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Make twine - PEP BB textile.sand.twine

BB textiles - sand badge
 
pollinator
Posts: 920
Location: Chicago
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I used fiber from the dried stalks of Rose Mallow, gathered in spring:



Like many mallows, it is slimy when wet, and needed a good 2 month rhetting.


I used the thigh/palm method of twining


Total length over 24 ft; here you can see there are 6 loops over 48 inches (2 x 24):



I am impressed with this material, it is at least equal jute in strength.  Very long fibers.  Once you've soaked it long enough to get rid of th sliminess, easy to work with.
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Opalyn Rose approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify this badge bit complete. Nice way to show the length of your twine!

 
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Hey Skip team! I heard cordage could be made from mallow stems at the end of the season. So here, in winter, I harvested mallow stems. I treated them like nettles, and strippedoff the leaves and outer skin. The inner pith also had to come out, as it wasn't very pliable. The resulting fibers were usable! So I made all the twine I could from not-frlzen mallow I could find. It took 4 hours, and made about 8 feet.

Then I made simple twine from a natural, thin cordage I had lying around. I'm getting better at twisting the right directions! Here are about 18-inch diameter loops, making about 16 feet.

Altogether, 24 feet of twine.
20211116_155132.jpg
Raw stems
Raw stems
20211116_155156.jpg
Fibers
Fibers
20211116_204252.jpg
About 8 feet of mallow twine
About 8 feet of mallow twine
20211202_150853.jpg
Cordage, u plied
Cordage, u plied
20211202_150841.jpg
Starting loop
Starting loop
20211202_164355.jpg
Finishing knot
Finishing knot
20211203_084110.jpg
Rolled up with a ruler
Rolled up with a ruler
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Someone flagged this submission as not complete.
BBV price: 3
Note: From the BB text: In this project, you will make twine from local plant material like nettles, vining plants, or suitable grasses.

 
pioneer
Posts: 63
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This was a blast! I’ve never done any cordage or basket weaving, but I got inspired last summer and dried a bunch of stuff from the garden to try and learn this winter. First lesson: wild iris leaves are waaaaay too splitty. Garlic leaves and stems worked much better.

Process: soaked dried stems and leaves in a 5 gallon bucket while I did the dishes (~20 minutes)
Squished the stems with a rolling pin and peeled off sheets of fiber
Used the twist-and-pinch method

Results: 21+ feet of garlic twine. The stem portions produced a surprisingly stretchy, flexible cord. The leaf segments are also strong but lack give. Was a lot easier to work with though!

ETA: in case it isn’t clear from the photos, the yardstick shots are one continuous 21 ft length, I’ve just photographed the front and back of the yardstick separately.
8F34CDC1-F65E-4C3B-A80E-80042A5AFF37.jpeg
Raw material
Raw material
E3F9DD71-FDAD-47F0-B5DF-DBD52593BA14.jpeg
Soaking
Soaking
E78FD254-38F8-4CBD-95FD-5C885BC4D0CC.jpeg
Stem fiber sheets
Stem fiber sheets
7889BE1D-9869-4A50-AAF9-23A3580E9FC8.jpeg
One handed process photo :/
One handed process photo :/
2A941DE8-9012-41AC-8696-6606DF04CBCA.jpeg
4x3feet = 12
4x3feet = 12
6990CE3B-280C-4215-B624-2A691DA4E5FB.jpeg
+ 3x3ft = 21 total
+ 3x3ft = 21 total
578A24E0-A157-4D52-A8C8-5F352973EF3E.jpeg
Glamor shot. I love the colors
Glamor shot. I love the colors
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Mike Haasl approved this submission.

 
Posts: 55
Location: Zone 5a, Southern Wisconsin
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After looking for nettle all last spring, I recently discovered a huge patch right by my community garden. Time to make some twine!

Process:
First I stripped off all the leaves from the nettle.
Then I broke the stems with the pestle from my mortar and pestle.
From there, I peeled off the outer skin and made 4-5 strips.
With two of the strips, I twined them around each other and slowly wove in more strips as I reached the end, crushing and peeling more nettle as I needed it until I was done.

