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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the straw badge in Textiles.

For this BB, you will make three wax/oil cloths to use to wrap or store food.

wax oil cloth for food storage


With Beeswax

Here's a tutorial on how to make wax wraps with just beeswax, a baking sheet, cloth, and an oven:



You can also find recipes for mixing in oil like jajoba oil and pine resin to make the wrap easier to use here: The Complete Guide to DIY Beeswax Wraps (AND Beeless Vegan Food Wraps!) Apparently coconut oil made the wrap leave a oily film on everything the wrap was used on, but the jajoba oil and pine resin did not.

Mike Barkely shared this recipe here on permies:



Vegan Wax Wraps:

These can be made with soy wax:



Or with candillia wax:



And, Mountain Rose Herbs shows how to make them with carnauba wax, here: The Complete Guide to DIY Beeswax Wraps (AND Beeless Vegan Food Wraps!)


To complete this BB, the minimum requirements are:
- all natural cloth (cotton or linen are recommended, but any all natural fibre will work for the badge bit)
- all natural waxes/oils (no petroleum-based wax or mineral oil, etc)
- three wax cloths
- the wax cloths must fit around containers you have

To document your completion of the BB, provide proof of the following as pictures or a video (less than two minutes):
 - describe what oils/waxes you used, and what type of cloth you used
 - a process picture of applying the wax to the cloth
 - your finished wax cloth on to a storage container (jar, dish, bowl, etc), showing it works.
COMMENTS:
 
steward
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Approved submission
I haven't taken a picture of my wraps on a container yet. I'll edit this post when I have one!

I'd made these with my daughter back in April of this year, using the first tutorial listed above. I liked how simple it was!

These are a bit stiffer than wraps made with pine resin or something else added to the beeswax. They take a while for my cold hands to warm up. My husband almost always has hot hands, and has no problem putting the beeswax wraps on our dishes.
20200427_170541.jpg
My daughter helping pick out the fabric (and cut her own piece for her own wax wrap)
My daughter helping pick out the fabric (and cut her own piece for her own wax wrap)
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We have a giant block of beeswax, so I smacked of small chunks for the wraps
We have a giant block of beeswax, so I smacked of small chunks for the wraps
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wax on the wraps, about to go into the oven
wax on the wraps, about to go into the oven
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Finished beewax wraps (still need to take a picture of them on a container for the BB requirments)
Finished beewax wraps (still need to take a picture of them on a container for the BB requirements)
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My largest beeswax wrap, made especially to fit my large pyrex casserole dishes.
My largest beeswax wrap, made especially to fit my large pyrex casserole dishes.
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Barkley approved this submission.
Note: Looks good Nicole!

 
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Another recipe here.
 
Nicole Alderman
steward
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pollinator
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I made 4 of these out of cotton bedsheet.  Small squares for tops of jars and ramekins.

My usual method, grated beeswax onto the cloth, put it in 200 degree oven for a few minutes.





Staff note (gir bot) :

Nicole Alderman approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify that this badge bit is complete, and congratulate you on your Textile air badge!

 
gardener
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Here is my submission for the Textile - Straw - Make Wax Wraps BB.

I used the "bee" recipe from Mountain Rose Herbs - The Complete Guide to DIY Beeswax Wraps (AND Beeless Vegan Food Wraps!).  I really appreciated the research and experimentation that was shared in this post.  

I acquired organic beeswax, jojoba oil, and resin to make my wraps.  I used a printed cotton cloth that was in my fabric stash.

To document the completion of the BB, I have provided the following:
- describe what oils/waxes you used, and what type of cloth you used (above)
- a process picture of applying the wax to the cloth
- your finished wax cloth on to a storage container (jar, dish, bowl, etc), showing it works.
1.jpg
Ingredients
Ingredients
2.jpg
Applying mixture to cotton
Applying mixture to cotton
3.jpg
Finished - three for jars and one to be stitched for sandwich storage
Finished - three for jars and one to be stitched for sandwich storage
Staff note (gir bot) :

Nicole Alderman approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify that this badge bit is complete!

