• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
foraging
instruction, regulation, insurance, safety, etc

This badge is about foraging, hunting, trapping, and fishing... with some forage gardening sprinkled in.  Must be wild foods - not gleaning or harvesting from an actively cultivated space.

Apples from a neighbor don’t count here.   Apples from a homestead that has been abandoned for at least five years do count.  Apples oddly growing in a place where there has never been any cultivation counts too (probably a discarded apple core led to the tree).   Apples that are the result of forage gardening count too.

sand badge

Complete 5 points to get this badge

Required:
(fresh list) harvest one of: - 1/2 point
 - one pound (total) of:
       o huckleberries
       o raspberries
       o blueberries
       o aronia
       o salmonberries
       o true cranberries
       o serviceberries
       o sloe berries
       o blackberries (the tiny, trailing variety)
       o strawberries
 - two pounds of:
       o blackberries
       o highbush cranberries
       o elderberries
       o grapes
       o chokecherries
       o mulberries
       o sunchokes
       o asparagus
- twenty pounds of:
       o apples
       o pears
       o apricots
       o plums
       o hazelnuts
       o walnuts
       o chestnuts
       o hickory nuts

(dry list) harvest, dry, and store one of the following: - 1/2 point
- one pound (fresh weight) of:
      o nettle
      o mint
      o rose hips
      o pineapple weed
- two pounds (fresh weight) of:
      o mushrooms
- twenty pounds (fresh weight) of:
      o apples
      o pears
      o apricots
      o plums

(tea list) make a cup of tea from one of: - 1/2 point
 - nettle
 - rose hips
 - mint
 - pineapple weed

(dish list) prepare a dish (soup, salad, entree, side, etc.) that uses at least a cup of one of: - 1/2 point
 - dandelion (blossoms or leaves)
 - wild mushrooms (must be cooked)
 - nettles
 - miner's lettuce
 - lambs quarter
 - purslane
 - acorns (must be prepared properly)
 - burdock root (must be cooked)
 - chickweed
 - wild sorrel
 - red-root amaranth (pigweed)
 - watercress
 - rose hips

4 pounds of seed balls/bombs  - 1 point
      o at least an inch in diameter
      o can either be used immediately or quickly dried for storage (before the seeds germinate)
      o at least six different species in each ball/bomb
          - possible species:
              o nettle
              o dandelion
              o maple
              o mulberry
              o apples
              o black locust
              o sepp grain
              o daikon radish
              o alfalfa
              o tomato
              o sunflower
              o lupine
              o squash
              o kale
              o turnip
              o cherry

Electives:
Complete two of the following:
 - catch and prepare at least one pound of fish - 1 point
 - catch and prepare one wild rabbit/squirrel - 1 point
 - harvest maple sap and reduce it down to make 1 pint of syrup - 1 point
 - do 2 more items from the dry list (duplicates are okay)  - 1 point
 - do 4 more items from the dish list (duplicates are okay)  - 1 point
 - do 4 more items from the fresh list (duplicates are okay)  - 1 point


straw badge  

35 points required

Harvest at least five plants from the Sand Fresh list - 1/2 point each

Harvest and dry at least three plants from the Sand Dry list - 1/2 point each

Prepare at least eight dishes from the Sand Dish list (at least 5 different species) - 1/2 point each

Prepare 8 dishes (soup, salad, tea, dessert, entree, side, etc.) that feature the things you’ve foraged for other BBs - 4 points

20 pounds of seed balls/bombs - 4 points

Save seeds from 6 species of wild plants - 2 points
    o At least one half teaspoon of each
    o Possible species:
       - Mullein
       - Sweet clover
       - Nettle
       - Apple
       - Apricot
       - Cherry
       - Berries
       - Dandelion
       - Nuts (acorn, hazelnut, walnut, chestnut, etc)
       - Dock/burdock
       - Miners lettuce
       - Sorrels

Sacagawea List (must do at least two)

Catch, butcher and preserve at least five pounds of fish(es) or ten pounds of shellfish - 4 points

Catch, butcher and preserve five wild rabbits/squirrels - 4 points

Catch, butcher and preserve one large mammal (deer, pig, elk, antelope, etc) - 8 points

