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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in textiles.

In this project, you will make a small pillowcase.

To complete this Badge Bit, you must:
  -  Post a before picture of your fabric
  -  Post a picture of your pillow in progress
  -  Post a picture of you stuffing your pillow
  -  Post a picture of your completed pillow!

Requirements:
  - Must be stuffed with a natural material: bedstraw, straw, feathers or wool
  - Fabric must be either reclaimed from an old tee-shirt/sheet, or be a natural material (hemp, cotton, wool, linen, silk, etc)
  - Be at least 10x10 inches
  - It can be machine sewn, as you can probably already sew by hand if you can use a sewing machine!

Here's a quick video on sewing a pillow



If you've never sewn before, I have a more in-depth tutorial down below!

Here's a tutorial on how to sew!

Step
1

Measure and Cut the Fabric



Generally, it is useful to first WASH the fabric, as it will shrink when washed. Though, if you're never planning on washing your pillow, this isn't really necessary. And, if it's an old tee-shirt or sheet you're re-purposing, you don't need to wash it, either.

Once the fabric is washed and dried, you'll want to iron it flat (not as necessary in a little pillow, but it's a good thing to get in the process of doing when sewing most anything)

Now lay it on a flat, preferably smooth surface and measure and cut it.



If you don't have the fancy clear ruler and slicy-thingy, no worries! Use any sort of straight edge to draw the line you'll cut. Find the sharpest pair of scissors you have, and cut on the line! (You can also buy a brand new pair of scissors and devote them soley to fabric so they stay sharp. Threaten your family with dire consequences if they use your precious fabric scissors for anything that's not fabric. Hide the scissors from them, too, if need be!)



Step
2

Pin the Fabric and Thread the Needle



Pin the pieces of fabric together



Thread the Needle


Tie a knot at the end of the needle





Step
3

Sew It



You might want to use a pencil and draw a line 1/2 inch from the edge of your fabric. This is where you'll sew. Make sure to NOT sew the whole pillow. Leave a gap to turn the thing right side out, and to stuff it.

You can Either sew it with a running stitch



or the back stitch. The back stitch is a bit more secure.





Step
4

Turn the Fabric Right-Side Out and Stuff It



Reach your finger through the hole you left, and grab some fabric and pull it through the hole. Just like when you turn your pants right side out.

Shove your stuffing through the hole. Push the stuffing into the corners first, then keep putting more stuffing in. And more stuffing. And even more. Because it will compress.





Step
5

Sew the hole shut!



For this, you need a blind stitch



COMMENTS:
 
master steward
Posts: 11383
Location: Pacific Northwest
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hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
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Finally got a chance to make my pillow! I used an old dress shirt and knit shirt (two layers in hopes that it would keep the feathers from poking out), and stuffed with wool and duck feathers that I picked up from my duck house. I tried to surround the feathers with wool so that they had a harder time poking out.
20190708_123600-1-.jpg
old shirt for fabric
old shirt for fabric
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shirt for fabric
shirt for fabric
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sewing a pillow
sewing a pillow
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pillow ingredients
pillow ingredients
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stuffing home made pillow
stuffing home made pillow
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sewing up home made pillow
sewing up home made pillow
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home made pillow
home made pillow
Staff note (r ranson):

"I certify this badge bit is complete."

 
master steward & author
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Location: Left Coast Canada
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I dug through the GoodWill pile and found this old skirt with some lovely twill fabric.

I had some wool that is too fragile to make into yarn, so I lightly carded it for the filling.  If I used the wool as it is, I would have lumpy filling which makes for a lumpy pillow.  
twill-skirt-for-pillow-fabric.jpg
twill skirt for pillow fabric
twill skirt for pillow fabric
IMG_7177.JPG
pillow fabric
pillow fabric
IMG_7178.JPG
making a pillow
making a pillow
carding-wool-for-pillow-filling.jpg
carding wool for pillow filling
carding wool for pillow filling
sewing-up-pillow.jpg
sewing up pillow
sewing up pillow
IMG_7203.JPG
home made pillow
home made pillow
Staff note (Nicole Alderman):

I hereby certify that this Badge Bit is complete!!! (And looks very nice, and very soft!)

 
steward
Posts: 5059
1989
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I used a t-shirt that I found on the Free Shelf at Basecamp.



This a progress picture of me working on my pillow.



This is before I turned it inside out.



This is after I turned it inside out.



This is while I stuffed the pillow.



This is after I finished the pillow.

Staff note (Nicole Alderman):

I certify that this badge bit is complete!

 
pollinator
Posts: 1038
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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I made this small pillow of reclaimed cotton duvet cover material. It isn't square, but round, I hope that counts too.

the fabric


cutting the round shape with the help of a glass plate


pinning


stitched with the sewing machine, left a part open


filling with wool


closing the opening with overhand stitches


finished!  

 
Nicole Alderman
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Location: Pacific Northwest
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Inge, any chance you can measure it?

I'm thinking that if it clearly uses the same amount of stitches around, it would be really easy to certify. So, if a square pillow that's 10x10 has 40inches perimeter, a round pillow that's has the same amount of inches in circumference would be easy one to certify. I divided a circumference of 40 by pi to find out that a pillow with a diameter of 12.7 inches (32 centimeters), would have the same amount of stitches as a 10x10 pillow.

That's a lot of math! Basically, if your pillow is 32 cm across, I can easily certify it. If not, then I'll have to ask the higher-ups to weigh in.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
pollinator
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Inge, any chance you can measure it?

I'm thinking that if it clearly uses the same amount of stitches around, it would be really easy to certify. So, if a square pillow that's 10x10 has 40inches perimeter, a round pillow that's has the same amount of inches in circumference would be easy one to certify. I divided a circumference of 40 by pi to find out that a pillow with a diameter of 12.7 inches (32 centimeters), would have the same amount of stitches as a 10x10 pillow.

That's a lot of math! Basically, if your pillow is 32 cm across, I can easily certify it. If not, then I'll have to ask the higher-ups to weigh in.


Nicole, in that case this pillow is too small. No BB for this one.
Never mind. I will make another one. A square pillow of the right size, probaby made of an old T-shirt, like the others did. I can use such a pillow in one of my pillow covers.
 
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Location: PNW zone 8b
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It is still raining in the PNW so on to making a small pillow.  My son ripped out his jeans which are cotton so I am using them as my fabric. The wool is from the Black Sheep festival from 10 years ago when I thought I would learn to spin. I broke 1 machine needle and remembered why thimbles are so important to hand sewing. Starting to do some BBs in nesting and textiles reminds me that these skills are just as important as tool care and woodland care and that I am rusty.
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torn jeans
torn jeans
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wool
wool
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stuffing
stuffing
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measurement
measurement
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done
done
Staff note (Nicole Alderman):

I hereby certify that this badge bit is complete!

 
Seriously? That's what you're going with? I prefer this tiny ad:
A rocket mass heater heats your home with one tenth the wood of a conventional wood stove
http://woodheat.net
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