going-on-an-adventure.jpg
permaculture design course super early bird prices
 
gardener
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What kind of drawing/drafting/paper supplies are needed for this?

I have some, and am considering whether I need to bring some of it.
 
steward
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Ash Jackson wrote:What kind of drawing/drafting/paper supplies are needed for this?

I have some, and am considering whether I need to bring some of it.



I think we will have lots.  

If you ask again in early feb, lara should be here and I suspect that she might be able to put together a bit of an inventory for you.

 
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Do you have any book recommendations before I attend your course?

Any teachers you recommend I seek out to communicate with?
 
Nicole Alderman
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Hi Bobby!

I thought I'd sent you the google form to fill out back in September--did it not make it?

Once you fill it out, I'll get you added to the private forum. Alan Booker is active in the forum, and even has a list of book recommendations for participants in the private forum.

I hope this helps!
 
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paul wheaton wrote:

Ash Jackson wrote:What kind of drawing/drafting/paper supplies are needed for this?

I have some, and am considering whether I need to bring some of it.



I think we will have lots.  

If you ask again in early feb, lara should be here and I suspect that she might be able to put together a bit of an inventory for you.



I definitely remember making a pile of these sort of things when I was organizing some stuff in the library in September. Ash, I'll give you more specifics once I'm there in feb!
 
paul wheaton
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Bobby Fallon wrote:Do you have any book recommendations before I attend your course?

Any teachers you recommend I seek out to communicate with?




Books:  every PDC is based on the BBB https://amzn.to/3o4VXSW ...  in a recent podcast, alan, the instructor for THIS pdc said that it is currently cheaper to get it from the publisher and pay the freaky big shipping costs:  https://www.tagari.com/permaculture-designers-manual/



This PDC is reall Alan's show.  And what I will do is pop in rarely and speak only if Alan asks me to.  What I did for the last two PDCs is to be there for the full hour during each of the three meals per day.   i sit at the southernmost table.  I am glad to visit with anybody on any topic or be stone silent.  In time, it seems a few people wanted to join me at every meal and they had a list of questions for each meal.   I am also glad to give an evening presentation or two if there is interest.  All this is to say that I have a fully published book (Building a Better World in Your Backyard) and an about to be published book (SKIP) and a pseudo community book available as a draft (Permaculture Thorns).  I thoroughly enjoy the idea of discussing these.


Next book:   https://amzn.to/38JeVI8


I was about to start a big list and then I thought of this:  https://permies.com/w/book-reviews


 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Hi Bobby!

I thought I'd sent you the google form to fill out back in September--did it not make it?

Once you fill it out, I'll get you added to the private forum. Alan Booker is active in the forum, and even has a list of book recommendations for participants in the private forum.

I hope this helps!



Hey Bobby,

Welcome to the class!

I keep an eye on the private PDC forum and try to answer any questions that pop up there. Also feel free to send me a Purple Mooseage if you have a question you would like to ask more privately.

I will be scheduling another Zoom meeting sometime in March so everyone signed up by then can meet each other and we can talk through getting ready for the class. I will also be announcing pretty soon that everyone who signs up for the PDC will be invited to participate (for free) in a special 8-week online class with me in April and May working through my new book Observation for Design. This book is designed to be a great compliment to the material we cover in the PDC and will provide some great preparation for attending. More details to follow.
 
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Oooh, this looks exciting!

Between SKIP and PDC, which would you recommend a relative newbie take first? Is one course typically prerequisite to the other? It seems like PDC is more "book learning" whereas SKIP is hands-on.

I do not wish to become a professional designer, but I want to learn enough to feel confident on creating my own permie homestead.

TIA for the advice!
 
paul wheaton
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Austin Durant wrote: It seems like PDC is more "book learning" whereas SKIP is hands-on.



This is the exact answer to your question.

A PDC is going to cover the stuff in the permaculture designer's manual.   Our PDC is gonna shove three times more information into your head - all in two weeks.   And when you are done, you will be a certified permaculture designer.

If you show up to the SKIP event with BB40, you will probably finish the SKIP event with PEP1 certification.  But if you don't care about the certification, you will have a LOT of hands on experience.  And it isn't the sort of hands on experience where you did something with somebody - it will be 100% you doing the thing.  

Our PDC is for scientists, engineers, architects and teachers.  I think it would also be a fit for somebody that has listened to most of my podcasts.   The information is going to be presented at an intense rate.   Most people will not like it and will prefer a "normal" PDC.   This PDC is designed for people that would probably find a "normal" PDC to be boring.



 
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Austin Durant wrote:
Between SKIP and PDC, which would you recommend a relative newbie take first? Is one course typically prerequisite to the other? It seems like PDC is more "book learning" whereas SKIP is hands-on.


Hi Austin,

I’m attending all three and wanted to share some information with you. There are no prerequisites for either but it is recommended to be familiar with permaculture to take the PDC!  

You can learn about the 2017 PDC videos here.  The SKIP and PTJ are definitely more hands on and the PDC is lots of lessons and design experience.
 
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I'm just seeing this for the first time for some reason. It looks right up my street, but clashes with term time, so is a non-starter unfortunately. I hope it goes well for you.
 
Austin Durant
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paul wheaton wrote:
A PDC is going to cover the stuff in the permaculture designer's manual.   Our PDC is gonna shove three times more information into your head - all in two weeks.   And when you are done, you will be a certified permaculture designer.


Thanks, Paul! I am a teacher and I am fairly technical/"book smart" so although it would be a stretch, I think I could hack your "nutrient-dense" PDC.

Do you recommend taking the video PDC series first, and then doing the in-person PDC course in June? Or would that be redundant?

