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Ferne Reid

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since May 09, 2008
SW Tennessee Zone 7a average rainfall 52"
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Recent posts by Ferne Reid

Since my Wonderwood turned out to be less than a wonder ...

I'm heating a 300 sq. ft. tiny house in southwest Tennessee. Our coldest nighttime temps generally hit the mid-teens and our heating season runs from mid-October through the end of February, although on many of those days I only need a fire at night. Obviously I'd like to get away with as little money as possible, but I don't want a stove that is so cheap as to be inefficient and a pain to deal with.

What should I buy?

*Edited to add that I love the idea of an RMH but don't have the ability to build one. I need something I can purchase ready to install*
4 months ago
Thanks, guys. Guess I'm going shopping.
4 months ago
Hi all,

First I want to say that I am NOT new to heating with wood. I understand air flow and dampers and the importance of decent wood and a clean chimney and all that stuff.

I was gifted a Wonderwood stove that had been sitting out in the back of someone's property for years. IOW the electric thermostat mechanism is trashed and I don't have sufficient power to run it here in any case. I've researched the stove online but haven't found any answers to my problem.

The fire is not getting enough air. I can get a hot fire going, but unless I leave the door cracked open (obviously not an ideal situation) it fizzles down to glowing coals and not much heat before long. Yes, my chimney is clean. Yes, I am burning aged dry hardwood.

Ideas from those who have experience with this stove are appreciated.
4 months ago
Thank you! I had read somewhere that sealer is only effective if the concrete is new. I'm glad to hear that's not the case! This is why I come here ... you guys know everything.
8 months ago
I am converting a room in my large barn (probably intended to be a feed/tack room) into living space. The walls are concrete block and the floor is what seems to be poured concrete with various sized pebbles/rock embedded in it. I have insulated and finished off the walls. I'm having trouble with the floor.

Whatever one is supposed to do to keep moisture from coming up through the concrete, the original builder did not do it. The floor is always damp. Anything on the floor (rugs, dog bed, etc.) will quickly grow mildew under it if not taken up often to air it out. Let's not talk about what's going on with my sofa.

Is there anything a woman alone on a small fixed income can do about this, or do I just resign myself to dismantling my house every other day to air things out? Thanks in advance for your help!
8 months ago
Hi all,

I'm turning a concrete walled room in my barn into a tiny home. I need to insulate the walls. Since I probably won't have help, I've decided that the easiest thing to do is to use the foam panels that are available at Lowes and put it all together with construction adhesive. Can I put the foam right up against the concrete, or do I need to create a space?

I don't really know what I'm doing with this project, so any tips or tricks would be appreciated!
1 year ago
We're trying to reclaim a section of poor, overgrazed pasture. The dog fennel (Eupatorium capillifolium) is taking over the world! For one brief second, the Roundup looked pretty good ... no, I'm not actually going to do that, but I'm getting desperate. Any ideas?
2 years ago
Check out Sugar Mountain Farm

Walter lives in Vermont, so his climate is different, but he is more than willing to answer questions. He has a LOT of blog posts on the basics of what he does, and he's very successful at it. He's a member here, but I don't know how often he gets on here anymore. He and his family are good people. Best dog I've ever had came from Sugar Mountain Farm.
2 years ago
Temperament is a complex thing, which is why I said i was guessing. Not at all surprised that I got some things wrong.

People change when it becomes too uncomfortable to stay the same. As dysfunctional as it is for you, your relationship is working for him. If it weren't, he'd do something different.

So what about this is working for him? Can you set some boundaries so it doesn't work?
2 years ago
For what this is worth ... I'm a Christian counselor, and I do something called temperament therapy. Most people have never heard of it. In my almost 10 years of experience, I've discovered that many of these types of conflicts are due to the fact that you and your spouse are wired differently.

I am GUESSING at your spouse's temperament based on what you've said ... but I'm guessing he's the type who does not feel comfortable doing something he isn't sure how to do, he doesn't like to feel controlled, he's a perfectionist, and he is not motivated by punishment or reward.

I am GUESSING that you are a git 'er done kind of girl, that you tend to just jump in and figure it out, that you are more interested in having it done than having it perfect, and that you also do not like to feel controlled.

The cool thing is that marriages between people with different temperaments can actually work really well ... as long as you can resist the urge to kill each other. That's because you each have strengths that the other doesn't have. The key is to learn to work with them rather than fighting them.

If you'd like to know more, feel free to pm me.
2 years ago