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Summary

Paul Wheaton, Fred Tyler, Jennifer Richardson and Josiah Kobernik discuss the missing 'brick' to build a better world, one that may prove to be the foundation stone: How to resolve childhood cancer, and how Paul's projects can help.

Solving childhood cancer in two steps:
Step 1:   Cancer comes from carcinogens. Known and unknown. All people everywhere need to reduce the collective carcinogens in their life by 85%.  
Step 2:   People will not eliminate carcinogens from their life as a sacrifice.  But they will if there is a benefit to themselves. We need to find those benefits and tell everybody.
The same two steps can apply to many global problems, eg climate change.

We need to focus on reaching the 85% of people who have little interest in the environment with benefits that will interest them. This is the mission of wheaton labs. The wofati-greenhouse kickstarter project will be tackling some of these issues. What is the benefit to the world? Reducing energy use. Slowing climate change - truly passive to heat and cool. We eliminate all toxins from the build and reduce embodied energy. Imagine heating and cooling with zero carbon.

How do we get more money into the kickstarter? Why don't more engineers join in with the greenhouse design? 75 different projects have been done on wheaton labs that need more documentation. The biological reverse kickstarter (BRK) incentivises boots to post and document. How do we fill the bootcamp? Greta Thunberg is very popular. If Paul had the same attention, would the planet be moving in a stronger positive direction?

Relevant Threads

the cure for childhood cancer and how my projects can help
the mission
looking for cancer research: cancer rates from 1860 to now
Devious Experiments for a Truly Passive Greenhouse - kickstarter
the first wofati greenhouse design - call out for engineers to brainstorm here!
biological reverse kickstarter
special BRK JUST for the permaculture bootcamp
wheaton-labs permaculture bootcamp

Support the Empire

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To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth
COMMENTS:
 
pioneer
Posts: 135
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I was listening to the podcast and it brought back a few memories. First my father self-published a book years ago and had a lot of difficulty selling his book. He would walk into stores and ask if they would sell his book. I can remember only two places that would. Most would not speak with him or tell him to call so and so. To say it was hard is an understatement. I have read "Building a Better World in your Backyard" and I like it.  The next memory was working at a landscaping place about four years ago. They had three green houses full of plants and other things. During the winter I would come in to water the plants. The big greenhouse was heated by a jet heater at one end and a propane heater at the other. In the day it could get 80 F+ in the greenhouse, which is nice if it is 20 F outside. The job was hard and the pay was bad. About a year after I left the landscaping place one of the owners found out he had cancer and then died about six mouths after. For the record I am a non militant vegan but laughs at jokes about vegans. When I was working with the owner he would say things like " Well my father died of cancer, I will mostly get it and I should eat healthier" or something like "I should eat like what you eat". I love the idea of a Truly Passive Greenhouse and I showed my mother the kickstarter video on youtube and she said that is what the world needs.

Now on to a happy idea. Could a person come to Wheaton Labs say for a week to work on a project? I work a 40 hour day job but I get two weeks of vacation a year. To me it would be fun to come and work on a project as an extra pair of hands. If there is a way to do this how would I go about it?  
 
Mother Tree
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Check out the bootcamp page. I think it has all the info you need.

wheaton labs permaculture bootcamp
 
master steward
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T Blankinship wrote:Now on to a happy idea. Could a person come to Wheaton Labs say for a week to work on a project? I work a 40 hour day job but I get two weeks of vacation a year. To me it would be fun to come and work on a project as an extra pair of hands. If there is a way to do this how would I go about it?  



Either through the bootcamp (so you might be tenting) or through the sepper program (rent a tiny cabin).  In the sepper program you can be in the bootcamp as much or as little as you want.  In the bootcamp, you agree to the work schedule and get food staples.   A sepper can also make experience requests, and sometimes we can steer the bootcamp into those experiences.   And if the sepper works all day in the bootcamp, they can join the bootcamp for three meals.

I very much like the idea of somebody coming out for a week and throwing their shoulder in.
 
T Blankinship
pioneer
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Cool! Sleeping in a tent in the mountains is something I did years ago and I like it. I will look into the sepper and bootcamp. Thank you Burra Maluca for posting the link.
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
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T Blankinship wrote: I will look into the sepper and bootcamp.



Of course, if you support Paul's kickstarter at the $100 level, the $100 gapper fee is waived AND you get all the kickstarter goodies thrown in.  Just sayin'...
 
T Blankinship
pioneer
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Burra Maluca wrote:

Of course, if you support Paul's kickstarter at the $100 level, the $100 gapper fee is waived AND you get all the kickstarter goodies thrown in.  Just sayin'...



I supported the kickstarter at the $150 level and shared the link.
 
pollinator
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I just listened to the podcast while knitting!
I think, that to reduce the carcinogens, you first need to define them ;) which isn't easy and some of them are still debated (like certain foods, for example).

Greta Thunberg is very popular. If Paul had the same attention, would the planet be moving in a stronger positive direction?



I don't think so. She's a lovely, determined and very, very charismatic girl (as your interlocutors noticed - the angry faces!). She decided to target the world leaders, who are mostly unimpressed. Or maybe a little impressed, but not so much to change their "business as usual".
She doesn't really target the rich, but the billionaires could end world's problems pretty soon, without even losing much money. Will they? Probably not. Also, many people don't really know what "the good thing to do" is (see: define the carcinogens). Eat this or that? Fly or take a train? Live in an apartment or move to the countryside? Most people don't even have a choice.
I see many people who try to do something to reduce their carbon footprint while it actually has the opposite effect. I'd tell them to read books about permaculture, but they won't, because they're just not interested. That's the sad part and I think we have to do more to educate them.
 
I am a man of mystery. Mostly because of this tiny ad:
2021 RMH Jamboree planning thread!
https://permies.com/wiki/148835/permaculture-projects/RMH-Jamboree-planning-thread
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