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Summary

Paul sits back down with Kyle and Mark to continue talking about how to buy land, although Mark takes a while to show up so they spend the time talking about residual income streams.

Whenever Paul brings up residual income streams he gets looked at like a snake oil salesman as people seem to default to thinking of get-rich-quick schemes whenever finances get brought up.  Kyle, being a musician, gets the idea much better – he put out a bunch of music and every couple of months he gets $20 from the sales.  Not much, but a start.  Whilst Paul has a few hundred different things out that all bring in a little and it totals up to over $1k per month.

Getting back on topic, both Paul and Sepp both advocate getting some slope, either for water retention or extending the growing season soil building in a cold climate.  A cold climate is better for soil building due to the bacteria that make the soil being inactive during the winter and slower in general, so if you build a hugelkultur bed in a cool climate it’ll last 10-30 years, but only 1-2 years in a tropical climate.  As for how much slope you want, a 45 degree would be a bit much simply because it’s steeper than most soils angle of repose (the maximum angle that it can be without collapsing) so it’ll be unstable.  A terrace can be used to flatten the land, but the problem is that they create flat land at the cost of even steeper walls that need a strong retaining wall, lest the terrace just flow down the hill.  10 to 15 degrees is quite comfortable and can just about support a straight road up in winter time, although 10 or less is safer for roads.  For other purposes, a range of slopes is good but if the land is mostly over 30 degrees, it’s probably not worth it.

Relevant Threads

Residual Income Stream forum

Hugelkultur forum

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This podcast was made possible thanks to:

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