Jeffrey Carlson

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since May 30, 2018
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kids books homestead
Greene County, NY Zone 5b
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Recent posts by Jeffrey Carlson

I'm a little south of Albany, not near where you are, but I 2nd Edible Acres and there is the Finger Lake Permacutlure institute:
https://fingerlakespermaculture.org/

Akiva Silver is closer to PA I think, but his Twisted Tree Farm has a lot of good info
4 months ago
Edible Acres in NY - Zone 5b - sells and grows it. He's also active on here I think. He has a Youtube channel and a couple of videos about it as well. I think he uses it for privacy. Haven't tried it myself yet, but it seems to be growing great for him.
1 year ago
Went from having not a whole lot to do, to having too much to do haha. So this thread needs an update. Like a lot of people in NY and across the US, because of all the rain, I was really late getting things planted, so hopefully things like tomatoes weren't planted too late.

Since the last update(which was almost a year ago), I converted a canvas shed into a greenhouse for the chickens over the winter. It worked very well, I'm really happy with it. I have seen other people do this, and add chicken wire or something similar around the inside, which I also should have done, because they scratched the hell out of it. The photo below is right after it was finished and still looks nice haha. The deep bedding/compost floor worked well too, but I don't think I had the right ratios of C & N to really let it compost. But it kept the smell down, and worked well as mulch. Though I found out that the chickens don't like oats, because it grew up everywhere I used the chicken bedding as mulch. But I like oats, so that's fine with me.



I made 5) 40ish foot rows off the side of my house. I tried to get one photo with all the rows in it, but it all mostly just looks green, sorry haha. The very top row is einkorn, also seeded with some clover. I'm very certain I seeded it too thick, I was worried about birds. It's been heading out, but at maybe 2' tall for most of the plants, some sorter haha. The second row is oats for the first half, and then onions for the second. The third row started off as just potatoes. I had started some seedlings from potato seed I saved from last year, but I didn't have enough for the full row. So for the rest of it I tried just planting store bought potatoes. But they weren't organic, and didn't sprout at all. So I planted some Buckwheat over the non-sprouting potatoes. The 4th row was going to be beets and carrots, but I didn't have enough seeds so there is also kale, sunflowers and black beans in there. The deer have eaten a lot of the bean plants, but oddly not the ones directly underneath the sunflower plants. The last row, I tried to do another "random plot." Sunflowers from seed saved from the last random plot, a lot of different kinds of lettuce, turnips and radishes. All of that is doing well. The random plot, and the potatoes started from seed are doing the best. Also doing really well is all the oats that sprouted from the chicken bedding I used as mulch haha.





Here is the other part of the garden, which has tomatoes, comfrey, garlic and sunchokes. To the right of it (not seen in the photo) are also some beans, but they have been devastated by slugs, even with the new addition of ducks.



I also built a hugel bed (trying to get the PEP BB)


And I am trying a 3 sister garden for the second time (and realizing I don't have a photo of that). The first one I tried was maybe 5 years ago at the last place I lived. The corn got to the height recommended before planting the beans and squash. Then it stopped getting taller, so the beans tore down the corn and it ended up being just a squash patch. Hopefully it works this year haha.
1 year ago
Here is my attempt at this BB, I built it up as high as I could on a tractor with front end loader, and then hand digging a trench around it. I cheated, in that the trench I dug to make it at least 7' high isn't all the way around, because I built this on a slope, so there would be a whole lot of digging on one side. So if I need to make the trench around the whole thing, I will do that. But at least a section of it is at least 7' high. I tried to show that in the photos.

I actually started this last fall, but couldn't complete it in time for other projects that needed to be done before winter, then this year I couldn't get to it until now while I had the week off. Really all I had done was the 1st layer of wood, and a little bit of dirt. Which got kicked out by my chickens haha. You can see in one older photo a tan canvas shed off in the distance (which later became a greenhouse coop) and then the canvas in a big pile in a newer photo, showing the passage of time. The land I built this on was my parent's before mine, and my Dad kept a "compost pile" out back in the woods. At least that what he called it. It was really a giant pile of bark scraps from firewood, ash cleaned out from the wood stove, extra dirt and other stuff he pile up and left for years and years. It was sort of already a hugel bed, just way out of the way to be useful for me. So I moved that dirt (which had a lot of bits of bark and other wood partially decomposed in it already) to build this hugel bed. I thought I had a photo of it, guess not, sorry. I moved all I could and dug a trench around some of it to reach the 7' mark.

For what I planted, I mixed a bunch of mixes. Prairie moon's "insectopia mix", Johnny's select beneficial insect mix & hummingbird mix, a lupine mix, some seeds I gathered from cleome & wild mustard (I think) from around my house last year, 3) 15g secale multicale rye packets (which I have pictures of earlier in this thread), some crowns/root pieces from a couple of big comfrey plants and some Sunchoke tuber pieces. This was the wrong time of year to plant most of this I think, and the wrong time of year to try and dig out the sunchoke tubers to plant elsewhere. I also planted some sunflowers, and I'm sure I am forgetting something. The different mixes I used have some overlap, but the prairie moon mix by itself had like 40 different varieties, mostly flowers but also some grasses and a "cover crop" variety of wheat. In the photo I  have a container of field peas that I was going to mix with oats in case my main mix didn't cover the whole thing, but I ended up not needed it.

For mulch, it was mostly chicken bedding from the greenhouse, which started from grass clippings and pine shavings, some of it "fresher" and not so broken down. But I also used fresh cut weeds to sort of hold the mulch in place, some stalks of other plants that have been sitting around outside for at least a season, and dried grass clippings. In the photo I also have a pile of branches that I thought I would use to pile on top of everything to hopefully hold it together, but I decided I didn't need it. I could be wrong haha. If I seem light on the mulch I was afraid to put too much on there, smothering the seeds I planted.

Almost forgot about the wood I used, most of it was dead elm (I think it was elm) that fell down along the tree line. Some of it was dead elm that I cut down. I also used some eastern red cedar branches to help hold things together.

It's not pretty, but hopefully it looks better once things start sprouting on it.

Also, sorry, I misread the instruction of "three pics of three different stages" so I might not have enough photos.

The following two photos are from last late summer/fall, in the first one maybe you can see the stakes with white string outlining where I later laid the wood. Along the tree-line in the distance you can see the same type of standing dead trees that I used for the main bits of wood.

And here I have the first layer of wood


And this is two days ago, there is some dirt in with the wood, most of it was dug out by the chickens haha, but they replaced it with their manure, so that's ok I guess.


The first loads of dirt, with more wood piled on top

Same stage, but different angle


Second round of dirt and wood topping.


This is where I missed a few stages of taking photos, but here you can see the bits of decomposed bark and other wood that was already in the dirt I was piling up.


And this is the final height, before mulch


Now with the mulch (and a chicken trying to mess up all my mulch, like everywhere else in my yard.


trying to show off the height of the thing, that 2x2 pole leaning up against the mound is just under 94" long.




This is what I planted, the upper left on the table is the sunchokes, below that is the comfrey crowns, and on the right are the different mixes.


These are the different types of mulch.


The next time I build one of these this high, I am renting an excavator.




1 year ago
pep
A lot, haha. Sorry. I'm not sure. I'll post a photo. I actually ordered 3, 15g packets of seed. All together it's like 55g according to my digital kitchen scale. B&T seeds says on their order page that there are about 30 seeds in 1g. My kitchen scale isn't that accurate, I tried. So 50g is ~1,500 seeds?  

1 year ago
pep
So in my original post, I should have said I can't find a US source for this rye. Because I have found a bunch of European sources. Which, my only worry was having customs messing things up like what r ranson had with the flax seeds from her kickstarter. So I placed an order from France, and recieved them today. Looks like they're fine so I didn't need to worry haha. After I get my other garden beds set up I should be able to move on to working on my Hugelkultur. I got about 50g from a seed shop named La Lettre S Shop.
1 year ago
pep
Ha, guess I was just assuming B&T wouldn't work because US customs would ruin things, and Jason Padvorac didn't have anymore. But I never actually checked. I will double check with both. Thanks a lot.
1 year ago
pep
Hey, excited to attempt this badge bit. Had a question about the Sepp Holzer Grain requirement. Do you mean the grains from this thread? And if you do, do you mean only 12 individual grains planted? Also if you do, where could I find some? Because I have been looking, haha. Or can I attempt to grow regular winter rye, or perennial rye in the way he does, by cutting it before it develops a seed head and harvesting it the next year?

Thanks a lot, sorry if I am being dense.
Jeff
1 year ago
pep
Do you place it over a cup so the "nipple" thing with the holes is towards the cup, put ice in it and pour a mixed drink through it into the cup so the drink gets chilled, but there's no ice in the final drink? Sort of like a strainer? I with something like absinthe you do something similar with ice, and a sugar cube.

No idea what it would be called though.

Or does it somehow crush ice?

Or is it part of one of those cool old cigarette holders that fan them out when you lift the top off?

No idea, haha.
1 year ago
That stove is very cool. Had to look it up quick, most of the results reference Picasso and that photo. I saw a few places selling them (I think, they weren't in English, and I don't speak anything else). Some photos of ones with a shorter "stack" of radiators. I found this similar design at this site, they are also discussing the photo with Picasso. I couldn't get a direct link to post the image of the other stove here, sorry. My browser kept on downloading a text file when I tried to get the link. Looks like it's also French, and also heating a big room, a church. Couldn't really dig up more, but now I want one.
1 year ago