Catch, butcher and preserve five wild game birds - 4 points

Harvest maple sap and reduce it down to make 1 gallon of syrup - 8 points

Collect 5 pounds of wild honey (without cutting down tree) - 4 points

Guerilla plant 500 woody perennial food seeds or cuttings (not seed bombs) - 8 points
- at least twelve different species
- possible species:
    o apple
    o pear
    o apricot
    o cherry
    o grape
    o mulberry
    o nettle


wood badge

Forage 200,000 calories from at least 10 sources
  - 6 sources of at least 10,000 calories each
        o No more than 4 of the 6 can be animal sources
        o For reference, the following have approximately 10,000 calories:
           o 14 lbs of venison
           o 17 lbs of duck
           o 15 lbs of trout
           o 42 lbs of apples
           o 100 lbs of morels
           o 30 lbs of sunchokes
           o 3 quarts of maple syrup
  - at least half of the calories need to be dried for storage that could last more than a year at room temp - possible twofer with Food Prep and Preservation
        o can include
           o charcuterie
           o smoking
  - at least 10% is canned - possible twofer with Food Prep and Preservation

10 days eating 90% foraged food
   o 90% by calories
   o More than 6 foraged food types per day
   o Can include preserved foraged foods
   o Don’t have to be consecutive days
   o Minimum 1200 calories per day

1 mile of trail side forage gardening
   o 1 living plant per 10 feet of trail on average (so more than 500 plants)
   o within 20 feet of the trail
   o at least six different species
   o can be roadside, for rarely used dirt roads
   o the mile can be spread out between multiple stretches of trail
   o video of trail when introducing seed balls, and a general idea of what edibles were there to start
   o video of trail for several harvests and showing what plants made it
   o harvest 1000 calories each from six different species (can be from existing plants along the mile)
   o show at least 100 fruit trees at least four inches tall
   o harvest at least 10,000 calories total (can go towards the 200,000 calorie BB)

iron badge

Forage 1,600,000 calories from at least 20 sources
  - 12 sources of at least 20,000 calories each
      o No more than 8 of the 12 can be animal sources

90 days eating 90% foraged food
   o 90% by calories
   o More than 6 foraged food types per day
   o Can include preserved foraged foods
   o One 30 day stretch
   o Four 7 day stretches
   o Minimum 1200 calories per day

1 mile of trail side forage gardening
   o 1 living plant per 1 foot of trail on average (so more than 5000 plants)
   o within 40 feet of the trail
   o at least twelve different species
   o can be roadside, for rarely used dirt roads
   o the mile can be spread out between multiple stretches of trail
   o video of trail when introducing seed balls, and a general idea of what edibles were there to start
   o video of trail for several harvests and showing what plants made it
   o harvest 5,000 calories each from six different species
   o show at least 100 fruit trees at least five feet tall
   o harvest at least 50,000 calories total (can go towards the 1,600,000 calorie BB)
COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
Posts: 204
Location: Gulf Islands, Canada
66
hugelkultur cat books medical herbs homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This looks awesome! At least some of the plants in each list are available where I live so I would be able to complete this badge. I'd probably lean pretty heavily on the dry/dish/fresh lists because I don't have access to enough maple trees to make syrup and I don't know how to fish/trap yet (and can't really trap at home right now, which is semirural). I feel like it's more difficult to trap and prepare a squirrel than to collect 4lb of berries but that might be a function of my location or my background.
 
Posts: 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in Hawaii on the Big Island.  We don't have almost any of these things here.  What can we do for substitutes?
 
Posts: 95
Location: NE Oklahoma
13
monies dog forest garden fungi foraging hunting books bee solar rocket stoves homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Maybe it's just me, but I feel that hunting fishing and trapping are completely separate activities from foraging.  These are broad enough categories that they deserve their own badges.  
 
master steward
Posts: 8717
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2512
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry I didn't see the comments on this thread earlier...

Meg, it should only take one maple tree to make a pint of syrup.  Other trees are also allowed that make syrup if you have them handy (box elder, walnut, birch, etc)

John, since it's the PEP program (Permaculture Experience according to Paul) it is oriented towards the flora, fauna, equipment, climate and style of Paul and his site in Montana.  Someday someone in Hawaii or the Caribbean will come up with a PEX for that sort of climate and you'll be all set.

