Devin Devine

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since Apr 23, 2014
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Recent posts by Devin Devine

Hey Doug.

Jonas is my backyard. Welcome to the area then
4 years ago
Hello,


I just wanted to put up a beacon, to let people in the area know about the Poconos Permaculture Guild.
The group is just getting started, but so far we've had at least one meeting per month. All good stuff!

I live in Effort PA....kind of in-between Palmerton and Stroudsburg. So far all of our meetings have been in the southern Poconos. We also have some members in Tamaqua, and as far west as Pottsville, so we're probably more accurately called 'the Southern Poconos and Coal Region Permaculture Group'.

So we've mostly been getting together for skill-share type meetings. Next week a gentleman named Bob will be teaching us some low-energy cooking methods and in Early October I'll be leading a cob oven workshop. Attendance has been real good for all of our meetings so far and the vibe has been strong and positive

Meetup page:

http://www.meetup.com/Poconos-Permaculture-Meetup/

FB event pages:

https://www.facebook.com/events/690020491133537/

https://www.facebook.com/events/1225427287483222/
4 years ago
The fence looks styling.
4 years ago
Pecker-thick wood.




Funny guy, right? No, but descriptive terms for useful materials generally win, on my jobsites. I'll say "get me some fries, some cocks and some pizza slices" and my workers then bring me lunch. Kidding, I mean they bring me the right sizes and shapes of stone. Anyway.




I also like "sapling-sized". Equally descriptive, but less jocular.




4 years ago

evan l pierce wrote:Day 63

James and I moved a few tons of rocks over to Ava today. Thanks James! There's lots of projects I'd like to do that will benefit from some stone, and a drystack expert is supposed to be arriving soon, so I thought it'd be a good idea to have some material staged and ready.






Oh I'm on my way alright. Rather stoked of course, too.
4 years ago




Evan, I am so into what you are doing and have been following this thread even though I am basically online for zero minutes per day. I appreciate what you are doing and look forward to meeting.

But I must now correct you and Jocelyn:

I do not do drystack. Certainly, I'm no expert at it.

Yes, I've been trying to come up with a polite way to say that, for days, cause it drove me crazy in the emails...... Dry stone, dry stone masonry, natural stone hardscape, landscaping with stone=cool. Whatevs. Stone artisan, stone guy, stone dude, stone-er. rock knocker=all acceptable. Landscaper, hardscaper, mason, waller even=cool. Dry stack expert however, ooh, a knife in the heart.


Anyway, I shant censor you, you can call your own work dry stack till the cows come home.

Alright, I'm done.

All the above, intended good naturedly.

Signed, your trusty-dusty, handy-dandy, friendly neighborhood stone guy(tm)
4 years ago
hmmm...I really considered starting a new thread v's bringing back this one. Whatever.

Hey allen, how about oiled cloth? Oiled or waxed canvas....like an old sail, or tent kinda thing.

How about an oiled cloth tarp?


A cloth tarp made of canvas or similar, soaked in a drying oil such as linseed and used as the waterproof outer barrier. I've done a few searches...Has this been discussed before?



Ideally you'd have cotton or flax or hemp growing on the land for your cloth source, and then walnut or linseed or similar
growing onsite for the oil source...

How about wax?


The real question here is how long can an oiled canvas tarp last underground--anyone? Can it be made to last a bit longer? How long would it need to last in order to make it worth while? Let's say it lasted ten years. Hell yeah, your house just lasted ten years. Cool, right? And then really....I wonder if you new the tarp was reaching the end of it's life (ten hypothetical years) you just do some careful digging, pull out both sheets and relay with soil layers. Maybe it would even be feasible to just replace the topmost layer of tarp, once every xxx years. Or even, watchout I'm crazy, what if you just left the old tarps in place, merely added a new layer of waxed tarp, plus a few inches of new soil, once ever xxx years.?

5 years ago
How about an oiled cloth tarp?


A cloth tarp made of canvas or similar, soaked in a drying oil such as linseed and used as the waterproof outer barrier. I've done a few searches...Has this been discussed before?



Ideally you'd have cotton or flax or hemp growing on the land for your cloth source, and then walnut or linseed or similar
growing onsite for the oil source...

How about wax?


The real question here is how long can an oiled canvas tarp last underground--anyone? Can it be made to last a bit longer? How long would it need to last in order to make it worth while? Let's say it lasted ten years. Hell yeah, your house just lasted ten years. Cool, right? And then really....I wonder if you new the tarp was reaching the end of it's life (ten hypothetical years) you just do some careful digging, pull out both sheets and relay with soil layers. Maybe it would even be feasible to just replace the topmost layer of tarp, once every xxx years. Or even, watchout I'm crazy, what if you just left the old tarps in place, merely added a new layer of waxed tarp, plus a few inches of new soil, once ever xxx years.?


5 years ago
My opinion is yes, absolutely tell stories. Your rooster story is a good one too, for he purpose, and well told.

And I'd eat one of the twin roosters, than see how it goes.
5 years ago
Cool stuff--thank you for your reply.
5 years ago