Cheers!
 
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Hey, I'm new to the forums and to permaculture in general.  The PDC seems too advanced for me.  Is the PTJ + SKIP a good option for me?  What if I study real hard between now and the PDC- would that be doable?
 
Alan Booker
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Britton Sprouse wrote:Hey, I'm new to the forums and to permaculture in general.  The PDC seems too advanced for me.  Is the PTJ + SKIP a good option for me?  What if I study real hard between now and the PDC- would that be doable?



Hey Britton,

As the course instructor, maybe I am the best person to try to address your question.

One of the PDC's I taught a few years ago had two PhD's, six engineers, ...and a student just out of high school. One of the PhD's (in physics) at the end of the course said he was "stunned by the depth and scope of the information" in the course. The other PhD (biology) came back to take it again the next year because he wanted to hear it all again a second time.

But even though there was plenty in the class to challenge and engage the PhD's and engineers, the high school graduate also completed the course, gave an excellent design presentation, and got certified.

The reason this can work is because I approach the PDC from the standpoint of understanding and designing complex systems, teaching this in a way that builds directly on top of what you would normally cover in high school physics, chemistry, and biology. So somebody who is comfortable with these topics at the level they should be to graduate high school should be able to follow the course with a little work. I think it comes down to being engaged and curious, willing to do some research to fill in any areas you haven't quite mastered yet.

Folks who come to the class with a lot of domain-specific knowledge often were taught it in a siloed fashion, so there is a lot of new and rich information for them to explore when we jump into whole-systems thinking. They can bring all of their domain-specific experience with them, fitting it into a larger and more holistic context. I have had engineers and architects tell me that the PDC has helped them understand how their specific expertise fits into a much larger picture. They are probably the ones who get the most from the class, because I tried to design it to compliment and extend what they have already been taught in college. But even someone just out of high school who is engaged and works hard will be able to keep up and learn a tremendous amount (while maybe not being able to mine quite so much out of it as the engineers, scientists, architects, etc.).

So even though the curriculum is designed for people with a technical background, I think the basic prerequisites for the course are whether a person (1) has a good grounding in the basic sciences, (2) is willing to work hard and stretch themselves, and (3) is curious and has a passion to learn.

 
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Alan Booker wrote:Hey Britton,

As the course instructor, maybe I am the best person to try to address your question.

One of the PDC's I taught a few years ago had two PhD's, six engineers, ...and a student just out of high school. One of the PhD's (in physics) at the end of the course said he was "stunned by the depth and scope of the information" in the course. The other PhD (biology) came back to take it again the next year because he wanted to hear it all again a second time.

But even though there was plenty in the class to challenge and engage the PhD's and engineers, the high school graduate also completed the course, gave an excellent design presentation, and got certified.

The reason this can work is because I approach the PDC from the standpoint of understanding and designing complex systems, teaching this in a way that builds directly on top of what you would normally cover in high school physics, chemistry, and biology. So somebody who is comfortable with these topics at the level they should be to graduate high school should be able to follow the course with a little work. I think it comes down to being engaged and curious, willing to do some research to fill in any areas you haven't quite mastered yet.

Folks who come to the class with a lot of domain-specific knowledge often were taught it in a siloed fashion, so there is a lot of new and rich information for them to explore when we jump into whole-systems thinking. They can bring all of their domain-specific experience with them, fitting it into a larger and more holistic context. I have had engineers and architects tell me that the PDC has helped them understand how their specific expertise fits into a much larger picture. They are probably the ones who get the most from the class, because I tried to design it to compliment and extend what they have already been taught in college. But even someone just out of high school who is engaged and works hard will be able to keep up and learn a tremendous amount (while maybe not being able to mine quite so much out of it as the engineers, scientists, architects, etc.).

So even though the curriculum is designed for people with a technical background, I think the basic prerequisites for the course are whether a person (1) has a good grounding in the basic sciences, (2) is willing to work hard and stretch themselves, and (3) is curious and has a passion to learn.



Thank you so much for your thoughtful response.  I think I meet those prerequisites!  I'll be seriously considering the PDC for my summer plans.
 
Alan Booker
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Austin Durant wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:
A PDC is going to cover the stuff in the permaculture designer's manual.   Our PDC is gonna shove three times more information into your head - all in two weeks.   And when you are done, you will be a certified permaculture designer.


Thanks, Paul! I am a teacher and I am fairly technical/"book smart" so although it would be a stretch, I think I could hack your "nutrient-dense" PDC.

Do you recommend taking the video PDC series first, and then doing the in-person PDC course in June? Or would that be redundant?

Cheers!



Hey Austin,

Tim's PDC that is in the video course has a lot of excellent material and is well worth watching. The PDC that I teach is aimed at a slightly different audience and as such the curriculum is much more of a technical deep-dive. So if you are interested in both, I think they would compliment each other.

A lot of serious permies end up doing more than one PDC. The two main reasons are (1) each set of instructors bring their own unique perspectives, experiences, and approach, and (2) so much material is covered in a good PDC that you will probably have to hear it more than once to take it all in.

Most of the folks showing up to my PDC haven't watched the video course, so it certainly isn't required. But I would also say that it could be a good preparation if you have the time and interest.
 
Austin Durant
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Alan Booker wrote:Tim's PDC that is in the video course has a lot of excellent material and is well worth watching. The PDC that I teach is aimed at a slightly different audience and as such the curriculum is much more of a technical deep-dive. So if you are interested in both, I think they would compliment each other.


Awesome. Thanks for the helpful clarification, Alan! Hope to see you in June!
 
Nicole Alderman
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