Vernon, I was thinking along the same lines as you at first.  But then I realized that the idea is to get food from from things that you don't cultivate.  IE there's a gardening badge and an animal care badge for things you tend.  This one covers plants and animals that you can collect in the wild.  Sure, they could be separated but I'm guessing for Paul's systems, it makes more sense to keep them together.  Another way of saying it is that for areas with lots of wild game (or PEX authors that put more weight on hunting), it could make sense to have a separate foraging and hunting badge.

I hope this sheds some more light on the subject...
 
Vernon Inverness
Posts: 95
Location: NE Oklahoma
13
monies dog forest garden fungi foraging hunting books bee solar rocket stoves homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Jay wrote:
Vernon, I was thinking along the same lines as you at first.  But then I realized that the idea is to get food from from things that you don't cultivate.  IE there's a gardening badge and an animal care badge for things you tend.  This one covers plants and animals that you can collect in the wild.  Sure, they could be separated but I'm guessing for Paul's systems, it makes more sense to keep them together.  Another way of saying it is that for areas with lots of wild game (or PEX authors that put more weight on hunting), it could make sense to have a separate foraging and hunting badge.

I hope this sheds some more light on the subject...



It does, indeed.  Thanks for the perspective, Mike!
 
gardener
Posts: 842
Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
56
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

if not already in the works...

I would like so see a badge for people who....

collect berries, fruit, and nuts
then save some the seeds
or thin out overgrown clumps
or take cuttings
and the plant them out
to increase the foraging opportunities for others

foraging shouldn't be a parasitic activity

I seem to recall
I think in one of the early permaculture books
that hunter/gatherers planted/cared for 80%+ of their foraging
 
master steward
Posts: 14314
Location: Pacific Northwest
6482
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Jay wrote:
John, since it's the PEP program (Permaculture Experience according to Paul) it is oriented towards the flora, fauna, equipment, climate and style of Paul and his site in Montana.  Someday someone in Hawaii or the Caribbean will come up with a PEX for that sort of climate and you'll be all set.



While I do understand this reasoning, I do wonder if PEX or PEA or whatever would get someone a spiffy badge in their profile? I really like having the badge, and I'm rather privileged to be in a place that grows many of the same foods as Montana, so I'm able to earn this badge. So, I really feel for those that are far away, and so can't easily get this badge, and I do wish it were more inclusive to other areas. Maybe, in the future, it will be. I think that would be lovely.
 
Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 8717
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2512
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I believe I've completed all the BBs to achieve the sand badge!
Fresh list
Dry list
Tea list
Dish list
Catch/prepare a fish
Make maple syrup
Do four more items from the fresh list (duplicates are ok)
 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
Posts: 14314
Location: Pacific Northwest
6482
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well earned and deserved, Mike! I hereby grant you the sand badge! You have bested me once again! Will I be able to catch up? I don't know!
 
Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 8717
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2512
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The Straw, Wood and Iron badges have been added in to the list at the top of the thread.  
 
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Love this idea. A couple species suggestions for midwest folks.


Plaintain, narrow or broad leaf (plantago spp)
Harvest 2lbs (very similar to dandelion)
Suitable for tea (very bitter, very good for you  like dandelion leaf)
Seed gathering, after grinding and drying narrow plantain is a suitable replacement for psyllium husk which is a common binder used in gluten free bread baking (psyllium is plantago ovata)

Jerusalem artichoke aka sunchoke (helianthus tuberosus)
Harvest 5lbs, be VERY VERY careful harvesting near a road as it is an efficient toxin and lead accumulator

White, red and crimson clover (trifolia spp)
While greens are suitable for salads we only do a little
Harvest flower 1lb (maybe less they don't have much weight) a very nice sweet addition to salads the fresher the sweeter, you will see why bees swarm these.
Tea flower, red is especially good for the micro nutrients and the flowers are often golf ball sized so you only need 4 to 5  for a cup of tea, suitable dried or fresh.
Dried flower not sure the appropriate number but this is an excellent method to preserve for tea.

Black walnut  juglans nigra
Harvest 10 lbs (shelled)
Chestnuts
Harvest 10lbs (shelled)
Hickory
Harvest 10 lbs (shelled)
I mainly suggest the walnut and chestnut because they are Very common in city parks around here because they were left as shade trees. I personally consider them forage because they are not cultured for production and public parks are about as wild as you get for apartment dwellers and metro city dwellers. Plus there is no small effort to shell 10 lbs of nuts, as a tip use a c clamp that screws down to crack the shell without obliterating the nut meat.


