Andrea Arens

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since Jul 08, 2019
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Recent posts by Andrea Arens

I’m looking for a home grown treatment for peach leaf curl on my nectarine. The tree is about 3 years old and only about 7 leaves survived this year. I tried spraying garlic concentrate last fall and early this spring but maybe it was just too rainy.

I was just reading an article about horsetail being a good fungicide for peach curl, and then also thyme oil apparently works on fungus too. So I was wondering if anyone has experience using any of these for peach leaf curl…or a combination? I’m thinking of making a batch of horsetail and thyme tea and then adding the garlic and letting it sit overnight. Is this overkill? Will they cancel each other out? Will this work on rust spots on my pear too? Thyme is also an insecticide so should I omit the thyme? I also have soapwort, would that help?

Any advice is appreciated! Thanks
1 month ago
Before I even finished reading your post my thoughts were that there was something allelopathic nearby! I just had to move my baby pecan tree to the other side of my property because I just read an article that says apples are particularly sensitive to juglone. My bet is that this is your problem, if it were me, I would actually leave the apple tree there and dig up the roots from the hickory leading up to the apple tree. I think as the roots decay they release the hormones into the soil even more than when they are alive. So I think this unlucky apple tree just went in too close to a root.

I have a 30ft tall ‘wall’ of laurels on my back property line and I have to be careful when I plant things for this very reason because I’ve found their roots going more that 20ft away so far! If only I could afford to have them removed lol.

Also on a similar side note….lilacs are ALSO allelopathic. In case you didn’t know… I didn’t. I also have a ‘wall’ of lilacs on the side of my property that must be about 50-60 years old, as they are as tall as my laurels. (Pawpaws are NOT sensitive to juglone, if you want to try something different lol)
1 month ago
    Hello, I have a shade greenhouse here in zone 9 coastal British Columbia. It is a converted quail hutch, that still has quail in it. I’m looking to grow some plants in there that are edible/useful that I can harvest that aren’t particularly dangerous for quail if the eat it.
    Also would be good for enrichment for the quail as they used to be in the sun with plants in the enclosure in the ground. But they destroyed them all. I can only do hanging baskets and put pots in there now because they are on concrete since we moved.
     Anybody have any suggestions? I was thinking nasturtiums, maybe some yarrow....if it can tolerate the shade enough. But I’m kind of lost as to what will grow in full shade with humidity, and that are useful/medicinal/easy to keep alive.
2 years ago
Yeah that’s good idea Ken, I was thinking about a hardy Chicago but I’m not sure if I’ll like the taste. I’ve seen people in the area with quite large fig trees that are easily 20’ so there definitely at east some varieties that can thrive here.
2 years ago
I live in Coastal BC, Canada. So I have dryish summers, mild but wet winters reaching (usually) no colder than -12c. Some years theres hardly any freezes, other years it can sit just below -0c for weeks. (Zone 7-8 )
2 years ago
So I just went out and bought myself a Peters Honey Fig tree. Trying to decide where on my property is best for its survival. I live on a fairly steep hill with sandy soil, the back edge of my property is overgrown with 30ft tall Laurels that slowly poison everything near it. ( I want to chop them all down, but my husband likes the privacy since the neighbors behind us would tower over us.) Front yard soil is way dryer than the back yard. There is a wall running down the back portion of the east side of my property for protection from the wind (close to the laurels though.) So would it be better to risk the wind exposure and plant in the middle of my back yard, or the ‘laurel exposure’ by the east wall and hope for the best?
2 years ago