I may have gone a bit overboard on how much I collected, because this ended up making about 35 feet (For the last two pics, I have 13 loops next to ruler. Each long side of the loop is 12 inches, and the top and bottom curves are around 3 inches, that's around 30 inches per loop, so around 390 inches or 32.5 feet total)
*corrected # of loops and subsequent math
DSC_0450.JPG
Nettle patch
Nettle patch
DSC_0451.JPG
Close up of nettle
Close up of nettle
DSC_0574.JPG
Removing the leaves from the stems
Removing the leaves from the stems
DSC_0576.JPG
A bunch of leafless stems
A bunch of leafless stems
DSC_0590.JPG
Breaking the stems
Breaking the stems
DSC_0596.JPG
Twining the strips
Twining the strips
DSC_0610.JPG
Next day, more stem crushing
Next day, more stem crushing
DSC_0611.JPG
Opening up the stem
Opening up the stem
DSC_0616.JPG
Peeling off more nettle skin
Peeling off more nettle skin
DSC_0620.JPG
Twining so far
Twining so far
DSC_0622.JPG
Ending knot
Ending knot
DSC_0623.JPG
Beside a ruler
Beside a ruler
DSC_0624.JPG
Number of loops in the prior pic
Number of loops in the prior pic
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Someone approved this submission.

 
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I made twine from himalayan blackberry brambles.

Going from raw materials from the garden was fun (and extra motivating since I'm out of the state for a month and won't have access to blackberry vines for a while.)
I stripped the vines of their leaves, then ran my leather gloves over the vines to take off all the sharp thorn points.
Then I bashed each branch with a stone to loosen the fibers from the pith.
I stripped the fibers off.
Then I ran a knife over the fibers to remove the skin and warty thorn bits left.

I brought my shiz inside and then twisted the bugger together.
Had a lot more fiber than I needed. Good to know!
Here are two end result videos of the final measurement - excuse my nasty floor.
Pics below of various steps of the process and the final twine!



twine1.jpg
Bramble fibers. Say that ten times fast.
Bramble fibers. Say that ten times fast.
twine2.jpg
Scraping the outer skin from the fibers.
Scraping the outer skin from the fibers.
twine3.jpg
Pinched and twisted my way to victory.
Pinched and twisted my way to victory.
twine4.jpg
It ain't much, but it's twine. (Like "it's mine". No? Fine, I'll see myself out.)
It ain't much, but it's twine. (Like,
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Someone approved this submission.

 
pollinator
Posts: 228
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Making twine from blackberry brambles.
20220718_132046.jpg
BlackBerry brambles
BlackBerry brambles
20220718_141707.jpg
Twining the inner bark
Twining the inner bark
20220718_170203.jpg
21 feet of twine
21 feet of twine
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[url=https://permies.com/u/262093/Harmony-d%27Eyre]Harmony d'Eyre[/url] approved this submission.

 
pollinator
Posts: 344
Location: Pembrokeshire, UK
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I volunteer with a group most Fridays and, last week, someone taught me to make 2-ply cordage/twine. I used fronds from a Cabbage Tree (Cordyline) which I split into fibers and then twisted together, 3 or more at a time, into two strands which I plied to form twine.

My twine, which I finished in about 3 sessions (a total of maybe 3 or 4 hours, it took a while!), is approximately 35 feet. I'm quite surprised that 8 fronds was able to produce such a long length.

I've not tested the strength but it feels very sturdy and I'm not able to break it by hand.
palm-fronds-1.jpg
Raw materials #1
Raw materials #1
palm-fronds-2.jpg
Raw materials #2
Raw materials #2
splitting-fronds.jpg
I split the fronds roughly with a fingernail. This piece will be split 2 or 3 more times.
I split the fronds roughly with a fingernail. This piece will be split 2 or 3 more times.
split-fronds-fiber.jpg
Pile of fiber from one frond
Pile of fiber from one frond
WIP.jpg
In-progress shot
In-progress shot
test-pieces.jpg
Small, test pieces
Small, test pieces
closeup.jpg
Closeup of the small pieces
Closeup of the small pieces
complete-twine.jpg
Here is my finished twine
Here is my finished twine
10ft.jpg
Once along the measuring tape (10ft)
Once along the measuring tape (10ft)
35ft.jpg
More than 3x along the tape (>30ft)
More than 3x along the tape (>30ft)
35ft-proof.jpg
View along the tape
View along the tape
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Harmony Dybala approved this submission.
Note: Great-looking twine!

 
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