 
Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 8717
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2512
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks David, great list!  I'll check with Paul on them.  Generally he's trying to stay with things that can be foraged in Montana, since it's Permaculture Experience according to Paul.  But we've let some widely/commonly distributed plants in the list.  I can't believe we missed sunchokes, they're one of Paul's favorite plants.

I'm also not sure about the park.  I think that might count as a cultivated space per the second paragraph of the post:

Apples from a neighbor don’t count here.   Apples from a homestead that has been abandoned for at least five years does count.  Apples oddly growing in a place where there has never been any cultivation counts too (probably a discarded apple core led to the tree).   Apples that are the result of guerilla gardening count too.  



So if someone guerilla planted the nut trees in a wooded part of the park, it would be fine.  If the city planted them and they're surrounded by questionably maintained turf grass, I'm thinking they don't count (for this badge).

Hope that makes sense?
 
David Pritchett
Posts: 22
5
kids fungi urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Haasl wrote:

So if someone guerilla planted the nut trees in a wooded part of the park, it would be fine.  If the city planted them and they're surrounded by questionably maintained turf grass, I'm thinking they don't count (for this badge).

Hope that makes sense?



Seems reasonable to me. The areas I'm think of are generally more of areas where the forest has been cut away from trees, but there are often some areas where there are strips of forest with paved areas run through them. I'm local to st louis and I'm personally thinking of laumeier sculpture park and queeny park for any curious. Loving this and when the mushrooms start to fruit around here I'll begin putting in my submissions!
 
gardener
Posts: 1196
Location: Denver, 6a / BSk, rental house dweller, going back to Wheaton Labs soon
719
hugelkultur kids forest garden trees books wofati cooking bike rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Mike, I see where points have been added to the Sand level BB's but I'm not seeing the required number of points to get the Sand Badge.

Is it a 5 point badge like other Sand badges that have points?
 
Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 8717
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2512
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good question!  We put the points in there so that people could repeat them for Straw (and their complexity varied so we needed to list out the points).  But no, we don't need to say Sand = 5 points for that one since the Required and Elective things clearly say how much to do of each.
 
pollinator
Posts: 468
Location: zone 4b, sandy, Continental D
127
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

duane hennon wrote:
.....
foraging shouldn't be a parasitic activity ....




I'm so with you on this one, Duane. Indeed, foraging shouldn't be a parasitic activity ....
I feel that there is a rather blurred line between things we plant and harvest and things we allow to thrive only to harvest some of them later. I tended to some wild mulberry seeds that I found. Now, I have 26 mulberry bushes and trees. Is that planting or wild foraging? I also have a couple of pear grown from pips and I managed to transplant some wild asparagus in my hubby's shooting berm. Because they have access to a lot of pretty good dirt, the spears are enormous!, bigger than my regular asparagus, which I planted and tended to. We should not *just* take from Mother Nature. Sometimes, we should replenish to make up for what we take. Similarly, I have some stinging nettles that were a chance happening, but I try to make sure they keep coming year after year, even though they are annoying in the bed of flowers I planted.
Idem the juneberries that grow wild: I remove the brambles that try to smother them and even give them a little comfrey juice. I do not mow the sweet fern: The dried ferns give me a spice similar to sage for free.
We arrange our space with a mix of plants, some we buy and tend to, some we 'discover' and tend to. But to keep enjoying them, we must "tend to" what we value.
 
Posts: 19
Location: Joint Base MDL, New Jersey
12
forest garden gear tiny house building woodworking ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is Elaeagnus multiflora, the cherry elaeagnus, cherry silverberry, goumi, gumi, or natsugumi, native to Montana? 8 years ago I first read about this wonderful shrub. Now I see it next to parking lots and next to most contry roads and hiking trails. They seem  to be cold tolerant enough for Montana, and also spreads quickly via bird dropping.
 
Posts: 5
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Acorns don't seem to be in either of the harvest lists? They're in a few other BBs, and they grow everywhere. I probably wouldn't have noticed this if I didn't go out intending to collect apples, pears, and grapes from a century old homestead and get distracted by the abundance of acorns yesterday :P
 
Every snowflake is perfect and unique. And every snowflake contains a very tiny ad.
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic