Crystal Stevens

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since Jul 09, 2020
Crystal Stevens lives along the bluffs of the Mighty Mississippi River in Godfrey, Ilinois with her husband, and 2 children. Stevens is an Author, an Artist/Art Teacher, a Folk Herbalist, a Regenerative Farmer, and a Permaculturist. Stevens has written 3 books published by New Society Publishers: Grow Create Inspire, Worms at Work, and Your Edible Yard. Stevens speaks at conferences and Mother Earth News Fairs across the United States. She has been teaching a Resilient Living workshop series for over a decade. She and her husband, Eric Stevens, co-founded FLOURISH which encompasses a farm, a plant nursery, an apothecary, design services and educational programming including a Permaculture Design Course, and dozens of workshops throughout each season. Stevens Co-founded Tend & Flourish School of Botanicals with Alex Queathem.
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Recent posts by Crystal Stevens

Crystal Stevens wrote:

Dk Jacob wrote:Hey there, great to be published, yes?  Do you have any recommendations for winning against gophers? When I have a fairly large garden, I don't think I can be lining every planting hole with wire to keep them out.  What to do?  Thanks,  DKJ


We have not had experience with gophers so I really don’t have a good answer for you, unfortunately. A friend of ours used to rent an ozone generator to deter large pests. Not sure if that is helpful or not. Thank you.



I did find this:)
https://www.installitdirect.com/learn/how-to-get-rid-of-gophers/

Dk Jacob wrote:Hey there, great to be published, yes?  Do you have any recommendations for winning against gophers? When I have a fairly large garden, I don't think I can be lining every planting hole with wire to keep them out.  What to do?  Thanks,  DKJ


We have not had experience with gophers so I really don’t have a good answer for you, unfortunately. A friend of ours used to rent an ozone generator to deter large pests. Not sure if that is helpful or not. Thank you.

Pavel Mikoloski wrote:Welcome Crystal:

I am a newbie to gardening and I love the idea of edibles everywhere!

My question is that I like a bit of orderliness and beauty in the garden and if you put edibles in the yard, doesn't that make it look a bit ugly?

How do you maintain a sense of beauty with edibles in the yard?

All the Best,

Paul M.



In my opinion, perennials make the best edible landscape plants and I find them to be very beautiful.

We have found that sneaking edibles in to an ornamental looking landscape works well.
Some ideas:
Serviceberry tree inter planted with Aron is, elderberry, gooseberry, currant, perennial arugula, medicinal herbs, flowers, culinary herbs, kale, rainbow chard, and alpine strawberries as a nice edible border:)

Best of luck!

Mary Allen wrote:After living for many decades on acreage and being able to plant when and where I like, I have now moved to a quarter-acre corner lot in a Home Owners Association that has lots of rules for how yards are to look and be cared for. There is nothing prohibiting edibles, but it is important that I keep a neat and orderly appearance in the large front yard.

I have been dealing with the front yard lawn for a few months and am already tired of it; I want to put my energy into food production. Because I am on a corner lot, there are height restrictions close to the street to be sure visibility is maintained for traffic.

I prefer perennials. Small trees would also work. I am blessed to live in Oregon, 7b climate, so a wide variety of plants do thrive here. In my backyard I've started an asparagus patch, Marion-berries, raspberries, several dwarf fruit trees, blueberries, figs and ten raised beds for veggies and strawberries. I planted squash and pumpkins on a side yard, which they are filling up and started artichokes since the ones belonging to my neighbors are wildly productive.

The main section of the front yard faces west, so not much morning sun, but loads of afternoon sun. There is a large tree to one side where I plan to plant some shade-loving wintergreen. It is the main area, sunny and in plain view where I would like to do something attractive and productive. Also, because this is a manufactured home, the insulation is not as good as I am used to, so I would like to use plants along the west side of the house to moderate the afternoon sun during our few months of warm weather. At least six months of the year we have lots of rain and usually a few freezing days mid-winter.

I would appreciate suggestions for how gardeners have incorporated beauty and production into a cohesive, low maintenance, foodscape that can replace most or all of the lawn.

Happy Gardening,
Mary Allen



We have found that sneaking edibles in to an ornamental looking landscape works well.
Some ideas:
Serviceberry tree inter planted with Aron is, elderberry, gooseberry, currant, perennial arugula, medicinal herbs, flowers, culinary herbs, kale, rainbow chard, and alpine strawberries as a nice edible border:)

Samantha Hall wrote:I don't know what I was thinking....or not thinking.

Of course! Ashland has a great book store that will either be carrying it or can get it for me

Thank you!!!


Hi Samantha! Thank you so much for your interest on my book.
I sell the books directly on my website:

shop.growcreateinspire.com

www.growcreateinspire.com
Thank you!
-Crystal Stevens

William Schlegel wrote:My son is now three years old. Professionally my wife and I have both worked as essentially gardeners in some of our past employ.

I do garden with the little guy and such things as berry picking both in the yard and out and about. He really enjoyed double digging a bed with me last fall.

However, we do struggle to get things done with him around. As he gets older we expect eventually this will all get easier.

Do you garden with small children? How's it working out?


We ran a 200 member CSA for 7 years with kids in tow. It was stressful and exhausting during long workdays when They were younger but now that they are older, they are very helpful- especially our 8 year old.
Unfortunately, we didn’t have the best greens year! Fortunately, our blackberries are prolific!

Eleonora Matarrese wrote:Hi Crystal, and welcome on permies! Amazing cover, I really would like to discover your suggestions! Do you also explain how to use wild plants in your yard/veg garden? Thanks a lot in advance!


There is a full chapter on wild edibles.
They are for zone 6-8. What zone are you in?

Michelle Heath wrote:Welcome Crystal!  Looking forward to reading your book.


Thank you!

K.W. Smith wrote:Hello Crystal, welcome and congrats on the book! It looks to be very interesting and I'll look forward to reading it. I'm very interested in getting proficient in
wild edible identification as well as innovating gardening ideas. I'm a green noob to all of this but view every day as a new classroom.
Cheers!

Kevin


Thank you so much!