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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in Foraging.

Foraging is like gardening but without all the planting, weeding, nibbler protection or watering.  If you live in the country there are lots of road sides to search.  This must be wild foods - not gleaning or harvesting from an actively cultivated space.

Plant identification is the most important part of foraging.  Get one or two good books on the edibles of your region.  Be sure you know what you're picking!

To complete this BB, the minimum requirements are:
- one pound (total) of:
      o huckleberries
      o raspberries
      o blueberries
      o aronia
      o salmonberries
      o true cranberries
      o serviceberries
      o sloe berries
      o blackberries (the tiny, trailing variety)
      o strawberries
- two pounds of:
      o blackberries
      o highbush cranberries
      o elderberries
      o grapes
      o chokecherries
      o mulberries
      o sunchokes
      o asparagus
- twenty pounds of:
      o apples
      o pears
      o apricots
      o plums
      o hazelnuts
      o walnuts
      o chestnuts
      o hickory nuts

To document your completion of the BB, provide the following:
 - A picture of one of the plants the berries came from
 - A picture of the bounty on a scale showing the weight (or you have so much, there is no need to weigh it)

Clarifications:
 - The 1 lb list or the 2 lb list can comprise any combination of the berries listed to add up to the required weight (ie one pound of chokecherries and a pound of mulberries satisfies the 2 lb list)
 - Apples from a neighbor don’t count here.  
 - Apples from a homestead that has been abandoned for at least five years does count.  
 - Apples oddly growing in a place where there has never been any cultivation counts too (probably a discarded apple core led to the tree).  
 - Apples that are the result of guerilla gardening do count.

COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
Posts: 128
Location: South Central Kansas
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This tree has the best tasting mulberries of any I have ever had. If anyone would like to point me in the right direction re: collecting mulberry scion wood and grafting, or air-grafting mulberry, I’m all ears. I’ve tried unsuccessfully for 3 or 4 years.

Harvested using the ol’ shake onto a tarp trick.
best-tasting-mulberries.jpeg
best tasting mulberries
best tasting mulberries
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mulberry harvest
mulberry harvest
Staff note (Nicole Alderman):

I certify that this badge bit is complete!

 
master steward
Posts: 13053
Location: Pacific Northwest
5868
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
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It's wild berry season here. I've been picking red hucklberries and blackcap raspberries and the tiny trailing blackberries.  Since there's only so many berries in a given day, I'm taking pictures as I fill buckets, working toward 1 pound

Huckleberries: 9.9 ounces (used the tare button on the electric scale...which promplty ran out of batteries, so the others are taken on the analogue scale)

Blackcaps/blackberries/huckleberries: 12.5-2.5 ounces= 10 ounces

mostly blackcaps and blackberries with some huckleberries: 13.5-2.5 ounces=11 ounces

blackcaps and blackberries=7.5-2.5= 5 ounces

9.9+10+11+5= 35.9 ounces

(16 ounces in a pound. 35.9/16= 2.24 pounds)
20190627_192548-1-.jpg
red huckleberries
red huckleberries
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red huckleberry harvest
red huckleberry harvest
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berry harvest
berry harvest
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berry harvest
berry harvest
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taring vessel
taring vessel
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berry harvest
berry harvest
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wild berry harvest
wild berry harvest
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more wild berries
more wild berries
 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
Posts: 13053
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Fine print is important to read! I found out I needed pictures of the plants, so I got pictures of some of the huckleberry, blackcap raspberry, and blackberry plants that I harvested from.

I also picked another pound of berries yesterday. and then more today (This should make 5 pounds, so I will have met this badge bit four times. Three of those times will go toward the "Big list")

blackcaps and blackberries=15.5-12.5=  3 ounces + 16-2.5=13.5 ounces  = 16.5 ounces

blackcaps and blackberries=15-2.5= 12.5 ounces +  =15.5-2.5= 13 ounces  = 25.5 ounces

Total from all berry picking: 74 ounces = 4.65 pounds
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taring vessel
taring vessel
20190707_192516.jpg
berry harvest
berry harvest
weighing-berry-harvest.jpg
weighing berry harvest
weighing berry harvest
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berry harvest
berry harvest
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blackberries
blackberries
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huckleberries
huckleberries
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blackcaps
blackcaps
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berry harvest
berry harvest
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berry harvest
berry harvest
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[Thumbnail for 20190710_123015-1-.jpg]
Staff note (Mike Haasl):

I certify this BB complete!

 
Posts: 133
Location: Kooskia, ID
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That’s a 3 gallon bucket. Well over 2 pounds of black berries.
blackberry-patch.jpeg
blackberry patch
blackberry patch
blackberries-.jpeg
blackberries!
blackberries!
blackberry-harvest.jpeg
blackberry harvest
blackberry harvest
Staff note (Mike Haasl):

I certify this BB complete!

 
steward
Posts: 7492
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Here's three bags of cleaned and frozen chokecherries weighing in at 17+ lbs.  Picture should've been taken a month ago but it's a chokecherry (one cluster of berries survived and has dried up).

As I read the requirements, I think this qualifies for this BB multiple times (8 times).  So I believe it also qualifies for the Big List item called " - do 4 more items from the fresh list (duplicates are okay)"

Edited to add a pic before the bags were frozen (when I had more).  I've since made wine with some of them.
frozen-chokeberries.jpg
frozen chokeberries
frozen chokeberries
chokeberry-harvest.jpg
chokeberry harvest
chokeberry harvest
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chokeberry patch
chokeberry patch
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chokeberry patch
chokeberry patch
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chokeberry harvest
chokeberry harvest
Staff note (paul wheaton):

I certify this BB as complete.

 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
Posts: 13053
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Finally found my last pictures of berries to meet this badge bit 5 total times. Whew!

These are the big ones. Total of 21.28ounces minus tare of 2.5ounces = 18.78ounces =1.17 pounds. That's 1/2 of meeting this badge. Added to the other berries (of 4.65pounds of the smaller stuff), it gets me, FINALLY up to 5 times!
20190911_183536.jpg
Blackberries tare 2.5oz, weighs 1.33pounds
Blackberries tare 2.5oz, weighs 1.33pounds
20190911_183552.jpg
Himalayan blackberries
Himalayan blackberries
Staff note (Mike Haasl):

I hereby certify you for the 4 additional "fresh" BBs from the Big list

 
pollinator
Posts: 2627
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
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Most of these species listed aren't available locally. Can others be substituted? It is about to be sloe berry season here :D
 
Mike Haasl
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I'm not sure.  I think we'd need Paul to officially weigh in on it since it's Permaculture Experience according to Paul.  

If we had proposals of berries that could be added to the list, along with the suggested amounts, maybe it would be easier for him to say yes or no.  I'm thinking we'd want to say how many fruits you could harvest in a half an hour so that they could be put in the correct section for "minimum requirements".

I'll get it started:
wild blueberries          1 lb
aronia                       1 lb
highbush cranberries  2 lbs
elderberries               2 lbs
tree fruit (apples, pears, oranges)    40 lbs
bog cranberry            1 lb
wild grape                 ? lbs
 
Michael Cox
pollinator
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Sloe berry - 1lb in 30 mins

Sloe berries are found on the blackthorn bush, also known as "Mayflower". It is a fairly common hedgerow plant here, with vicious thorns. The berries are very astringent, but are a great ingredient for syrups and for making sloe gin. They are best harvested after the first hard frost, which is due in a week or so here.
 
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