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Ok Permies!  Let's put together a list of permaculture plants that we know work (or don't work) under a juglone producing walnut tree.  Please only list plants that you've had personal experience with, don't repeat a list you saw online somewhere.  I'm hoping this will get at some of the important questions like "Will aronia work under a walnut?"

If your addition to the list is well known, feel free to add it directly to the wiki (if you have access).  If it's a rarer plant, you don't have access to edit the wiki or you think people may have other experiences, please reply to the thread to list you plant(s).  I'll add it to the wiki and then we'll know who to ask if we have questions.

Plants tolerant of juglone:
Trees:
  • Shagbark hickory
  • Paw paw
  • Persimmon
  • Black locust

  • Shrubs:
  • Blackcaps
  • Red currant
  • Jostaberry
  • Autumn olive
  • Elderberry

  • Herbs/etc:
  • Sorrel
  • Stinging nettle
  • Cow parsnip
  • Cupplant
  • Comfrey


  • Plants intolerant of juglone:
    Trees:

  • Shrubs:
  • Aronia

  • Herbs/etc:
  • Russian knapweed
  • COMMENTS:
     
    Posts: 41
    Location: the mountains of western nc
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    regarding your particular important question: at one of our orchards, we planted 100 aronias in many of the halfway points between nut trees (pecans-to-be-grafted-to-hickories and walnuts, all still small enough that there is no noticeable effect from those trees on the aronias). the orchard is surrounded by native trees, including walnuts from 4" to about 2.5' in diameter. we've noticed a strong correlation between an aronia's proximity to any of the larger walnuts and the likelihood of the aronia struggling to grow and in some cases dying. i don't know that i've seen enough to be 100% sure of the cause, but i would tentatively put aronia in the juglone-sensitive group.

    and per that other thread, blackcaps, pawpaws and persimmons in the juglone-tolerant group
     
    master steward
    Posts: 5606
    Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
    1545
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    Thanks Greg!  I did a lot of looking online without much info on aronia and juglone.  Unfortunately I risked it and put a bunch of them near a couple baby butternut trees.  I guess the clock is ticking on them  Thanks for the info!
     
    Posts: 119
    Location: Eastern Ontario
    27
    cattle trees tiny house composting toilet wood heat greening the desert
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    Its definitely NOT a permaculture plant but I can say Russian Knapweed DOES NOT tolerate jungelones.  I have a field being overrun with the stuff.  It kills the grass and the cows wont eat it. I hate it. BUT in same field I have a mature grove of Black Walnuts and not a single RK plant can be seen under them.  Grass grows beautifully thick and lush.  My long term plan to get rid of RK is to plant black and white walnuts, black cherry and black locust as mixed rows  in my fields as silvopasture system.  I find it a bit ironic that while I would never spray roundup or some such in my fields I'll happily use jungalones , another herbicide  albeit a natural one to achieve same end.  I might be a hypocrite but I dont feel bad. lol.

    I cant confirm (yet) but have heard that black locust, black cherry and pawpaw are all unaffected by jungalones.
     
    Posts: 19
    Location: Soggysox Farm east of Houston, TX
    1
    hugelkultur fungi urban
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    Good deal. I have some black walnut...nuts...in my fridge, doin the stratification. I'm thinking I might need more. What's a ballpark density for black walnut in a stand? One every eight feet? I think I'll plug black wall nuts in the soil in an area where I do black locust seed and bare root persimmons. Thanks for the ideas.
     
    Ben Vieux-Rivage
    Posts: 19
    Location: Soggysox Farm east of Houston, TX
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    hugelkultur fungi urban
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    After doing my research, I think that juggalones are misunderstood.

    juggalone.jpg
    [Thumbnail for juggalone.jpg]
     
    Mike Haasl
    master steward
    Posts: 5606
    Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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    Hi Ben, I think the ideal density depends on what you're after.  If you want veneer logs in 60 years, the spacing is probably larger.  If you're wanting maximum nut production in a polyculture it's something different.  In my butternut guild I put 4 seedlings about 4' apart.  I figure in the forest they grow that close and this way if a few die, I didn't waste a 40' area on a tree.  Since I planted them three years ago, two of the four died so it's working out
     
    Mike Haasl
    master steward
    Posts: 5606
    Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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    I just re-watched this Edible Acres video on designing around Black Walnut.  Per Sean's experience, Autumn Olive, pawpaw, black locust, black raspberries, elderberry and comfrey are very tolerant.  Hazelnut, raspberries, persimmon, redbud and chestnut are somewhat tolerant.  They'll live there but not thrive.  

     
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