Christian Sweningsen

+ Follow
since Nov 29, 2012
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
1
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Christian Sweningsen

I studied in John Wilkes' studio in the late 70s, even managed to make a (small) functioning flowform.

They are not "mathematical"; they can only be developed from experiencing the water flow in an actual instance, in a mass of clay, and working with the shapes to enhance the ways the water "wants to flow".

There are no shortcuts - except to find someone with a purchased example, who will allow you to make a mold.

And fwiw their function is not simple aeration.
4 months ago
Some Serious Synchronicity. I'm in the midst of organizing a decade of chaos in office/study, and just found notes from the Toensmeier workshop, including the greenhouse!

It is "Tripple Brook Farm" (not a typo: http://www.tripplebrookfarm.com

He used 1x2, not 1x4 on the trusses, and 2x4 blocks on the south. The inside insulation was held in place with homosote blocks, screwed, with fender washers, 2 ft on center. Also had added a 5/4x3 brace from base to maybe halfway up the truss, with a 5/4x2 stringer to catch the brace.

Had figs, pomegranate, qumquats, guava, loquats, dwarf avocado growing . . .

-- Christian
2 years ago
An interesting question. What I can report is that it had operated for decades and showed no signs of rot. I would imagine that any condensation would run down the plastic to the sill. Sill, on top of conrete, should be rot-resistant in any case. We used redwood in Cali, imagine cedar or locust, maybe white oak out here, but it would be standard practice (though "*standard* practice" would be pressure treated!)

On the north side you would want a vapor barrier on the under side.

Christian
2 years ago
Couple of notes. I worked for many years in solar heating, both installation and design, including some passive, and many solariums (Northen California). Definitely do not insulate inside the foundation, there is no point. Good thermal mass, as another noted. Roof, insulate the north side, 8" - 12".

I viisted a home-made greenhouse in northern Massachusetts that met your needs. He was growing cirtrus. Don't recall the name, but Eric Toensmeier (sp?) took us there during a Permaculture event.

This man made his own trusses, brilliant. He made a form from stakes on the ground,  in a quarter-cricle; then bent a 1x4 pine board and clamped it. Then he glued and screwed 2x6 blocks ( I would recommend 2x3 on the south, 2x8 or more on the north), then bent another 1x4 over those, glued and screwed. Instant curved truss.

Concrete floor and foundation, insulated. (Btw, as one option, insulation is as effective laid flat, just underdroud, out from the perimeter.)

He used a center beam, end to end, with the trusses from beam to foundation. On the south side he just stapled plastic inside and outside of the truss, instant double-glazing. On the north, he covered the outside with this plywood, then asphalt shingles. Inside on north I don't recall the finish, might have just been plastic, or thin ply again.

End walls were insultated.

Even though your structure is different, with your windows, the same technique could be used.

Good luck!

Christian Sweningsen
2 years ago