Woodmyst Hatfield

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since Feb 08, 2011
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Recent posts by Woodmyst Hatfield

Brenda Groth wrote:
there used to be a lot more barter systems around here in the 60's and early 70's then there are at this period of time..

I remember we used to barter goods and services a lot when Ron and I were first married..and even before during my parents time when we were growing up..like paying the dr for medical care with produce.

I agree that it would be good if these systems could come back again..as a more common form of economics..and I think it will.

we do still see small forms  of it from time to time..such as..this past summer my son traded work on his tractor for a few hours of backhoe use, dirt and diesel fuel that was left over after they were done renting the backhoe..

all he provided was his time and our tractor..to move dirt..and we were given 3 hours of backhoe time, 6 5 gallon cans of diesel fuel and tons of dirt.

by allowing the use of my foley food mill to the neighbor ..we got a jar of applesauce homade..sure a small barter but nonetheless it was a trade of goods..

often people trade day care for services..or goods.

we often trade car repairs for services..

i would be blessed to see this increase in popularity



  Given the present economy we may see a lot more of it, I hope.
9 years ago
Wow! That's cool.  I'd like to see more States take a stance like that.  Instead of holding women and children at gunpoint for selling raw milk or organic meats!
9 years ago
Misfit: We also have the out of state bottle problem.  But there are recycling centers for other materials and I have to say MOST MI residents take them there instead.  We also have the machines that read the barcode and if it has a deposit I think the barcode is slightly different and the machine won't take it if it's not ours. I sort of think bottle deposit should be nationwide.  The same deposit across the board accepted in any state i.e. a returnable coke bottle in TX will still be a returnable coke bottle in MI.  5 cents is an ok deposit but at 10 cents, believe me, people pick them up!  That is exactly what the law intended.  It's nice to see that lawmakers can actually come up with something that works once in a while.
9 years ago

Bubblingbrooks wrote:
Ours get full grass and forage as well. The $10 per bird in grain, is because we live in Alaska, and our prices are higher 
We feed local bulk barley, BOSS and fishmeal.



  You are probably shorter on time up there too.  I mean with the growing season being short you probably gotta get 'er done!  Most of the grain fed chix here are ready to process in about 8 weeks.  Mine go 12 or when I think they're fat enough! LOL!
9 years ago
Those are cute for camping but I don't think it will throw much heat.  So far in my trailer , I'm running an Edenpure electric and another small 1500 watter.  Electric is cheaper than gas right now but I too am looking for an off the grid solution.
9 years ago
Here we go together like a co-op and puchase the birds.  Split the cost of raising and processing.  Ours have to be taken to the processer live.  We found an amish guy that processes them for 3 bucks a bird. Freezer ready.  get a straight run of meat birds at 99 cents each, pasture feed with minimal supplementation.  ends up about 5-6 bucks a bird.  Around the same if not better than the store and we know where they came from (just sayin').
9 years ago
You could gather up the different kinds of pinecones and rinse them off and dry them on a cookie sheet in a 150 degree oven for about an hour to an hour and a half. they open up and the pine sap provides kind of a shellac and makes them shiny.  When you go to use them for craft projects they look nice and aren't all sticky.  You can make wreaths, or potpourri or ornaments or sell them to crafters.
9 years ago
Brenda,
  How lucky are we to live in MI!  A law was passed recently allowing small scale production of certain food items from home without a business license or certification.  They have to be non- hazardous foods like jams, jellies, breads, pies, rolls, cookies and cakes.  I too live about an hour from the world's cherry capital.  I purchased 2.2 acres in July of 2009 and I am looking to clear part of it and plant berries and fruit as well.  The goods you can make can be sold at roadside stands, farmer's markets or you can take orders for them but cannot be sold through a retail store without a business license or kitchen certification.  It is a way for people to "test drive" whether or not the want to go into a full blown business.  Where I'm at, some of the seasonal produce markets will buy your produce from you as well.  In the spring I sometimes sell my extra morels from my mushroom hunts and rhubarb, asparagus, strawberries.  I make less than if I sold them retail myself but at least they aren't wasted.  With the new law I may be able to sell the berries, the jam and a few baked goods.  It's amazing how lazy some of the city folk really are.  You can really clean up!
9 years ago
Wow!  What next?  Hey YOU!  You're breathing too much air!
9 years ago
  Just a story.  My Dad's Dad walked out on my Grandmother and him when he was 3.  Being the late 1930's, women didn't necessarily work outside the home which made it impossible for my Grandma to care for him so he ended up in the Foster Care system and was placed with a Family on a farm.  He grew up tending the fields and caring for the animals until my Grandma remarried and he was returned to his new home which was a ....FARM!  My Dad was very fond of Esther and she visited often.  I knew her as my "Aunt" growing up, I didn't know all the details until much later.  One afternoon my Dad wanted us to "take a ride" with him so we all piled in the car and 4 hour drive later we were pulled over on a country road, and my Dad got out of the car and just stood at the side of the road for the longest time looking at this huge farm.  I asked why we were there and my Mother told me this was Esther's place, where Dad grew up.  The farm had been sold years earlier and Esther had passed away, Dad hadn't been back there in over 20 years, but it was still a very big part of who he was.  My Dad was a great man.  Honest hard working father of 6.  I don't know how he would have turned out if he had been placed in an orphanage or a city home.  Thank God for Esther.  Living the country life CAN make a difference.
9 years ago