 
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I presume these are reusable?  What's the process for cleaning them?  Or is that in the video I have yet to watch?  :)
 
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I have questions. Has anyone worked with wax wraps in humid climates? I've not worked with beeswax or resin before...

I live in East Hawaii where it is warm and wet pretty much all the time. Coconut oil and other saturated fats are usually in a liquid state in my kitchen, which stays around 75-80 degrees F...

Will the wax/resin get melty at these temperatures, rendering the wraps useless for me?

(this is my first post on permies.... hello everyone!)
 
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Via Hermosa wrote:I have questions. Has anyone worked with wax wraps in humid climates? I've not worked with beeswax or resin before...

I live in East Hawaii where it is warm and wet pretty much all the time. Coconut oil and other saturated fats are usually in a liquid state in my kitchen, which stays around 75-80 degrees F...

Will the wax/resin get melty at these temperatures, rendering the wraps useless for me?

(this is my first post on permies.... hello everyone!)



Hello! Welcome to Permies, I'm sorry no one has gotten to your question yet. I don't have any experience with beeswax but a little bit of digging on google got me some answers:
I presume beeswax could handle your warm, humid kitchen since its melting point is about 145 degrees Fahrenheit

For the resin, the melting point depends on what you're using. But pine resin should be fine. I believe its melting point is higher than beeswax.
I also recall seeing some solid resin chilling on pine trees in East Texas where summer temperatures go over 100F and it is very humid
 
Mike Barkley
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Yes, the wraps made using this technique are cleanable with soap & water and able to withstand high temperatures. The rosins & special oils changes the characteristics of the wax. They feel something like a silicone baking sheet. I think they would work just fine in Hawaii. Eventually they develop small cracks but a few minutes in an oven smooths them out again.
 
pollinator
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I made beeswax wraps!
I used some pretty fabric from my family stash. The fabric had been unlabeled in the stash for decades, but I think/hope it is cotton. It burned to soft ash rather than melting when I burn-tested it. I used grated beeswax, sprinkled on the fabric and melted for a few minutes in a 225 degree Fahrenheit oven.

IMG_2038.JPG
materials
materials
IMG_2040.JPG
fabric cut to measure and pinked to avoid fraying
fabric cut to measure and pinked to avoid fraying
IMG_2041.JPG
ready to go in the oven
ready to go in the oven
IMG_2043.JPG
finished products
finished products
IMG_2050.JPG
finished products
finished products
IMG_2045.JPG
testing the seal - held the water without leaking until I rotated the glass, so not waterproof but still a bit impressive
testing the seal - held the water without leaking until I rotated the glass, so not waterproof but still a bit impressive
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Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
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Made some wax/oil wraps using muslin cloth.

The recipe was
35g beeswax
9g pine rosin
12g jojoba oil

Melted the ingredients in a glass jar in a water bath, then brushed on the melted mixture onto 12x12” sheets and placed them in a 200 degree oven to even put the coats and then gave them a final brushing.
5C0CF2E7-0D99-4A0D-A53C-EA00AC51C58F.jpeg
Ingredients for beeswax wraps
E24F8A68-B6EF-4CC0-93A7-A48121F33ECB.jpeg
Chopping up wax
618015FC-8D1D-4613-AA96-A44C85AC7129.jpeg
Chopping beeswax
02A7F637-F1E0-46A6-8B2E-DEC7AC8609E6.jpeg
Weighing resin
21BD1EB7-92E5-4957-98A2-AFA118C381B1.jpeg
Melting the wax
9058F9BA-2049-410D-B87E-5534AF85BD6C.jpeg
Applying melted wax to the wraps
35875875-1516-448A-8CF3-40FC0E8ACE66.jpeg
Drying the beeswax wraps
AB0578A1-68F7-44F3-922F-559A82D44B5E.jpeg
[Thumbnail for AB0578A1-68F7-44F3-922F-559A82D44B5E.jpeg]
7BF5CFAB-589D-471C-8F08-53E23A2A9786.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 7BF5CFAB-589D-471C-8F08-53E23A2A9786.jpeg]
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone flagged this submission as an edge case BB.
BBV price: 0
Note: Please specify the type of cloth.

Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
pollinator
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I’m grateful to Opalyn for bringing her left over ingredients from her wax cloth production to the PTJ and leading a workshop. Like her, I used the "bee" recipe from Mountain Rose Herbs - The Complete Guide to DIY Beeswax Wraps (AND Beeless Vegan Food Wraps!).    

Opalyn provided organic beeswax, jojoba oil, and resin to make my wraps.  I used organic unbleached muslin for my wraps.

I melted the beeswax, oil and resin in glass jars over rocket j tube, then spread the mix with a brush onto the clothes. The clothes were inserted into the rocket oven to further melt the ingredients so that I could smooth and even the distribution with the brush. They dried quickly and worked well to seal my jars of foraged pineapple weed.
0CF70D7B-04AF-401E-8843-19E6294F5403.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 0CF70D7B-04AF-401E-8843-19E6294F5403.jpeg]
38805680-8549-4692-BAE9-3B0BE9A49090.jpeg
Chopping beeswax
Chopping beeswax
C1F4FC20-2F33-4A76-85D3-A27E84D9ABF6.jpeg
Spreading wax mix
Spreading wax mix
45A3DC98-1DCF-491D-9B49-81834A690882.jpeg
Finished wraps work very well
Finished wraps work very well
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Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
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Looks great, makes me want to right out to the kitchen and get busy.
 
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I like Beeswax wraps a lot, I've been using a few I brought years ago. Ultimately for how many wraps I made, and still can make, this is far more economical than buying them and the results are pretty comparable. I made more than I needed so I can give it to my best friend's family.

I followed the jojoba oil, beeswax and resin recipe given in the first post.

The cotton came from a Joann Fabrics. I sourced the other supplies from Etsy. The beeswax came from GardenerBees, the jojoba Oil from ShopAfroCosmetics, and the Pine Resin from CreekwoodNaturals.

Starting Fabric

A ton of variously sized cuts, from 14x14 to 10x10, there are a little over 10 of them.


I mixed everything up and put it in a double boiler and here I am applying it to one of the first sheets.


Here's a bunch of finished sheets


And, finally here are three of the smaller ones, covering two mason jars and a bowl.


They stick pretty well to everything I tried them on.
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
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I used quilting cottons and organic beeswax, jojoba oil, and pine resin for these wraps. I followed these instructions:
https://blog.mountainroseherbs.com/the-complete-guide-to-diy-beeswax-wraps-including-a-beeless-vegan-food-wrap

From the instructions, I was so worried about oversaturating the fabric that I went too far the other way and had to go back over the pieces a few times to get proper coverage. You want to pretty much fully paint the entire surface of the fabric (as long as your brush isn't super drippy).

I made 4 sizes - a small 5" one for jars and small containers, ~9" for bowls and medium containers, a large 12" one to fit over my biggest salad and mixing bowls, and a 12"x18" one for the big casserole dish and the plate we always use for cookies.
20220305_170856.jpg
materials
materials
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cutting pieces with pinking shears
cutting pieces with pinking shears
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cotton cloths cut
cotton cloths cut
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melting the wax, resin, and oil together
melting the wax, resin, and oil together
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started using a popsicle stick, but quickly switched to a small paintbrush
started using a popsicle stick, but quickly switched to a small paintbrush
20220305_194002.jpg
finished wraps and jars
finished wraps and jars
20220305_193347.jpg
close-up of jar
close-up of jar
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Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
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Bees wax wraps have been on my to do list for about 2 yrs now. Finally made them! I made sumple version with just bees wax and some cotton fabric I had in my stash.

I learned that if I have a wrap that is 4 layers thick it doesn't seem to matter how much wax I put on - I'm going to have to flip it over and add some more. Maybe someone else has a better method?
20240323_161907.jpg
bees wax pellets on my cotton fabric- I did add a layer of parchment under it
bees wax pellets on my cotton fabric- I did add a layer of parchment under it
20240323_163609.jpg
bees wax that I used
bees wax that I used
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completed food wraps
completed food wraps
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brand new wrap on a glass
brand new wrap on a glass
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Someone approved this submission.

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